March 1, 1916

CON

Sir ROBERT BORDEN: (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Conservative (1867-1942)

1. A discussion as to the establishment oi a fair wages board or boards has taken place with the representatives of the labour organizations. The discussion also had reference to the application of the Industrial Disputes Act in such cases.

2. The subject has been discussed with the chairman of the Imperial Munitions Board.

3. Confidential communications on the subject have taken place, and the Government has made its views known to the Imperial authorities in the following terms:

A fair wages clause is inserted by the Government of Canada for all contracts for supplies and munitions of war which are ordered by the Canadian Government for the Canadian Military forces. There is therefore no reason whatever from the standpoint of the Canadian Government why the contracts placed by the British Government in Canada should not contain a fair wages clause. In adopting that course the British Government would be directly in line with the course which has been pursued by the Canadian Government in its own contracts. The representatives of the Labour Organizations have been informed that the Government of Canada has no control whatever over the form or nature of such contracts, but that their suggestions would be recommended to the consideration of the British Government.

4. Yes. Except in a few cases in the early weeks of the war, when telegraphic orders were given and no formal contracts were drawn up.

Topic:   MUNITIONS WAGE BOARD.
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POPULATION OF CANADA.

?

Mr. ETIIIER:

1. What is the total population of the Dominion?

2. What is the male population of the Dominion?

3. What is the male population from 10 to 19 years inclusive?

4. What is the male population from 20 to 29 years inclusive?

5. What is the male population from 30 to 39 years inclusive?

6. According to the above statistics, what proportion of the male population from 19

years to 40 years of age would remain in the country after the recruiting or enlisting of 500,000 men of that category?

Topic:   POPULATION OF CANADA.
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CON

Sir GEORGE FOSTER: (Minister of Trade and Commerce)

Conservative (1867-1942)

1. 7,206,643.

2. 3,821,995.

3. 706,155.

4. 756,349.

5. 568,214.

6. Sixty-two per cent.

Topic:   POPULATION OF CANADA.
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IMMIGRATION AND PRODUCTION.


* Sir WILFRID LAURIER: Has the Government, in view of the scheme of co-operation in immigration and land settlement by the use of pub ic credit between the Dominion and Provincial Governments, presented to it, at its request, in a Special Report by its Commissioner, Mr. Arthur Hawkes, dated March IS, 1912, held any communication with the Provincial Governments looking to the development of immigration and land settlement on systematic and scientific lines? If so, with what results?


LIB

William Roche

Liberal

Mr. ROCHE:

The development of immigration and land settlement has been a subject of formal communication between the Dominion and Provincial Governments since March 18, 1912, and numerous informal discussions between officials of the various Governments upon this subject have taken place since that date, and the matter is now being carefully investigated by the Economic and Development Commission. In addition, at' a conference of immigration agents held in the city of Chicago, at which the Governments of the three prairie provinces were represented, the subject of immigration was thoroughly discussed, and steps taken to prosecute a vigorous propaganda in the United Stated, with a view to securing a larger immigration from that country.

Topic:   IMMIGRATION AND PRODUCTION.
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LIB

Wilfrid Laurier (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Liberal

Sir WILFRID LAURIER:

Has the Government taken cognizance of a Resolution unanimously passed by tile Legislature of Saskatchewan in June, 1915, proposing closer co-operation between Provincial and Dominion Governments in regard to immigration and greater production from the soil? If so, what action has been taken to give effect to such proposals?

Topic:   IMMIGRATION AND PRODUCTION.
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LIB

William Roche

Liberal

Mr. ROCHE:

The Dominion Government has appointed the Economic and Development Commission to consider amongst other questions the possibility of "increasing the acreage under cultivation " and of " inducing the settlement of an agricultural population upon the fertile uncultivated lands in Western and Eastern Canada." The Commission will inquire into " the means by which and the lines upon which the Federal Government, whether upon its own

sole initiative or in co-operation with Provincial Governments can best carry out an effective scheme of colonization."

