February 27, 1911

LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Minister of Labour)

Liberal

Mr. KING.

Yes. Some manufacturers in the province of Quebec, who believed that, by reason of this American trust, or rather this company operating in Canada under a parent company in the United States, they were unable to sell some of their commodities which they would have been able to sell if it had not been for the methods adopted by this trust, and who also found it difficult to obtain machinery under the

conditions which this trust exacts, made application before the court of Mr. Justice Cannon of Quebec for an order directing an investigation to be held under the Combines Act. This application has been heard, and this afternoon the government received from Mr. Justice Cannon a communication in which he orders an investigation into that trust. He states at considerable length that these gentlemen, having presented their statement to him, had made out a prima facie case as to the existence of a combination detrimental tc consumers and producers. The investigation will be proceeded with forthwith. The parties affected will have an opportunity of each naming a member of the board of investigation. The two, so named, if they are able to do so, will agree upon a chairman ; otherwise, the

government will appoint a chairman, and these three persons will be clothed with all the powers of a court of record. It is also the intention of the government to appoint a solicitor to assist the parties in getting full information in regard to the working of this combination. In this way it would be possible to bring to light a mass of evidence which it would be impossible to obtain from any records or reports which may be in existence at the present time. This is a combination which, as my hon. friend knows, has occasioned a good deal of interest in the United States and in Great Britain. While there has been reason to believe that it is a combination operating in restraint of trade, up to the present time no effective means have been discovered of really getting at its inner workings. What has happened in the case of this particular organization or trust which is operating in this country, although it is an American organization, if there is reason to believe in its existence, may be carried out under the circumstances with regard to any other trust, and I submit that in the legislation which this government have on the statute-book to-day we have one of the most effective means to be found of getting at precisely the information which my hon. friend hopes to be able to secure by the reports for which he is asking.

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   INFORMATION CONCERNING TRUSTS AND COMBINES IN UNITED STATES.
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LIB

Wilfrid Laurier (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Sir WILFRID LAURIER.

cannot hope that my hon. friend will receive it in as short a time as he would like.

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   INFORMATION CONCERNING TRUSTS AND COMBINES IN UNITED STATES.
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Motion agreed to.


FLYING OF FLAGS IN CANADA.

CON

Thomas Beattie

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. THOMAS BEATTIE (London) moved:

That, in the opinion of this House, proper regulations should be issued by the government of the Dominion of Canada insisting that where a foreign flag or ensign is displayed or used either upon a flag pole, private residence, vehicle or in any other manner or place whatsoever within this Dominion by any person or persons except the accredited representative of a foreign government, a Union Jack of equal size and make shall also be hoisted or displayed therewith at the same time and place, and that the Union Jack shall always be placed in the most prominent position on every such occasion.

He said: Mr. Speaker, this motion is made with the intention of preventing in future the displaying of foreign flags or ensigns indiscriminately throughout the length and breadth of this Dominion. Subjects of other countries are in the habit of flying foreign flags on every possible occasion when within our borders. They seem to forget that whilst they are upon Canadian soil, so long as they do not break the laws of this country, they are entitled to the same protection as our citizens and that the Union Jack is the emblem of authority here in Canada. They also seem to forget that in some of the places they come from the hoisting of our flag would be considered an insult. That cannot be done in foreign countries; yet, foreign flags and ensigns are allowed to be displayed in Canada by those who, through ignorance or otherwise, daily outrage the rules of common decency and international law. This House should insist that those who live within our borders shall not display foreign ensigns to the exclusion of our own flag. More than that, if we desire to keep this Dominion a part of the British Empire we must instill into the minds ot the children of the country a love for the flag which represents our empire.

I bring this matter up now although I intended to have brought it up a year ago. I live on the line between Buffalo and Detroit and I suppose that forty or fifty automobiles pass that way every day. They never display the Union Jack but generally have three or four United States flags. It has come to be that the children of that part of the country do not know whether they are in the Dominion of Canada or in a foreign land. Last year I was up in Muskoka and in the vicinity of the Georgian bay and I had with me two young lads. They asked me: Is this not Canada? I said, I thought it was, but they said: We see nothing but the stars

and stripes. I think it 'is nothing but com-

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   FLYING OF FLAGS IN CANADA.
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LIB

Wilfrid Laurier (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Sir WILFRID LAURIER.

mon decency that when a person hoists the stars and stripes he should put the Union Jack alongside of the American flag. Our people are too easy-going with respect to that matter. It was thought to be necessary to display the stars and stripes at a military banquet held in the city of Toronto. If I were in the United States I would not think of hoisting the Union Jack without putting the Stars and Stripes alongside of it. A case in point occurred last year up in the north country. A minister came over to this country and hoisted the stars and stripes on his flagpole. A gentleman went to him and told him that he thought he should put up the Union Jack as well. He said he would not do it. The gentleman said that common decency, to say nothing of his position, should induce him to put the two flags together. The minister was rather impertinent and the gentleman said: I will give you twenty-four hours to hoist the Union Jack or take that other flag down. The minister refused and another gentleman got a ladder, went up and pulled the flag down. I hope that no one will think that in bringing this matter up my action has any reference to the talk which we have recently heard about annexation. I have nothing of that kind in my mind at all. If we have a flag we should respect it and teach our children that it is the flag of our country.

