April 18, 1916

LIB

George William Kyte

Liberal

Mr. KYTE:

I desire to call the attention of the Acting Minister of Militia to some complaint with respect to the illness and death of Private Dugall Curry, at St. Joseph's hospital, Glace Bay, during the past week. It is alleged that Private Currie did not receive the medical treatment he was entitled to from the medical officer in charge of his regiment, and it is alleged that, owing to that neglect and the consequent delay in receiving medical treatment, his illness was increased and possibly his death resulted. I should be glad if the acting minister would make inquiry.

Topic:   D'EATH OF PRIVATE D. CURRY.
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CON

Albert Edward Kemp (Minister Without Portfolio)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. KEMP:

I will draw the attention of the Prime Minister to the matter and he will likely give an answer to the hon. gentleman to-morrow.

Topic:   D'EATH OF PRIVATE D. CURRY.
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RECRUITS FOR THE ROYAL NAVY.


On the motion of Sir Thomas White (Minister of Finance) for Committee of Supply:


LIB

Edward Mortimer Macdonald

Liberal

Mr. E. M. MACDONALD (Pictou):

I wish to direct the attention of the Minister of the Naval Service to an article in to-day's issue of the Montreal Daily Mail. This House will recall that, at an early period of the session, I ventured to press upon the attention of the House the fact that it is very desirable that in this great war Canada should play some part upon the sea as well as upon the land. I felt that, coming from a portion of the Dominion where our men were accustomed to following vocations on the sea, it would be more easy to obtain men who would volunteer for naval service than to obtain volunteers for service on the land. I see in the Daily Mail a despatch from Ottawa to the effect that the English Government have asked the Canadian Government to take steps to recruit men for service in the navy, and that a deputation, headed by Lord Alfred Guinness, is on its way out from England to interview the Government with regard to this question. It was urged by -hon. gentlemen opposite, when I mentioned the matter, that such a thing as recruiting men in Canada to serve in the navy would be entirely unnecessary, that they were not required, that England did not need in her navy any one from this country. Will the Minister of the Naval Service tell us if this despatch is correct, and if it is the intention of this Govern. ment to proceed to call for recruits to serve in the British Navy? ,

Topic:   RECRUITS FOR THE ROYAL NAVY.
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CON

John Douglas Hazen (Minister of Marine and Fisheries; Minister of the Naval Service)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Hon. J. D. HAZEN (Minister of the Naval Service):

Mr. Speaker, -some time

ago, when I spoke to the motion for papers referred to by my hon friend, I referred to the fact that the British Government had asked us if we could obtain the enlistment of about 200 men capable of taking charge of motor boats. They asked us to have it made known that they would enlist a certain number for that purpose, and to receive applications; and they said they would send out a commission from the Admiralty to make selections from the number offering. We have done that. We have advised the Admiralty of the fact and we are informed that the Hon. Rupert Guinness and another gentleman are now on their way here to consult us in regard to that matter. I may say further that they have intimated that they are willing, if we can get volunteers for the purpose, to take into the British navy a certain number of men who would enlist at the British rate of pay and subject to British conditions. That infor-

mation was furnished to us only within the past few days, and we are now taking steps to make that fact known so that any of our seamen who are anxious to enlist in the British navy will be able to make application to, us, and when the Hon. Rupert Guinness arrives here the matter will be submitted to him. I suppose that the newspaper item to which my hon. friend refers is something along that line, but I have not yet seen it.

Topic:   RECRUITS FOR THE ROYAL NAVY.
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LIB

William Pugsley

Liberal

Hon. WILLIAM PUGSLEY:

As my hon. fri'end from Pietou will not have another opportunity to speak, I shall read the despatch which appears in the Montreal Daily Mail. It is a despatch from Ottawa as follows :

Canada to recruit for British Navy.

Ottawa, April 17.-The British Admiralty wants recruits in Canada for the navy and a recruiting party headed by * Hon. Rupert Guinness is on its way across the Atlantic. The party will be in Ottawa in the course of a few days. Only seafaring men are required as recruits and the rates of pay, pensions and separation allowances will be those in force in the Royal Navy.

It is expected that the Canadian Patriotic Fund will take care that the emolument to the dependents of the Canadian sailors will be made up to the standard of the militia.

The limit of age is 40 and the period of engagement will be the duration of the war. Persons resident in the maritime provinces who wish to join should as a preliminary step send their names and addresses to the Superintendent H.M.C. dockyard, Halifax; those resident in British Columbia, Alberta and Saskatchewan to the Superintendent H.M.C. dockyard. Esquimau, and those in the remaiing provinces to the Secretary Department of Naval Service, Ottawa.