As an evidence of our continued activity in the United States, and of our desire to act in co-operation with the 'western, provinces, the following letter from the Premier of Saskatchewan is presented:

Regina, 17th February, 1916. Dear Sir Robert:

Mr. Calder has shown me your letter to him of 22nd January acknowledging receipt of the joint resolution of the prairie province governments upon immigration work in the United States. All that you say and the suggestions and requests which you offer in relation to the co-ordination of Dominion and Provincial activities are very satisfactory indeed. In the meantime I attended, on Dr. Roche's invitation, the conference of federal agents held at Chicago, January 28, talcing downl with me Mr. Auld, our Acting Deputy Minister of Agriculture. I was highly satisfied with the spirit and proceedings of the Conference. From it I came away convinced that any impression existing that the United States agents had been relaxing their efforts was an entirely mistaken impression. For the recent disappointing results the agents are not to blame; they have continued working zealously in face of extremely discouraging conditions. In some respects their hands may be considerably strengthened by arrangements which will ensure to them more specific, regular and prompt information of affairs in Western Canada, and in this matter Mr. Auld's Department can assist and will assist in future in every possible way. You are of course aware that the Saskatchewan Government maintains that as long as your Government controls our public lands and other natural resources the implied guaranty given in 1905 should be respected, viz; that your Government should be responsible for all outlays for colonization in behalf of Saskatchewan. We have never entered upon immigration work, and will not do so until the control of public resources is transferred to us, but to the extent to which any machinery we have in existence can be used in helping your Government's efforts, we are earnestly desirous of assisting.

Believe me,

Very sincerely yours,

Topic:   IMMIGRATION AND PRODUCTION.
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WALTER SCOTT.

LIB

Wilfrid Laurier (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Liberal

*Sir WILFRID LAURIER:

Has the Government received any communications from the Toronto Board of Trade or other bodies, urging the necessity for an improved immigration policy? If so, what are they, and what steps have been taken to give effect to them?

Topic:   WALTER SCOTT.
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LIB

William Roche

Liberal

Mr. ROCHE:

Numerous representations for a changed immigration policy have from time to time been made directly and indirectly to the Dominion Government. The suggestions have varied from the advocacy of " a wide open door " to the most restricted form of " restricted immigration/* It has not been considered advisable to de-

part from the present policy of encouraging the immigration of suitable agriculturists and, when necessary* desirable female domestic servants, and the withholding of any encouragement to come to Canada of those desiring to follow other occupations.

Prior to the outbreak of war immigration to Canada was most satisfactory, as is evidenced by the following figures:

1910- 11

311,0841911- 12

354,2371912- 13

402,4321913- 14

384,878

Topic:   WALTER SCOTT.
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NEW ZEALAND WHEAT PURCHASES.

LIB

Mr. CARVELL:

Liberal

1. Has the Government of Canada, since the outbreak of the war, purchased any quantity, and if so, what amount, of wheat on behalf of the Government of New Zealand?

2. If so purchased, was it done on the request of the said New Zealand Government?

3. Where was the said wheat stored, and is any portion of the said wheat now in warehouse in Canada? If so, where?

4. What amount thereof has been disposed of, and when?

Topic:   NEW ZEALAND WHEAT PURCHASES.
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CON

Sir GEORGE FOSTER: (Minister of Trade and Commerce)

Conservative (1867-1942)

1. Yes. 1,406,732.30 bushels.

2. Yes

3. After its purchase it was stored in various elevators in Canada until shipped to New Zealand, or until otherwise disposed of. None of this wheat is now in warehouse in Canada.

4. 504,223.40 bushels have been shipped to New Zealand, and the balance, 902,508.50 bushels, were sold at New Zealand's request on the 10th January last.

Topic:   NEW ZEALAND WHEAT PURCHASES.
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WHEAT COMMANDEERED BY GOVERNMENT.

LIB

Mr. CARVELL:

Liberal

1. What is the total amount of wheat commandeered by the Government of Canada since the 1st day of August last?

2. What amount of said wheat has been shipped from the elevators, and the dates of said shipment?

Topic:   WHEAT COMMANDEERED BY GOVERNMENT.
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CON

Sir GEORGE FOSTER: (Minister of Trade and Commerce)

Conservative (1867-1942)

1. 13,621,822.50 bushels.

2. It is impossible to answer this question in its present form. In moving the wheat to the seaboard the same lot may have to pass through one, two, or more elevators, and would show as having been shipped from elevators one, two, or more times.

Topic:   WHEAT COMMANDEERED BY GOVERNMENT.
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PURCHASE OF DESKS.

LIB

Mr. CARVELL:

Liberal

1. What is the value of desks purchased by the Government since the fire in the Parliament buildings?

2. From what persons or firms were the said desks purchased?

Topic:   PURCHASE OF DESKS.
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March 1, 1916