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   FLYING OF FLAGS IN CANADA.
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CON

Gerald Verner White

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. GERALD V. WHITE (North Renfrew).

Mr. Speaker, I heartily concur in this resolution and in the sentiments which have been expressed by my hon. friend from London (Mr. Beattie) in moving it. It would seem to me, Sir, that we Canadians, loyal and patriotic as we are-I believe as loyal and patriotic a people as ever existed-are not as demonstrative as we ought to be of the patriotic feelings which actuate us. Contrast our action in this respect with that of our neighbours across the line, who, in every town, village, and hamlet of their vast country, are proud to display the stars and stripes. Some thirteen years ago I had occasion to travel through the Lake of the Woods district, along the international border, and across the river in United States territory everywhere the eye rested the flag of the United States was visible, but strange to say, in the town of Fort Frances, on the Canadian side, not a Union Jack was. to be seen. I believe that every true Canadian should take to himself the words of St. Paul: I am a citizen of no mean state, for Sir, we Canadians are citizens1 of no mean country. Canada comprises in territory thirty per cent of the great empire to which we belong and has an area of one-fifteenth of the total area of the globe; Canada possesses unlimited resources in the wealth of the forest, the mine, the fishery; vast stretches of the most fertile land,

great lakes, noble rivers, and mountains, the scenery which is unrivalled. We; the possessors of this grand heritage, should be proud to display on every possible occasion that emblem which is ours, of the greatest empire of history. And, Sir, while we are the fortunate possessors of these great natural resources, we have, I believe, a population as intelligent, as industrious, as sober, as law-abiding and as God-fearing as ever existed on the face of the earth. The Union Jack, which for a thousand years has braved the battle and the breeze in every corner of the known world, the emblem of all this moral and material wealth, is a flag to be proud of. Let me quote from an address delivered before the Empire Club in Toronto in 1906 by Mr. F. Barlow Cumberland, M.A., on the subject of ' The Union Jack of the Empire

The flag tells us whence we came; the flag tells us from whom we obtained it; it tells us that we are to keep it not only for those who are living here, but for those who are loyal to it around the world. Well, then, may it fly upon the school-houses of Manitoba; well has that government taken the foremost step in saying that all those varied nationalities which are coming within their lands shall be taught by the visible emblem which they have placed above their school-houses, that they are coming under the influences and under the charge of the Union Jack. So, too, may we have them all over our school-houses in Ontario. 'Well done' to those men and to those people who would spread the use of these flags among our Canadian school-houses, for they are the signals not only of our own union; they are the signs of a nationality wider than the country in which w'e live; they are a sign of brotherhood with our fellow peoples around the world.

I am happy to say, Sir, that since this address. was delivered the government of Ontario has seen fit to order that the Union Jack shall be displayed from every school-house in the province, on every public holiday throughout the year. Mr. Cumberland continued:

This Union Jack, then, is the flag which is the birthright of each British man; this is the flag which should always fly and be held and be esteemed as our own. It heralds loyalty to our forefathers, to King, to country, and to empire. It speaks to us from the past.; it tells us of the great heroes; it inspires us to greater deeds.

Before concluding I shall cite a stanza of t'erse which I deem appropriate to this occasion:

It's only a small hit of bunting,

Tt's only an old coloured rag,

Yet thousands have died for its honour, And shed their best blood for the flag.

It floats over Cyprus and Malta,

Over Canada, the Indies, Hong Kong,

And Britons where'er their flag's flying. Claim the rights which to Britons belong.

We hoist it to show our devotion To our King, to our country, our laws,

It's the outward and visible emblem Of advancement and liberty's cause.

You may say it's an old bit of bunting,

You may call it an old coloured rag,

But freedom has made, it majestic,

And time has enobled our flag.

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   FLYING OF FLAGS IN CANADA.
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LIB

William Pugsley (Minister of Public Works)

Liberal

Hon. WM. PUGSLEY (Minister of Public Works).

