February 27, 1911

CON

William Sora Middlebro

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. MIDDLEBRO.

When the reciprocity treaty was brought into this House, his own Finance Minister said that the first action of the Conservative party would be to beat the drum.

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   FLYING OF FLAGS IN CANADA.
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LIB

William Stevens Fielding (Minister of Finance and Receiver General)

Liberal

Mr. FIELDING.

They are doing that.

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Subtopic:   FLYING OF FLAGS IN CANADA.
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CON

William Sora Middlebro

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. MIDDLEBRO.

That means no more than waving the old flag. I am surprised that the member for Pictou has moved the

adjournment which means shelving this question. I cannot see why they cannot adopt the resolution which does not become law, but simply affirms the opinion of this House. A Canadian visiting another country and not showing proper respect for the flag of that country would be open to the same blame as a foreigner acting in that way in Canada.

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Subtopic:   FLYING OF FLAGS IN CANADA.
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CON

Arthur Samuel Goodeve

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. A. S. GOODEVE (Kootenay).

I agree with the hon. member for Pictou (Mr. Macdonald) that there should be no division of opinion in the House upon this question. I see no reason why the government should not accept this resolution in the spirit in which it has been moved. The hon. member criticises it because it is not couched in such language as would be used in a statute and he seems to me to be begging the question. The resolution says that in the opinion of this House proper regulations should be issued by the government of the Dominion of Canada. The resolution leaves it open to the House or any. member to decide what would be proper regulations to carry out the spirit of the resolution. The hon. member has himself made the argument for adopting this resolution, he has said that the spirit of loyalty in this country has been rather quiescent. It seems to me that this is but the fitting: outcome of the gradual growth of the national spirit in this Canada of ours. It is quite true that we Canadians can look back to the time when our young men were leaving for the United States and were ready to give allegiance to that flag. I am glad to say that that is changed to-day, but our young men are realizing that we have a national spirit of our own, that the day has come when it is the proud boast of the manufacturers of Canada to place on their goods the trade mark: Made in Canada. A Canadian citizen is proud to purchase goods vyith that particular trade mark upon them, and now to-night the hon. member for London (Mr. Beattie) proposes to go one step further and to say that the flag, the emblem of our nationhood, shall be displayed pn all occasions so that those who come as guests to our country shall realize that as our guests they must give due honour and respect to that flag. There is nothing more in the resolution, and for that reason I cannot see why the Minister of Finance should object and ask that it be withdrawn. He and other speakers on that side have all said that they agree with the spirit of the resolution. The member for Pictou says he agrees with the kernel of the resolution, the only difference is with the phraseology, but as I have pointed out this resolution will not become legislation. I trust that the Minister of Finance will withdraw his objection, and that this resolution may go forth from this House unanimously to the people of Canada affirming that we shall take one step further in

our nationhood, and that we as members of parliament say that the flag of Canada, and the flag of the empire shall always be pre-eminent in our own country.

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Subtopic:   FLYING OF FLAGS IN CANADA.
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CON

Joseph Elijah Armstrong

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. J. E. ARMSTRONG (East Lambton).

I heartily support the resolution which is only an expression of the opinion of this House, and I think the hon. member for London (Mr. Beattie) is deserving of the thanks of every member for bringing it forward. It ill becomes the member for Pictou (Mr. Macdonald) to find fault with the language in which it is couched, I would hope rather that he would fall in line and say it was in the best interests of our people. The resolution reads: .

That, in the opinion of this House, proper regulations should he issued by the government of the Dominion of Canada insisting that where a foreign flag or ensign is displayed or used either upon a flag pole, private residence, vehicle or in any other manner or place whatsoever within this Dominion by any person or persons except the accredited representative of a foreign government, a Union Jack of equal size and make shall also be hoisted or displayed therewith at the same time and place, and that the Union Jack shall always be placed in the most prominent position on every such occasion.

The kernel of the resolution, to use the words of the hon. member for Pictou, is sound and he agrees heartily with it ; and yet in the very same breath he moves the adjournment of the debate practically to kill it. I have only to say that I have hearty sympathy with the resolution, and the hon. member for London is deserving ox great credit for bringing it forward.

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Subtopic:   FLYING OF FLAGS IN CANADA.
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CON
LIB
CON

Glenlyon Campbell

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. CAMPBELL.

I will not say thau the hon. member put it exactly in that way, but that was the sentiment that his words expressed. That may be his point of view, and the point of view of the ministerial side of this House ; but hundreds of thousands of people in Canada, many of them the staunchest Grits, think this is the most opportune time to show by a unanimous vote of this House that a certain measure now before this House called reciprocity is dangerous to the flag of Great Britain. For that reason I think this is a most opportune time for this House to vote unanimously in favour of this resolution. Parliament is omnipotent so far as law-making is concerned. If this resolution is passed to-night, there _ is nothing to hinder parliament from putting it in proper form to-morrow so that it can be enforced. For that reason I trust that the House will vote down the amendment of the hon. member for Pictou, which is evidently an evasion and quibble, getting away from the point and trying to becloud the matter before the House.

