July 26, 1911


Clydesdale class: Hodgkinson & Tisdale Beaverton. M. J. Cowan Cannington. Smith & Richardson Columbus. Craliam Bros Claremont. John Bright Myrtle. and a great many other breeders of standard bred horses. These and others used to grow barley in the old reciprocity days. When the McKinley Bill came in it practically killed that industry, but with that foresight and intelligence that characterize the Canadian breeders all over that county they saw that they had to change their methods. A great many years were spent in this readjustment, and the results have been shown in the splendid tribute that has been paid to the county of Ontario by Dr. Rutherford. Now, after developing this great horse industry and bringing it to its present state of efficiency, the United States come forward and ask us to reciprocate. When the average value of a horse in the United States is $108 and the average price of a horse in Canada is $133 the United States come over to us and say that they would like to reciprocate. The best horse that is raised in North America is raised in the county of Ontario, and the best market for the Canadian horse is the Canadian Northwest. New settlements always require large quantities of horses. Uncle Sam opened up a dozen wests in the past but did he ever reciprocate on those occasions? Did he ever throw open his market to the Canadian horse breeder in those days? Did he ever give us a chance with our horses when he opened up his great west? Not at all. But now that we nave a demand for horses and the average price is higher in Canada than it is in the United States they come forward and propose that we shall have reciprocity. Look at the price of horses in the western states: The five provinces of Quebec, Ontario, Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Alberta combined have but 1,863,714 bead as compared with 1,600,000 bead now in the state of Iowa alone. Then we have a statement from Mr. C. A. Burns, one of the best known horse buyers in Ontario, who addressed a letter to the press in which he declares that reciprocity will ruin the horse business in Ontario. I will not trouble the House by reading the whole of the article but he says: The only protection now of the Ontario farmer is the duty. On a $200 horse, the duty is $65, and on a $150 horse there is a $30 duty at the present time. Remove this duty and let American horses come in here, and make it easy for Canadian buyers to go to the United States markets, and the Ontario farmer will get fully $40 to $90 per head less than he does now for his horses. 1 Some people think that the western farmer wants reciprocity, but I am convinced that it is the American element alone that is crying for reciprocity, and there are a large number of American farmers in the Canadian west. We must preserve Canada for Canadians, and the Ontario farmer will make a big mistake to think that he is going to benefit by reciprocity. I am convinced that reciprocity as proposed will strike the very heart out of the most conspicuous industry of our country, and one in which our farmers excel before all others on the continent of America. In the next ten years in our west there will be demand for an ever-increasing number of horses, the standard should be maintained, and I for one am not going to be a party to handing over our great Northwest markets to the scrub horses of the border states. North Dakota t,,. South Dakota *' " Texas.. .. .. .. ,, t^ <-g Montana 80 Idaho " " " ' ' jpg Washington jo8 ores°? v.'/.:: 103 Ontario jgg It is not much wonder, when you compare the average price of horses in the United +na;e?i.Wlth the average Price in Canada that those experts inserted in their report the following sentence: As to horses Canada has no surplus of importance outside of Ontario. The agricultural development of the north western provinces has put prices of work stock and heavy draft teams at a premium in the territory tributary t? Winnipeg. During the spring of 1910 it is Iniuiai °n good autl"rity not less than JU,000 horses were sold out of Ontario alone for shipment to the market just Mentioned, and prospective loss of this trade is giving Ontario some concern at this time.


CON
CON

James J. Donnelly

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. DONNELLY.

As it is now after midnight I desire to move that the committee rise and report progress.

Topic:   RETAIL PRICES PER POUND.
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?

Some hon. MEMBERS

No.

Topic:   RETAIL PRICES PER POUND.
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LIB

William Stevens Fielding (Minister of Finance and Receiver General)

Liberal

Mr. FIELDING.

We have to meet at eleven o'clock to-morrow morning.

Topic:   RETAIL PRICES PER POUND.
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Motion agreed to, and progress reported. On motion of Mr. Fielding, House adjourned at 12.28 a.m., Thursday.



Thursday, July 27, 1911.


July 26, 1911