Beyond the regular naval service the recruiting party wants recruits for the auxiliary patrol service of the Admiralty. This is a motor boat service which has turned out to be one of the most valuable of the navy.

That information would seem to be somewhat more definite and autheni'c than the remarks of the 'Minister of Marine and Fisheries would lead one to suppose. It would rather seem as though some one in Ottawa, probably connected with the department, had more information as to the mission upon which these gentlemen are coming from England than my hon. friend the Minister of the Naval Service himself.

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CON

John Douglas Hazen (Minister of Marine and Fisheries; Minister of the Naval Service)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. HAZEN:

It is exactly the information which I have given the House.

Topic:   RECRUITS FOR THE ROYAL NAVY.
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LIB

William Pugsley

Liberal

Mr. PUGSLEY:

No. While the Minister of the Naval Service puts the idea of recruiting sailors for the Admiralty as secondary to the question of getting men to man motor boats, this article puts the

question of recruiting for the navy ahead as being the supreme matter in regard to which this commission is coming from England and the question of manning motor boats is one of ah entirely secondary character.

* While upon my feet, I wieh to express my regret at the half-hearted way in which the Minister of Naval Service speaks of the idea of recruiting Canadians for service in the British navy. He says that any persons desirous of entering the Admiralty service will be requested to send in their names, and will be given an opportunity of serving. I think that from the beginning of the war this Government has been remiss in its duty in not encouraging our young men to offer their services to the British Admiralty. Of course, we on this side of the House have always been in favour of starting a Canadian navy, which would be of assistance both to Canada and to the Empire. Failing that, I think, as many other hon. gentlemen on this side of the House think, that this Government ought to have taken hold of the question in a whole-hearted and enthusiastic manner. We have thousands, scores of thousands, of young men in Canada, living on the shores of the Great Lakes, who are accustomed to navigation; thousands of young men upon, the coasts of both the Atlantic and Pacific oceans; thousands of young men engaged in the . fisheries, who would be delighted to have an opportunity of entering the service of the Admiralty. But, from the very beginning of the war until now, they have received no encouragement, and to-day the remarks of my hon. friend the Minister of Marine and Fisheries are made in a halfhearted way. He says that if the British Government want our young men, and they want to go, they will be allowed to go; that permission will be given to them to serve the Empire in this splendid service. I do not think that that is the right spirit in which this question should be approached. This Government should have entered into an arrangement with the British Government to enable our young men to receive in the naval service pay commensurate with that which our young men serving in the army are receiving, and should have encouraged them to enter the Admiralty service. It should always be borne in mind that our young men, engaged in the naval service of the Empire would be engaged in the service of Canada, for Canada is almost in the centre of the Empire, and what benefits the Empire

benefits Canada. Every effort has been put forth, with enthusiasm and with zeal, to encourage our young men to serve in the army; but no similar effort has been made to encourage them to serve in the navy, and that is a branch of the service in which, as I have said, many thousands of our young men would feel it an honour to serve.

I am glad that hon. gentlemen opposite are coming to reason. Perhaps the minister will allow me to say, without offence, that I trust they will wake up to the necessities of the situation. We know how hampered this Government has been.. I know what has hampered it, and every member of this House, and the people of this country, know what has hampered it in regard to doing anything to assist in the naval service of the Empire. They know that this Government pledged itself before the elections of 1911 to abstain, as far as possible, from having anything to do with the naval service of the Empire. I trust that the gentlemen who are coming from England will be able to do something to wake the Government from its lethargy, so far as this important branch of the service is concerned, and that something really beneficial will result from the efforts of the committee who are proposing to visit Canada.

Topic:   RECRUITS FOR THE ROYAL NAVY.
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CANADA'S TRADE AND COMMERCE.


On the motion for Committee of Supply:


CON

George Eulas Foster (Minister of Trade and Commerce)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Sir GEORGE FOSTER (Minister of Trade and Commerce):

I am going to ask the House this afternoon, before taking up my Estimates, to listen to a short statement which I think may be of some interest in connection with the trade and commerce of the country. I am not making any apology for asking the House to listen to me for a few moments on this matter, as I think it is one of very great importance, and one to which, probably, neither side of the House has devoted that amount of time, energy, and attention which 224 representatives of Canada, comprising business men, men of capacity, men of influence, men of ripe and extended views, men of great experience in commercial and business matters, might have found it profitable to devote.

