January 28, 1910

LIB

Sydney Arthur Fisher (Minister of Agriculture)

Liberal

Mr. FISHER.

He will come under the Act if he sells seed under a name that would come under the designation of clause 7.

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CON
LIB

Sydney Arthur Fisher (Minister of Agriculture)

Liberal

Mr. FISHER.

No, but successful farmers would not buy it under that name.

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CON

William Wright

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. WRIGHT.

Well, they do buy it. I have bought and sold hundreds of thousands of bushels under names of that kind.

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CON

John Albert Sexsmith

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. SEXSMITH.

The farmers buy No. I as they are reasonably protected, and I think they get a fair quality of seed, or as good as they could reasonably expect. But, without a No. 2 or a No. 3 grade, if we so designate it by numbers, we could not supply the trade. A great many farmers are compelled to buy No. 2 or No. .3 because we cannot supply the trade with No. 1. I think it would not be going too far to ask the minister to have these very dangerous seeds extended to the other grades as well and prohibit the sale of them altogether. What are the names of the seeds which are prohibited in No. 1?

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LIB

Sydney Arthur Fisher (Minister of Agriculture)

Liberal

Mr. FISHER.

They are named in clause 6. They are prohibited in all seeds, and in clause 7 are those prohibited ones which are prohibited in No. 1. In regard to a second grade, when we were discussing the arrangement of this Bill, we examined into that, tout we did not wish to encourage the sale of any seeds except No. 1. We did not wish therefore to fix a standard which would toe pretty dangerous and very low. If we were making a standard of No. 2 slightly below No. 1, the relief that farmers and seedsmen must have would be very slight. If we made the difference very considerable, there would be a great temptation for many people to say: Well, No. 2 cannot be very bad, because there are a lot of numbers below No. 1, and I will buy it because it is cheaper. My hon. friend may

contend that the trade could not supply' the whole demand for No. 1. If that is largely true, it may be found to be a good sound argument in favour of creating a No. 2 grade, and I will look into that with the; greatest care. If I find, the facts such as will justify it and my officers can make a satisfactory description of a second grade,>

I would be rather disposed to introduce it into this Bill.

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CON

John Best

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. BEST.

I think that the farmers should sow the best class of seed they can get, but the great difficulty we find is that when we buy No. 1 seed and it turns out to be of an inferior quality we cannot get back at the man who sells, it. Last spring a dealer in our town sold what was supposed to be first-class seed to a farmer, but which proved to be not nearly up to tire standard. The dealer was fined $2. He had bought it from a wholesale dealer in Toronto, but nothing further came of the matter and it was dropped. We find that this is the greatest trouble we have. Farmers are trying to use the very best seeds , they can get, but we are often deceived in the seed we buy, and it is not worth while to go after the seller .for all the fine that is imposed.

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LIB
CON
LIB
CON
LIB

Sydney Arthur Fisher (Minister of Agriculture)

Liberal

Mr. FISHER.

That brings up the question whether the fines are sufficiently severe. We publish the names of those who are fined, and that has a more deterrent effect than the actual amount of the penalty.

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CON

George Eulas Foster

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. FOSTER.

That would have more effect on the wholesalers than on the small retailers.

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LIB

Sydney Arthur Fisher (Minister of Agriculture)

Liberal

Mr. FISHER.

Yes. If the fines are not sufficient to deter, I have no hesitation in saying we will have to increase them.

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CON

John Albert Sexsmith

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. SEXSMITH.

I believe that the more dangerous seeds should be prohibited altogether. The sowdhistle is one of the most obnoxious weeds we have, and I regret to say that it is spreading through the province of Ontario.

Mr, SPROULE. It is a very common thing to sell two or three grades of seed, and while the good farmer will take nothing but the best grade, others are not so careful. Now, clause 6 provides that the package must have the full name and address of the seller with the name and kind of seeds and the common names of the weed contained in the seeds. I do not Mr. FISHER.

think that law is complied with, because if it were nobody would buy the weeds if he knew they were in the seed.

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LIB

Sydney Arthur Fisher (Minister of Agriculture)

Liberal

Mr. FISHER.

The very fact that the name of these weeds is on the package is an open warning to the farmers not to buy, and they don't buy.

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CON
LIB

Sydney Arthur Fisher (Minister of Agriculture)

Liberal

Mr. FISHER.

Then it is sold in contravention of the law. If a man has a quantity of seeds which contain these weeds, he can sell them legally by putting the names of the weeds on the package, but if he does, of course nobody will buy them.1

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CON

Thomas Simpson Sproule

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. SPROULE.

It is a common practice to offer for sale different grades of seed, and people buy them.

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CON

John Albert Sexsmith

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. SEXSMITH.

I repeat that the sale of wild mustard and sow-thistle seed by the dealer or the farmer or any one else should be absolutely prohibited.

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January 28, 1910