I am very glad indeed that my hon. friend (Mr. Beattie) has moved this resolution, if for no other reason than that it has given us the pleasure of hearing a very eloquent speech from the mover and an equally eloquent speech from the seconder of the resolution. It is certainly well that we should have our attention called to the importance of keeping the flag flying as often as possible-I was going to say as long as possible, but it is unnecessary to say that, because I believe with every member of this House that the Union Jack will fly over Canada as an integral part of the British Empire until the end of time. However, my hon. friend will see that his resolution can hardly be passed with propriety because it calls upon the government to make a rtgulation which will require the Union Jack always to be displayed above any foreign flag which may be flown anywhere in Canada, except on the office or residence of a foreign consul.

We have no statute upon the subject, and therefore the government are powerless to pass a (regulation which could be enforced. In order to make it effective there would have to be a statute and in order that it might be within the purview of the Dominion parliament, it would have to be a part of the Criminal law. It would have t-o be provided that the Union Jack was always to be placed above any foreign flag and penalties would have to be provided for any infraction of the law. Therefore, I am sure my hon. friend will see that the resolution could not be properly passed in its present form. Perhaps all my hon. friend desires, will have been obtained by calling attention to the subject which I admit is one of great importance. I do not know whether or not in other countries there are laws upon the subject, or whether it rests entirely with the people to have this view enforced and upon the re-soect which other people would have for the views of the citizens of these other countries. I know that in many parts of Canada, residents of the United States, who come to this country, are always in the habit of honouring the Union Jack, by placing it above the flag of their own country. There have been cases where that, has not been done, and I know that our people upon a number of occasions have been incensed at the conduct of persons who have declined to honour the flag of our coun-

try. It is worthy of consideration whether or not a law should be passed, which, of course could be enforced by provisions with regard to a penalty.

My horn, friend has called attention to the fact that the Union Jack is flown upon the schoolhouses of Ontario. My impression is that it is flown every day in the year on the school-houses of Manitoba. In that respect, Manitoba has gone away ahead of the loyal province of Ontario, and all honour to the province of Manitoba that it has gone as far as it has, because there is no betteT means of teaching the youth of our country the principles of loyalty, than to teach them to know what the flag stands for, and to honour it as they would do, if it was flown from the school-house every day in the year. If it is flown only on public holidays, the school children are not apt to see it, because they do not attend school on public holidays. Therefore, I think it would be desirable that my hon. friend should endeavour to get the government of Ontario to follow the example which has been set by the government of Manitoba. When I was a member of the government of New Brunswick, the question was seriously discussed, and the government adopted a resolution favourable to having the school trustees fly the flag from the schcol-houses upon every day in the year, providing that some assistance should be given by the Board of Education to enable the various school districts to do so. I do not know whether that regulation has been generally observed.

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   FLYING OF FLAGS IN CANADA.
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CON

Robert Laird Borden (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. BORDEN (Halifax).

Is that by virtue of a statute or a regulation ?

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   FLYING OF FLAGS IN CANADA.
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LIB

William Pugsley (Minister of Public Works)

Liberal

Mr. PUGSLEY.

That is done by regulation, the Board of Education undertaking to contribute a certain amount for the purchase of flags.

It will be gratifying to my hon. friend to know that the order which I have had passed in my department, requiring the flag to be flown every day in the year upon every public building in all the border towns, and all the principal seaports of Canada, has met with, I think, the universal approval of the people of the country.

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   FLYING OF FLAGS IN CANADA.
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CON

John Wesley Edwards

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. EDWARDS.

Under what statute is that flag flown over public buildings and what penalty is attached if it is not flown?

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   FLYING OF FLAGS IN CANADA.
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LIB

William Pugsley (Minister of Public Works)

Liberal

Mr. PUGSLEY.

It is flown by an official of the department of Public Works, and the penalty is, that if he does not obey the order of the department, he will be dismissed from office. The order has been given and the flag is now being flown upon the public buildings in all the border towns and cities of Canada, and also at the principal seaports.

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   FLYING OF FLAGS IN CANADA.
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CON

George Henry Bradbury

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. BRADBURY.

Could I induce the minister to include the city of Winnipeg Mr. PUGSLEY.

and other cities of that kind, where there are so many public buildings ?

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   FLYING OF FLAGS IN CANADA.
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LIB

William Pugsley (Minister of Public Works)

Liberal

Mr. PUGSLEY.