I do not believe that any of us in this House, or that any one in the country quite appreciates the tremendous transition which is to take place in this country some time soon when war ceases ,and peace commences, a transition rendered necessary because

Topic:   CANADA'S TRADE AND COMMERCE.
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REVISED


of the diversion that has taken place along certain lines since the war began. At the risk of repeating something of the sentiments, if not the words which I have already expressed in this House, I am going to call the attention of the House to a few prominent features of the situation. What has happened in this country since August, 1914 ? The happenings have been gradual and, therefore, they have not impressed themselves upon our minds with the same force as if, instead of being gradual, they had come suddenly. But they are none the less important and none the less grave because they have been gradual. TJp to the present time, 300,000 5 p.m. adults have been drawn from the fields of industry, from the factory, the business house, the farm, the mine, and the fisheries. These have been abstracted from productive work in these lines, and if this war continues for a year, or a year and a half more, 500,000 adults will have been been abstracted from productive work in this country. Now, if the Minister" of the Interior had come to this House two years ago and stated that he could promise that within a year there would be an immigration into this country of men like ourselves, representing an addition of 250,000 adults to the working forces of Canada, he would have made a statement such as had never been made in Canada, or in any other country in the world. And if he had followed that up with the statement that in the succeeding year there would be an immigration of men like ourselves, knowing our institutions, understanding our laws, familiar with our social, intellectual, and moral habits, adding in the course of two years 500,000 working adults to the productive power of this country, that would have been a statement surpassing in interest and gravity the one to which I have just alluded. But does it make any difference whether the statement shall be made in that form or shall be in the inverse form, that in two years during which this war shall have been carried on 500,000 adults shall have been abstracted from the productive forces of this country? That is the first point to consider and it is one which I would like the country to consider very carefully. More than that, during those same two years som-filling else has been taking place. There has Deen a diversion from productive, beneficent labour into lines of labour and work which are not beneficent and productive, but which are malefficient and hurtful. Tens upon tens of thousands of


