May 23, 1901

CON

John Graham Haggart

Conservative (1867-1942)

Hon. Mr. HAGGART.

I thought perhaps the right hon. Prime Minister had already transgressed the rule, and was not confining his remarks entirely to the length of Mr. HAGGART.

the speeches, but had dragged in my name in some way. I did not hear all that was said by the leader of the opposition and by the right hon. gentleman, but I understood from what I heard on coming in that the Prime Minister was defending the action of his colleague the Minister oi Railways and Canals. If I am precluded at this time from entering into a debate upon the Intercolonial Railway, by the rules of the House, I. of course, do not desire to trespass upon those rules.

Topic:   SUPPLY BILL.
Subtopic:   DEBATES IN THE HOUSE.
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LIB

Lawrence Geoffrey Power (Speaker of the Senate)

Liberal

Mr. SPEAKER.

I am simply stating what the rule is.

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Subtopic:   DEBATES IN THE HOUSE.
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The MINISTER OF RAILWAYS AND CANALS (Hon. A. G. Blair).

I do not know whether I am in order in saying a word, but I would like to be allowed to refer to what the hon member (Hon. Mr. Haggart) has said. He has expressed a desire to make his speech now in arraignment of my management of the Intercolonial way and the administration of my department. I should think, to say the least of it, that the hon. gentleman would not feel it becoming at this moment, when we are within thirty minutes of the hour fixed for recess, to raise a debate of this character, and to enter upon so large a discussion as that, especially when he must know that it would be grossly unfair to myself, inasmuch as it would deprive me of an opportunity of answering what he might have to say. the hon. gentleman on more than one occasion has announced his intention of entering upon this subject before the close of the session, and even a day or two ago he again declared it his intention to bring up this whole question. I certainly was expecting that the hon. gentleman would carry out his declared purpose, and would afford me the opportunity which I desire of entering upon an explanatory statement and rebutting any charges which he may have to make. I want to say to the hon. gentleman now that I court on all proper occasions a review of my management of the department, and a comparison between the results of my administration and the results of his administration. I desire also to say that if I had not had a notice from the hon. gentleman that he intended to take up this subject, I should have desired to answer the speech of the hon member for Hamilton (Mr. Barker). It is very easy to completely demolish the statements which the hon. member for Hamilton made. It is a simple matter for him to take up complicated acts and select one here, and another there, and, another there, ignoring the general results, and dropping out other statements. It is a simple matter for him to make a momentary impression by resorting to means of that kind. But it is not by any means a difficult matter entirely to explode the inferences which the hon. member made.

Topic:   SUPPLY BILL.
Subtopic:   DEBATES IN THE HOUSE.
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RELATIONS BETWEEN THE GOVERNMENT AND THEIR EMPLOYEES.

LIB

Arthur Samuel Kendall

Liberal

Mr. ARTHUR S. KENDALL (Cape Breton).

I desire to take this opportunity of asking the government to furnish at its next session a classification of all the employees in the government service, remuneration or wages of the different classes, hours of employment ; also with any records the government may possess of injury and death from accident to employees ; also records of compensation which has been made for such accident and death during the last ten years ; also to inform the House what recourse government employees or their heirs have to recover compensation for injury or death by accident. I may mention that in several countries a movement is on foot for the amelioration of the condition of wage-earners, and it has resulted in concessions

Topic:   SUPPLY BILL.
Subtopic:   RELATIONS BETWEEN THE GOVERNMENT AND THEIR EMPLOYEES.
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LIB

Lawrence Geoffrey Power (Speaker of the Senate)

Liberal

Mr. SPEAKER.

I desire to call the hon. gentleman's attention to the fact that it is out of order for him to bring up this subject except with the unanimous consent of the House.

Topic:   SUPPLY BILL.
Subtopic:   RELATIONS BETWEEN THE GOVERNMENT AND THEIR EMPLOYEES.
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LIB

Arthur Samuel Kendall

Liberal

Mr. KENDALL.

If the House will allow me, I have only a word or two to say. It is also generally Known that a similar movement is obtaining considerable strength and momentum in Canada. The main demands are for shorter hours of labour, for fair wages, for compensation for injury and death by accident, and for old age pensions. I ask the government now to obtain during the recess all the information available in Canada and in other countries, and to show the results of the operation of those measures. I may say it is expected that before long the government of Canada will be asked to apply some of those measures, so far as may be practical, for the benefit of the wage-earners in the employ of the government, with the object of instituting an example of the relationship that should exist between capital and labour in other employments in Canada.

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Subtopic:   RELATIONS BETWEEN THE GOVERNMENT AND THEIR EMPLOYEES.
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The MINISTER OF FINANCE (Hon. W. S. Fielding).

The hon. gentleman has asked for a very large volume of information, and I am not prepared at the moment to say whether it can be obtained or not. All I can say, is that the subject is one that may properly engage the attention of the Minister of Labour, and on his return we shall not fail to invite (his attention to this request of the hon. gentleman, and he will be able to decide how far it may be possible to meet the desire of my hon. friend.

Motion (Mr. Maclaren, Huntingdon), to adjourn, negatived.

At 12.35 p.m., House took recess.

House resumed at Three o'clock.

