March 21, 1916

LIB

Charles Marcil

Liberal

Mr. MARCIL:

I would ask the hon. the acting Minister of Militia if it would not be a wise thing to have a Government publication of some kind giving a list of the Canadians who have been decorated either by the British, French or other Governments. I had a request from a constituent of mine for a list of Canadians who have been decorated for their services, abroad, but I understand from the Militia Department that there is no record kept of these decorations. Would the minister give the matter some attention, and see if it would not be possible to have a record of some kind?

Topic:   RECORD OF DECORATIONS OF CANADIAN SOLDIERS.
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CON

Albert Edward Kemp (Minister Without Portfolio)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. KEMP:

A record will no doubt be compiled as soon as possible. The hon. gentleman says that he has been informed that there is no record. I think that is correct. I will make inquiries and see what can be done towards compiling such a record as soon as possible.

Topic:   RECORD OF DECORATIONS OF CANADIAN SOLDIERS.
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PLANS OF PARLIAMENT BUILDINGS.


On the Orders of the Day:


CON

Robert Rogers (Minister of Public Works)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. ROGERS:

I would like to state that the architects have completed the first sketch plans of the proposed rebuilding of the House of Commons. They are on view in Room No. 1. The architects will be there between now and six o'clock, and will be glad to receive and explain the plans to any hon. members who wish to inspect them.

Topic:   PLANS OF PARLIAMENT BUILDINGS.
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COMMANDEERING OF COASTING VESSELS.


On the Orders of the Day:


LIB

William Pugsley

Liberal

Mr. PUGSLEY:

I would like to invite the attention of my right hon. friend the Prime Minister to the fact that owing, I

think, in a very considerable measure, to the fact that Canadian vessels engaged in the coasting trade, carrying coal more especially, have been requisitioned by the British Government, very serious inconvenience is being caused to people who are using coal, especially soft coal. They are carrying on various industries in the Maritime Provinces, and a continued supply of coal is of the utmost importance to them. When I was in St. John a few days ago I was told that there was a very great shortage of soft coal; indeed, there wae almost a coal famine. We have seen it stated in the newspapers that this Government is being consulted from time to time by the British Government in respect to the various matters which are of mutual interest and concern to Canada and the Empire. I would like to ask my right hon. friend if this Government is consulted as to what vessels engaged in the Canadian trade shall be requisitioned for the purposes of the Imperial Government. I was told in this connection that one vessel engaged in carrying coal from the mines to St. John was lately requisitioned by the British Government, was taken to New York, and was kept idle there for three weeks before it became, necessary for this vessel to carry the cargo for which the British Government had requisitioned it. It does seem to me that this Government ought to be consulted in regard to the commandeering or requisitioning of vessels engaged in the Canadian trade, because it is almost of as much importance that the industries of Canada should be kept constantly going and well supplied with coal as it is that vessels should be engaged in the carrying trade for the Government of Great Britain. Has the Government been consulted in reference to these matters?

Topic:   COMMANDEERING OF COASTING VESSELS.
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CON

Robert Laird Borden (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Sir ROBERT BORDEN:

The whole situation in respect of shipping is a very difficult one, because not only the British Empire but the Allied countries have to depend largely upon the shipping facilities which the Empire can furnish. As the necessities of every one of the Allied nations for a certain amount of tonnage are sometimes very urgent, my hon. friend can understand that the situation is attended with considerable difficulty so far as the British Government is concerned.

With regard to the requisitoning of ships engaged in the local trade of Canada, I entirely agree with my hon. friend that the Government of this country ought to

be consulted; and that has been the case sometimes, but not always. The view which my hon. friend has enunciated in that regard has been put forward to the British Government, and I hope that so far as the future is concerned opportunity will always be given for consultation, although I entirely realize that the necessities of the war might be so paramount that we could not refuse our consent, even though it might be attended with some inconvenience to the people of this country, and especially to our industries.

