February 6, 1901


Col. 185, tliird paragraph from bottom of page should read thus :


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The MINISTER OF INLAND REVENUE.

Topic:   ERRATA-TOL. I.
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FIRST SESSION-NINTH PARLIAMENT


Wednesday, February 6, 1901. To-day being the first day of the meeting of the First Session of the Ninth Parliament for the despatch of business,-Sir John George Bourinot, K.C.M.G., LL.D., D.C.L., Clerk of the House of Commons, and Lieut.-Col. Henry Robert Smith, Serjeant-at-Arms, Commissioners appointed by Dedi-mus Potestatem for administering the Oath to Members of the House of Commons, all attending according to their duty, Henri G. LaMothe, Esquire, Clerk of the Crown in Chancery, delivered to the said Sir John George Bourinot, a Roll containing a list of the names of such members as had been returned to serve in this parliament. The aforesaid commissioners did administer the oath to the members who were present, which being done, and the members having subscribed the roll containing the oath, they repaired to their seats. A message was delivered by Ren6 Edouard Kimber, Esquire, Gentleman Usher of the Black Rod : Gentlemen, The Honourable Mr. Justice Gwynne, in his capacity as Deputy Governor, desires the immediate attendance of this Honourable House in the Senate Chamber. Accordingly, the House went up to the Senate, when the Speaker of the Senate said : Honourable Gentlemen of the Senate: Gentlemen of the House of Commons: I have it in command to let you know that His Excellency the Governor General does not see fit to declare the causes of his summoning the present parliament of Canada until the Speaker of the House of Commons shall have been chosen according to law ; but, to-morrow, at the hour of three o'clock in the afternoon, His Excellency will declare the causes of his calling this parliament. And the House being returned,


ELECTION OF SPEAKER.

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The PRIME MINISTER (Sir Wilfrid Lau-rier).

Sir John Bourinot, it is probably in the minds of all the members now assembled on the floor of this House that the unfortunate circumstance of the recent

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demise of the great and noble lady who was for more than sixty years our Sovereign, should call from us, as our first duty, the adoption of an address to His Majesty the King, conveying to himself and the Royal Family the expression of our deep condolence for the great loss they have sustained-a loss which is not theirs alone, but which I am sure is the loss of all British subjects the whole world over. But I would remind lion, members at the same time that this House has no voice and can take no action except through the Speaker of the House, and that practically it has no existence for business until a Speaker has been elected. So, from the very necessity of the case, our first duty must be to elect a Speaker. I would also remind the House that our next duty, according to parliamentary usage, is to hear from His Excellency the Governor General the reasons why he has thought fit to summon us together. When this double duty has been performed, I am sure it will be very appropriate-and in this I express the views of all the members of this House-that _ we should pass such an address as I have just alluded to. Therefore, I here and now invite the House to proceed at once to the election of a Speaker, and I suggest as a fit and proper person for the occupancy of that high office-the highest in the gift of the House of Commons-Louis Philippe Brodeur, member for the electoral district of Rouville. The cheers which have just met the name of Mr. Brodeur are an evidence that his acceptance of this high office will be acceptable at all events to tbis side of tbe House, and I venture to hope that it will be equally acceptable to the other side. We have endeavoured in this country to follow as closely as possible the parliamentary system of Great Britain, where the accumulated experience of many centuries has brought that system well nigh to perfection. In one particular, however, and a very important one, we have departed from that system. In England, when once a Speaker is elected, he is elected practically for life. He is continued in office from parliament to parliament, and occupies the Chair so long as he has a seat in the House. We have adopted another system. With us it has become almost an article of the unwritten law of parliament that with a new parliament there should be a new Speaker. Of course, a good deal might be

said as to the respective merits of these two practices ; there is no occasion, however, to enter upon such a discussion to-day. The hon. gentleman who was our Speaker in the last parliament, Sir James Edgar, unfortunately did not complete his term, having been removed by death. The hon. gentleman who succeeded him, Mr. Bain, did not seek re-election. Therefore we have not with us to-day the Speaker of the late parliament ; but in that parliament the office of Deputy Speaker was occupied by the hon. gentleman whom I have just named, Mr. Brodeur ; and I venture to assert that he performed the duties of that office with great acceptance to all, displaying both fairness of mind and an accurate knowledge of parliamentary practice ; and in the high position to which I venture to hope he will now be called by the unanimous assent of the House, I am sure he will display the same qualities in a still higher degree, and will be a true representative Speaker, holding even the scales of justice between all parties, and maintaining the principles and dignities of that great office. I therefore beg to move, seconded by Sir Richard Cartwright, that Louis Philippe Brodeur, member representing the electoral district of Rouville, do take the Chair of this House as Speaker.

Topic:   ELECTION OF SPEAKER.
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Charles Tupper

Sir CHARLES HIBBERT TUPPER.

Sir John Bourinot, speaking for the moment for His Majesty's loyal opposition in this House, I may say that we do not intend to question in any way the selection of the hon. gentleman whose name has been mentioned for the high office of Speaker of the House of Commons of Canada : and I merely rise to add that we fervently hope on this side of the House that the hon. gentleman, an old colleague of many of us on both sides of the House, will be so able to observe the great traditions of that high office, both in this House and in the House of Commons of the mother country, that he may confidently rely upon the' equal support of the gentlemen who sit either to the right or the left of the Chair.

The motion being put to the House,

The Clerk of the House (Sir John Bourinot) declared the motion carried in the affirmative nemine contradicente; and Louis Philippe Brodeur, Esquire, member for the electoral district of Rouville, duly elected to the Chair of the House.

Mr. Brodeur was conducted from his seat in the House to the Speaker's Chair by Sir Wilfrid Laurier and Sir Richard Cartwright.

Topic:   ELECTION OF SPEAKER.
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Mr. SPEAKER ELECT@

I beg to tender to this House my most sincere thanks for the great honour they have been pleased to confer upon me. by electing me to be their Speaker. It will always be my earnest de-

Topic:   ELECTION OF SPEAKER.
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LIB

Wilfrid Laurier (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Sir WILFRID LAURIER.

sire to deserve the confidence reposed in me and to discharge my duties with the greatest impartiality. I am somewhat diffident as to my ability to meet the requirements of this important function; but I do venture to rely upon the indulgence of the House, and I am sure that members, on both sides, will always assist me in preserving the freedom and dignity of debate, and in vindicating our rights and privileges according to our rules and established usages.

The Serjeant-at-Arms then placed the Mace on the Table of the House.

On motion of the Prime Minister the House adjourned at 3.30 p.m.

Thursday, February 7, 1901.

Topic:   ELECTION OF SPEAKER.
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February 6, 1901