March 1, 1912

CON

Robert Laird Borden (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. BORDEN.

As I understand the right hon. gentleman presses to have it stand over.

Topic:   THE GRAIN ACT.
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LIB

Wilfrid Laurier (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Liberal

Sir WILFRID LAURIER.

I think it would be only fair that such an important Bill with so many amendments, should be reprinted before being read a third time.

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CON

George Eulas Foster (Minister of Trade and Commerce)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. FOSTER (North Toronto).

If my hon. friend wishes it to be reprinted before the third reading, wfhich will take

some time, I move that instead of reading the Bill the third time we go into committee on it again for the purpose of filling in the blanks in clause 3.

Motion agreed, to, and House went again into committee on the Bill.

On clause 3, subsection 6-salaries of commissioners,

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CON

George Eulas Foster (Minister of Trade and Commerce)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. FOSTER (North Toronto).

I move that the first blank be filled with the figure 6,500 and the second with the figure 6,000. That fixes the salary of the chief commissioner at $6,500, and those of the other commissioners at $6,000 each.

Mr. OLIVER, Would the minister state the reasons that have led him to fix the salaries at these amounts. They are good salaries, $1,000, and $1,500 higher than the salaries of deputy ministers at Ottawa. .

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CON
LIB

Frank Oliver

Liberal

Mr. OLIVER.

What are the salaries paid to the Railway Commission, and to be paid to the Tariff Commission?

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CON

George Eulas Foster (Minister of Trade and Commerce)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. FOSTER (North Toronto).

The Railway Commission, I think, get $7,000, $8,000, and $10,000. The Waterways Commission lately appointed receive $7,000, and $7,500. The Tariff Commissioners will receive $7,500 and $7,000.

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LIB

Frank Oliver

Liberal

Mr. OLIVER.

In view of the salaries paid to the Tariff Commission the salaries proposed are moderate.

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CON

George Eulas Foster (Minister of Trade and Commerce)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. FOSTER (North Toronto).

I am glad my 'bon. friend thinks 1 have not been extravagant.

Amendment 'agreed to.

Topic:   THE GRAIN ACT.
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LIB

David Bradley Neely

Liberal

Mr. NEELY.

Is it the minister's intention to have the Bill reprinted before it comes up for its final reading ?

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CON
LIB

George Ewan McCraney

Liberal

Mr. McCRANEY.

My attention has been called to the first subclause of section 107 under tire heading of ' Spring Wheat/ which says:

No. 1 Manitoba Hard wheat shall he sound and well cleaned, weighing not less than 60 pounds to the bushel, and ehall he composed of at least 75 per cent of hard Red Fife wheat.

I have before me a resolution, a copy of which was'sent to the hon. minister, in which it was pointed out that the wordis ' well cleaned ' are a hardship, because dockage is now put upon those who sell grain, which is not well cleaned, so that a person who is selling hard wheat which might otherwise grade as No. 1, if it is not cleaned as required by the Act, suffers a double loss-a loss both in grade and in dockage. This resolution points out that justice would be done if the same wording were used as is used with regard to No. 2 Manitoba Northern wheat, and if we used the words "reasonably cleaned ' instead of the words ' well cleaned.' It is pointed out that farmers have not facilities for cleaning well, and that all that they can be expected to do is to clean reasonably. I hope the minister will consider that point.

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CON

George Eulas Foster (Minister of Trade and Commerce)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. FOSTER (North Toronto).

The matter was considered when we were passing over these grades. Not only was it considered in conjunction with the deputation from the northwest who were here, but it has been considered later in conjunction with the inspector himself. There are objections urged against the suggested change in the quality of this grade. The words ' reasonably cleaned ' involve a doubt. A man who is inspecting knows when a grade is well 'Cleaned; that is easily apparent. To say that he must see that it is reasonably well cleaned leaves it open to the interpretation of various inspectors in a different way 'from what it would be if the actual definition were made. That is with reference to the best quality of our wheat, and if any grade of wheat should he raised and kept to a. high standard, it is that grade. The same words are used with reference to No. 1 Hard Fife and No. 1 Manitoba Northern, and it is not until you come to the lower grade of wheat that the words ' reasonably cleaned ' are used instead of the words ' well cleaned.' I can see the point that my hon. friend makes; but this grade should be high, and when it passes out from inspection, it should be well Mr. OLIVER.

cleaned. If there are variations in the wheat itself, as to what is mixed with it, the dockage will always be in proportion to the lamoumt of material for which dockage is allowed. If the wheat is reasonably clean, more dockage will toe taken than if it is well cleaned. I do not see where the [DOT]seller stands to lose in that respect. He does not want to get a price for the grain unless it is up to a certain standard and unless it is well cleaned. There will be a heavier dockage for wheat which is partially cleaned and a lighter dockage for that which is better cleaned.

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LIB
CON
LIB

Levi Thomson

Liberal

Mr. THOMSON (Qu'Appelle).

I do not like to press this matter on the minister under, the circumstances, but I think really it is important to have some change made at the present stage. In the province of Saskatchewan, at least in that part where I reside, we have experimented for some time with wheat. I myself have been growing Preston for a number of years, and as a matter of fact the Act as *it stands now is a dead letter so far as shutting out that wheat is concerned. I sell it year by year and it passes just the same as Red Fife.

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CON

George Eulas Foster (Minister of Trade and Commerce)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. FOSTER (North Toronto).

A twin sister to it.

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LIB
LIB
LIB

Levi Thomson

Liberal

Mr. THOMSON (Qu'Appelle).

Not on sample, we sell on grade, and I have had it repeatedly graded as No. 1 and 2 Northern, that is pure Preston with not a bit of Red Fife in it as far as I could tell, and bearded wheat too. That is done in actual practice without much damage resulting, but it does not look quite right to my mind that there should be a provision in bur Act which the inspectors either wink at, or are unable to carry out. Preston and Marquis are the varieties of grain which I am more accustomed to. I fancy that an expert can tell at almost any time the difference between Preston and Red Fife more by the shape of the grain than anything else. But still they ipass it continually as No. 1 and No. 2 Northern, and it is quite just that they should do so I think. I do not know tliat the tests have shown the Preston to be quite as good a wheat as the Red Fife, but it is so very near it that! there is not a material difference. The Marquis also can be distinguished from the Red Fife, while the Preston is a longer and thinner grain than the Red Fife I think the Marquis on the other hand is a little thicker, and possibly a little shorter and of a deeper red. But the tests so far as they have been applied

show the Marquis to be as good a grain as the Red Fife, or a little better from a flour-making standpoint. I do not wish to press this matter too far but I thought it necessary to tell the minister what I have seen myself; and while, as I say, there may be no very great injury to the farmer, I a?n not sure that to have a law which is virtually ignored is a very good thing. We either ought not to permit our officials to wink at and ignore the Act, or we ought to change the law.

I have grown the Stanley and have found n,o difficulty in selling it, though I think I only grew it one year. But I know that the Stanley is continually being passed as Red Fife. I presume the same applies to the Marquis.

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March 1, 1912