As far as the difficulty in St. John is concerned, I think the Admiralty have endeavoured to assist in every way in that regard. We have been in consultation not only with the Admiralty, but with the Director of Overseas Transport and with the Dominion Coal Company. The same difficulty has arisen at Halifax, and an effort has been made, with some success I think, to fill the temporary needs at that city as well. As far as I am advised at the present moment, the provision which has thus been made will overcome any difficulties that seem to be imminent. That is my advice as regards both St. John and Halifax. If my hon. friend would speak to me on this subject, I could give him some further information which is of a more or less confidential nature, and which it would be undesirable that I should make public at present.

Topic:   COMMANDEERING OF COASTING VESSELS.
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SHIPMENT OF SYRUPS FROM WEST


, INDIES. On the Orders of the Day:


LIB

Wilfrid Laurier (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Liberal

Sir WILFRID LAURIER:

In the absence of the Minister of Trade and Commerce the other day, I brought to the attention of the Government certain complaints made by Quebec merchants against the subsidized service given by the Royal Mail Steam Packet Company between Canada and the West Indies. The complaint was that the vessels of that line will carry sugar, but not syrups and molasses, as sugar is a more convenient and profitable cargo. Could niy hon. friend give me any information upon this subject? .

Topic:   SHIPMENT OF SYRUPS FROM WEST
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CON

George Eulas Foster (Minister of Trade and Commerce)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Sir GEORGE FOSTER:

With reference to the line plying between Canada and the West Indies, although it has four very excellent and commodious vessels, the trouble at the present time is quite distinct from the situation under pre-war conditions. Both at the West Indies end and at the Canadian end there is a congestion of freight

offering for carriage, and, although the vessels are making their voyages regularly, and carrying capacity cargoes, the freight offering is far over and above the capacity of the vessels. That makes complaints rife at both ends. Exporters in the West Indies cannot get their stuff out, and importers cannot get in the produce they have ordered from Canada; and exactly the same condition prevails at the Canadian end. I have been in close touch with the work of this company, and also with the complaints of patrons of the line. I think the company is doing everything it possibly can in the way of carrying what offers, and also in the way of distributing it as far as it possibly can so as to aid each class of its patrons and avoid filling up the vessels with the produce of one particular class only. But it is absolutely impossible for that line to carry the sugar and molasses which is lying in the West Indies on order at the present time; it is an absolute impossibility for them to overtake the amount that is required to be carried, and some other method will have to be found; such a method, for instance, as a tramp service, and I see that private parties have arranged for a schooner to bring molasses to the city of St. John. Under pressure from the department, the company is doing all it possibly can to get another vessel for that service; but the fact that more than 80 per cent of the commercial tonnage of that large company is now under requisition by the British Admiralty and in service for war purposes, and they find it almost impossible to get a vessel. I think everything is being done that possibly can be done to meet the difficulties of the situation and to serve all classes of their patrons. I have had similar complaints from Quebec and other places myself, and have tried to explain the situation to them.

Topic:   SHIPMENT OF SYRUPS FROM WEST
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LIB

Wilfrid Laurier (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Liberal

Sir WILFRID LAURIER:

The complaint which I have is that the company discriminates between the freight offering: it takes sugar in preference to molasses, because it is a more profitable and more convenient cargo.

Topic:   SHIPMENT OF SYRUPS FROM WEST
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CON

George Eulas Foster (Minister of Trade and Commerce)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Sir GEORGE FOSTER:

As far as I possibly could, I have brought before the company the necessity of proceeding upon the plan I have just stated, namely, that of distributing the freight as equally as possible among their patrons.

MILITARY DISTRICT No. 12-SASKATCHEWAN.

On the Orders of the Day:

Topic:   SHIPMENT OF SYRUPS FROM WEST
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CON

Albert Edward Kemp (Minister Without Portfolio)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. KEMP:

Yesterday my hon. friend from Saskatoon (Mr. McCraney) inquired with regard to the boundaries of certain military districts. The province of Saskatchewan has been created into a military district, to be known as No. 12, with headquarters at Regina, and a general order to that effect was approved by His Royal Highness the Governor General on the 16th instant.

Topic:   SHIPMENT OF SYRUPS FROM WEST
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LIB
CON

RELIEF OF GRAIN CONGESTION.

GRAIN ACT AMENDMENT BILL.

March 21, 1916