Topic:   SUPPLY BILL.
Subtopic:   RELATIONS BETWEEN THE GOVERNMENT AND THEIR EMPLOYEES.
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MESSAGE FROM THE GOVERNOR GENERAL-DECLARATION OATH.


The MINISTER OF TRADE AND COMMERCE (Hon. Sir Richard Cartwright) presented a Message from His Excellency the Governor General. Mr. SPEAKER read the Message as follows Minto. The Governor General transmits to the House of Commons a copy of a despatch from the Secretary of State for the Colonies, dated May 11, 1901, acknowledging the receipt of an address to the King from the Commons of Canada respecting the declaration which the Bill of Rights and the Act of Settlement require the sovereign to make at the meeting of the first parliament, or at the coronation ; and stating that the address has been laid before His Majesty, and will be referred to a Committee of the House of Lords. Government House, Ottawa, May 23, 1901. (From Mr. Chamberlain to Lord Minto.) Downing Street, May 11, 1901. My Lord,-I have the honour to acknowledge the receipt of your despatch No. 81 of March 18, forwarding an address to the King from the Commons of Canada, respecting the Declaration which the Bill of Rights and the Act of Settlement require the sovereign to make at the meeting of the first parliament or at -the coronation. 2. The address has been laid before the King and will be referred to the Committee of the House of Lords, for the appointment of which the Lord President of the Council is about to move with a view to the consideration of the form of oath to be taken by the sovereign on his accession. I have the honour to be, My Lord, Your most obedient humble servant, (Sgd.) J. CHAMBERLAIN. Governor General, The Right Honourable The Earl of Minto, G.C.M.G., &c., &c., &c.


THE CANADIAN FLAG IN FOREIGN PORTS.

CON

Charles Edwin Kaulbach

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. C. E. KAULBACH (Lunenburg).

though having a slight doubt, owing to the fact of the consul, as referred to, so peremptorily charging the captain, I at the time asked the hou. Minister of Marine and Fisheries to inform me as to whether the consul was within his province in dealing out such treatment to the captain, but up to the present I am without an answer.

Now, I beg to say, with all due deference to the hon. minister, that X have obtained the information through the office of the customs, and find that a warrant had been issued under seal dated London, February 2nd, 1S92, by the commissioners for executing the office of Lord High Admiralty of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, and which reads as follows :

Whereas we deem it expedient that Canadian registered vessels shall be permitted to wear the red ensign of His Majesty's fleet, with a Canadian coat of arms on the fly thereof.

We do, therefore, by virtue of the power and authority vested in us, hereby warrant and authorize the red ensign of His Majesty's fleet, with the Canadian coat of arms in the fly, to be used on board vessels registered in the Dominion.

Given tinder our hands, and the seal of the office of the Admiralty, this 2nd day of February, 1892.

(Sgd.) H. FAIRFAX,

Topic:   SUPPLY BILL.
Subtopic:   THE CANADIAN FLAG IN FOREIGN PORTS.
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FRED. G. D. BEDFORD.


By command of their lordships, (Sgd.) EVAN MACGREGOR. To this a circular letter was issued by the Department of Marine and Fisheries, Ottawa, which reads as follows :- In accordance with the permission granted by the above warrant, the following regulations have been adopted by the Canadian government 1. The area of the shield shall in no case exceed one-fourth the area of the Union Jack of the particular ensign. 2. The shield shall be placed centrally in that part of the flag which is beyond the Jack. (Sgd.) WM. SMITH, Deputy Minister of Marine and Fisheries. Department of Marine and Fisheries, Ottawa, June 10, 1895. I desire to say that my object in bringing this matter to the notice of parliament is with the view that the warrant from the office of the Lord High Admiralty, and the circular letter from the Department of Marine and Fisheries may come prominently before the public for the information and guidance of all Canadian ship masters and those engaged in the mercantile marine of Canada.


SUPREME COURT VACANCY.

CON

David Henderson

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. HENDERSON.

Mr. Speaker, in the absence of the right hon. First Minister (Sir Wilfrid Laurier), I beg to ask the lion. Minister of Marine and Fisheries (Sir Louis Davies), who is now leading the House

Topic:   SUPPLY BILL.
Subtopic:   SUPREME COURT VACANCY.
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The MINISTER OF MARINE AND FISHERIES.

The hon. minister of Trade

Topic:   SUPPLY BILL.
Subtopic:   SUPREME COURT VACANCY.
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CON

Charles Edwin Kaulbach

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. KAULBACH.

and Commerce (Sir Richard Cartwright) is present.

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Subtopic:   SUPREME COURT VACANCY.
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CON

David Henderson

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. HENDERSON.

The question I am going to submit is to the hon. Minister of Marine and Fisheries, and it is whether he can give the House any information before we separate as to when the appointment to the vacancy on the Supreme Court bench will be made, and to whom it will be given?

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Subtopic:   SUPREME COURT VACANCY.
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The MINISTER OF TRADE AND COMMERCE.

I am afraid I must ask my hon. friend (Mr. Henderson) to give notice of the question, and it shall receive our best consideration.

Topic:   SUPPLY BILL.
Subtopic:   SUPREME COURT VACANCY.
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May 23, 1901