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Subtopic:   FLYING OF FLAGS IN CANADA.
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LIB

David Bradley Neely

Liberal

Mr. D. B. NEELY (Humboldt).

Mr Speaker, I am sure that the hon. member for London (Mr. Beattie) has nothing but the sincerest motive in bringing this question before the House in the terms of the resolution now under consideration. I cannot say as much for some hon. gentlemen

on the other side who have spoken to the resolution, because it would appear to me, judging from their remarks-take my hon. friend who has just eat down as an example-that it is just as much or more to impress on this House and the country their loyalty that they so vigorously support this resolution as it is the national benefit that they are considering. My hon. friend from Pictou has moved the adjournment pf the debate, and to my mind he has given a very substantial reason for doing so. It is quite true that in the terms of the resolution, if it were to carry, the government are called upon to make proper regulations, and necessarily they have -power to make those regulations in whatever form would seem to them best, if they have power to deal with this matter in that way. But *he purpose of the resolution is stated very clearly, and plainly, and whatever regulations the government might attempt to bring into effect as a result of this House passing the resolution, would help to bring about the result that is asked for by the resolution. The purpose of the resolution would have to be crystallized into legislation in some way. Now, I am sure that my hon. friend from London does not want regulations or laws passed that would bring into effect the purpose of this resolution in the way in which it is stated I his language, Sir, is very broad. These regulations must provide-

That where a foreign flag or ensign is displayed or used, either upon a flag pole, private residence, vehicle or in any other manner or place whatsoever within this Dominion-

I take it that that means even inside a private house.

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   FLYING OF FLAGS IN CANADA.
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?

Some hon. MEMBERS

Oh, no.

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Subtopic:   FLYING OF FLAGS IN CANADA.
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LIB

David Bradley Neely

Liberal

Mr. NEELY.

The wording certainly gives that impression. Now, I am sure my hon. friend (Mr. Beattie) does not want to make it a criminal offence for some American citizen, we will say, who comes here to spend a month or two, or who comes to Canada with the intention of becoming a permanent citizen, to tack the stars and stripes on the walls inside his residence.

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Subtopic:   FLYING OF FLAGS IN CANADA.
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CON

Thomas Beattie

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. BEATTIE.

Would you call the inside of a house a * public place '?

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   FLYING OF FLAGS IN CANADA.
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LIB

William Pugsley (Minister of Public Works)

Liberal

Mr. PUGSLEY.

It does not say ' public place.

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   FLYING OF FLAGS IN CANADA.
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CON

George Taylor

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. TAYLOR (Leeds).

It says ' display,' and the only way to display it is to put it in a public place.

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   FLYING OF FLAGS IN CANADA.
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LIB

David Bradley Neely

Liberal

Mr. NEELY.

The hon. gentleman takes a different meaning out of the word ' displayed or used ' from that which other people would take.

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   FLYING OF FLAGS IN CANADA.
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CON

George Henry Bradbury

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. BRADBURY.

It says * upon.'

138J

i Mr. NEELY. My hon. friend from Selkirk (Mr. Bradbury) had better read the resolution again, for it says:

-displayed or used either upon a flag pole private residence, vehicle or in any other manner or place whatsoever.

Now, if these hon. gentlemen accuse the hon. member for Pictou (Mr. Macdonald) of quibbling, surely they themselves are quibbling when they undertake to say that the words

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   FLYING OF FLAGS IN CANADA.
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CON

Thomas Beattie

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. BEATTIE.

The words are plain English, and all the hon. gentleman has to do is to read them as they are.

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   FLYING OF FLAGS IN CANADA.
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LIB

David Bradley Neely

Liberal

Mr. NEELY.

I have read them exactly as they are. Now, as my hon. friend from I ictou says^ this is a serious question we are considering, I can only again state my position that, by passing this resolution, the House would be declaring that the terms of the resolution would have to be put upon the statute-book. If my hon. friend (Mr. Beattie) wished to effect anything, and not merely to promote this discussion, why should he not have introduced a Bill stating the objection he desired to bring about, and thus giving us something tangible instead of a crude resolution of this kind, which, if passed in its present form, might be very embarrassing, no matter how sincere the intention of the government in dealing with the matter.

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   FLYING OF FLAGS IN CANADA.
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?

Some hon. MEMBERS

Oh, oh.

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Subtopic:   FLYING OF FLAGS IN CANADA.
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LIB

David Bradley Neely

Liberal

Mr. NEELY.

Hon. members need not laugh. I say frankly it might be embarrassing to deal with the matter in the form in which it is put. There is one thing on which I congratulate my hon. friends on the other side. If they have no policy on any other subject, we may always be sure that they will have a policy on the flag.

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   FLYING OF FLAGS IN CANADA.
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February 27, 1911