We have started in the way I have described, of ordering the flag to be flown in the border cities and towns and also at the principal seaports. That is so that people crossing the border will see the Union Jack flying and as they come into our country at the various seaports, they will also see the flag of our country flying upon whatever day they happen to arrive. To extend it to every public building in Canada would, no doubt, be somewhat expensive, but I may say to my hon. friend, that this question is under consideration. I myself, think it is worthy of very careful consideration. I believe that if an order were passed to have the flag flown from every public building in every city and town of Canada upon every day in the year-and here, I am expressing my own personal opinion-it would not be unpopular, and I am rather inclined to think the country would justify the additional expense to which the government would be put in having these regulations carried out. However, that is a matter for consideration. I have had applications from other cities than border cities and towns, one from Peterborough; one from Calgary, urging that the flag should be flown on every day of the year in those cities. There have also been applications from other cities and towns throughout Canada. I trust my hon. friend will see that under the present law it would be impossible fox the government to pass an effective regulation, and I hope my hon. friend will feel that he has discharged his duty, by thus bringing the matter forcibly to the attention of the House, and will leave it to the government to consider whether or not some modification should be made in the statutes which would enable his views to be carried out.

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   FLYING OF FLAGS IN CANADA.
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CON

Robert Laird Borden (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. BORDEN (Halifax).

Is there actually a flag supplied to every Dominion public building in the country ?

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   FLYING OF FLAGS IN CANADA.
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LIB

William Pugsley (Minister of Public Works)

Liberal

Mr. PUGSLEY.

That is the understanding, and if my attention is called to any building where the caretaker is not in possession of a flag, I will see that he is supplied with one.

Mr. BORDEN Halifax). As I understand a regulation has been made that in certain towns and cities near the border the flag is to be flown every day in the year. What is the regulation as to public buildings where that does not apply ?

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   FLYING OF FLAGS IN CANADA.
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LIB

William Pugsley (Minister of Public Works)

Liberal

Mr. PUGSLEY.

My recollection is, that it is flown upon the 1st of July, Dominion Day, also upon Victoria Day, St. George's Day, St. Andrew's Day, St. Patrick's Day, and hereafter on St. David's Day. Then upon other days, in Tegard to which directions are given by the Minister of Public Works.

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   FLYING OF FLAGS IN CANADA.
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CON

Richard Blain

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. BLAIN.

What about the 12th of July?

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   FLYING OF FLAGS IN CANADA.
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LIB

William Pugsley (Minister of Public Works)

Liberal

Mr. PUGSLEY.

There is no order that it should be flown on that day.

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   FLYING OF FLAGS IN CANADA.
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CON

Arthur Meighen

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. MEIGHEN.

There were some remarks that fell from the hon. Minister of Public Works that will be gladly welcomed on this side of the House. He finds fault with the resolution on the ground that it calls for the government to enact regulations looking to the protection of the supremacy of the British flag on Canadian soil. It may be that under the statutes now obtaining in Canada regulations would have no legal effect. Of that I do not presume to speak. The objection applies only to the wording of the resolution. It affects in no way the principle, and it would be quite out of the power of the mover and quite within the power of the government through the Minister of Public Works to effect the amendment and make it a statutory provision instead. There is a principle in the resolution. That principle we hope the government will not antagonize. The hon. minister was good enough to express the hope that the Union Jack would for all time fly over the capital of this country. In that, I presume, he also expresses the hope of the government, including the first minister. I do not think it i3 quite (consistent, Though, to expect the Union Jack, which is the flag of the British Empire, to fly on Canadian soil after the ripe fruit has fallen from the tree. I leave that, however, for the Minister of Public Works to work out with his own chieftain. He was good enough to render some applause-and his applause is always appreciated- to the government of Manitoba for doing a little pioneer work in the way of installing into the minds of Canadian youth the importance of reverence for the Union Jack. I want to remind the Minister of Public Works that when this movement was placed in the form of legislation on the statute-books of Manitoba, it was opposed with the bitterest ridicule by the party in Manitoba with which the hon. minister is identified. That party, through its press and speakers, pointed out that this was simply an attempt at flag waving by the Conservative party then in power. I am glad indeed to see the Minister of Public Works come over to our side on this question, and I hope on other and greater occasion, when this side of the House endeavours to protect the Union Jack on Canadian soil against the attacks of its open foes, and against what is worse, the invidious carelessness of the indifferent, we shall find the hon. minister again coming over to our side and assisting us in that great work. Now, Sir, it is my earnest hope-I speak only as one member of the House-that the hon. member for London will not think that his work is done by

simply uttering a few remarks on this occasion, but that this House will take occasion to !do something effective in at least laying down a principle that will do somewhat to secure the supremacy of the British flag on this side of the 49th parallel, even though we must, when securing that supremacy, tolerate the prevalence of other flags. There is no objection, so far as I can see, to citizens of other lands, or to any one, if he sees fit, displaying the stars and stripes, or whatever flag they may be identified with; but there is objection, as has been well pointed out by the hon. member for London to the far too frequent display of that flag to the utter subserviency, the utter neglect of our own flag of empire. It is to prevent that, that the resolution is moved, but I do not think anything whatever will be done to prevent it if it simply stops at that point.

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   FLYING OF FLAGS IN CANADA.
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February 27, 1911