EDITION


men have been diverted from normal and beneficent, productive work in this country and have been set to the work of making munitions of war for the purposes of the destruction of life and property. In this destruction of life and property, the only redeeming thing which can be said about it is that they are defending the life and liberties of the Empire and fighting for the cause of human freedom and liberty. But from the economic point of view, my argument stands that this diversion has taken place. Something more has taken place in that time. Not only has there been this diversion and abstraction of productive labour, but there has been no compensating inflowing current of immigration. To a young country like our own, a country situated as Canada is, that is one great source of growth and advancing strength and prosperity. Outside of the natural increase, and coming from suitable sources, the strength and prosperity of the country are enhanced by an inflowing population, adults and others, which mingles itself with, and becomes co-operative in the production and development of the country. For these two years of, war a very small amount of that current has flowed in and Canada is bereft of the invigorating and progressive force and enterprise which are derived from such sources. But, in addition, capital and equipment and capital for the purposes of equipment have been diverted to and employed in the work of making munitions of war and therefore is not employed in normal productive industries. This is a factor which has also to be reckoned with. In addition, financial conditions will have been so changed that when peace comes we shall be met with a different situation as regards enterprise and industry from that which existed before the war. Money will be harder to get, interest will be higher, the cost of Government and of administration will be enhanced and all these are factors in the obtaining of capital and in the working out of enterprises for which capital is necessary. Now, you 6ay that this labour, or a great deal with it, will return. Let us consider some factors in regard to this. Of these 500,000 adults who will have gone from our country some, unfortunately, will never return. That will foe human energy entirely lost to this country. Another considerable portion of those who return will be totally, or partially, disabled and will therefore be, in one way, a burden which we will all love to bear, but yet an economic burden upon the country; or they will be reduced in point of worth and efficiency in the productive work of the country. The men who come back after two years of the life in the trenches, with all the strain, the nervous and physical shock, the endurances and privation of war, will be different from the men they were before they went to the war. Wil'l these men quickly settle down to normal operations? Will they be as effective as they were before? Any way there will be a period, more or less lengthened, during which there will be a process of adaptation and of change from the old- though it is only two years old-to the new and something like the normal conditions that preceded it. Now, this is just a rough statement of the facts upon one side of the case. Are we thinking about this situation which faces us when the war stops? The moment the war stops the doors of every munition factory will be closed and the help that was gathered, and which worked therein, will have to find some other employment. When the munition factories stop, the thousand and one subsidiary operations which spread themselves through the length and breadth of the country, connected by more or less subtle threads with the dominant work of forming munitions of war, will also come to a standstill, and these two working together will bring about a period during which reversion to normal, adaptation to circumstances as they then exist, will eat up time, will confuse and disturb energy and will have its effect upon the economic condition and development of the country. These are the things that face us. , Whilst we are glad to see the munition works doing their part in supplying the Empire with that which is necessary, whilst we are glad to have the money which comes as a sequence to the employment, yet all this is not beneficent and productive work and when it stops-yes, before it stops-well before it stops-the people of this country should be putting on their thinking caps, sizing up the situation and getting ready for the inevitable and important change that is to come. The first duty of this House and of the people of the country is simply to face that situation, to get right down before it, face it, think it out and be prepared with plans and organization as to what shall be done when the time arrives. That is the first duty of us all. In the next place, I will you allow me, Mr. Speaker, to call your attention to another phase of the question, and that is: what are the practical things that can be done and to what extent are we doing these practical things? And now I make an acknowledgment to the House: that is, that I feel the duty and necessity of saying a few words about my own department, the Department of Trade ahd Commerce. I have not projected that department nor myself before this House nor before the country; I have been very modest with reference to the work that was going on. I have come to the conclusion that I have been a little too modest and that maybe my department has not taken that place in the minds of hon. gentlemen to which it is rightly entitled. I do not speak in this way from any personal vanity, or any personal regret; but I would like the people of this country and ihe members of this House to know something of what we really have been doing; and I speak in order that my department may not only have their sympathy but also their active help and co-operation. So, I know, Mr. Speaker, you will pardon the allusion that I am about to make to my own department. One of the things that I think we ought to do, and may well do, is to take stock of the situation in Canada as it will probably tie when peace comee. What is it in the Dominion of Canada that we shall consume, that we shall find necessary for our daily wants? To what extent can that be produced in Canada, and to what extent must we depend upon outside countries for these supplies? First-and I am not going to labour the point, for I wish to finish my remarks by six o'clock-I think that the thing we ought to do is to sit down and take stock of the resources and of the wants of the country. And with this idea-that, knowing what we require, and knowing how much is produced by ourselves at the present time, and for how much of it we have to depend upon foreign countries, we may, in a business way, set ourselves as Canadiaip to the solution of the problem of our wants. And I think the most accurate statistics that it is possible to have on that subject should be within the departments in Ottawa, and more especially within my own department, and should be there for the use of the House and of the business men of the country-information, comprehensive, accurate and fresh, as the foundation for the active work of dealing with this problem. The next thing I think it is necessary 189} for us to do, and which my department is trying to do, and I think is pretty effectively doing, is to find out in what fields outside of Canada goods that are made in Canada, and the products raised in Canada, may find sale and consumption. There .are business enterprises and aggregations of capital which may better busy themselves with the home market of Canada, and with that only. There are other aggregations of enterprise and capital which may better busy themselves entirely in providing for the foreign markets. And there are other aggregations of capital and enterprise that may most economically combine both, and, making a base of the home market, extend their trade to the supply of foreign countries and thus diminish the incidence of overhead and general expenses upon their total trade. So, my department, while I have had charge of it-and as it commenced before, and I hope will continue-is particularly occupied with that problem. Through what media? In the first place, we have the medium of the Trade Commissioners whom we now have in every important district of the United Kingdom, in the overseas dominions, and in such foreign countries as it has seemed best, up to the present time, to enter. These trade commissioners are, I believe I can say without exaggeration, doing their business on the whole excellently well, and some of them deserve all the praise that can possibly be given them for the energy, the capacity, and the success with which they are carrying on their work. These trade commissioners are diligently engaged, from the first of January to the thirty-first of December in every year, gathering information in the districts to which they are accredited and the areas to which their work applies. They are gathering that information judiciously, and not simply sending in anything which would make a paragraph or a report. They send in weekly and monthly reports, and these reports are carefully edited and published in our bulletin, and in that form sent out weekly to now some 6,000 or 8,000 of selected business men in the different parts of Canada. It has been a source of great gratification to me to receive the kind words and hearty endorsation of business men in every part of Canada, testifying to the interest with which these bulletins are regarded as welcome, helpful and profitable visitors to their offices and their homes. But the trade commissioners are assisted, and the scope of the whole system is widened by the privilege which we have,



the right we have at the present time as Canadians, to call upon the commercial intelligence branches of the British consular service in every part of the world. These officials are not only instructed from the Foreign Office, but from the communications I have had, they are willingly and cheerfully throwing themselves into the work, and providing ua with such information as they think will be of use, such information as is asked of them by Canadian merchants and by my own department. So, special reports asked for by my department are obtained from all these countries upon special subjects, from the intelligence department of the British consular service. That gives us a much wider scope than if we had simply our own trade commissioners. Then, there are special and travelling commissioners. As the House will probably remember, I appointed a special commissioner to the West India Islands, who spent nearly a year and a half in those islands, went through them thoroughly, possessed himself of the information which was there to be obtained and which was particularly adapted for the purposes and the needs of Canada, and has lately published a report. I do not know whether all members of this House of Commons have seen it or not, but if any member would like to see it I would be glad to put it in his possession. It is a book upon the West Indies, and it embodies the result of his travels, his observations, and his advice with reference to trade.


LIB
CON

George Eulas Foster (Minister of Trade and Commerce)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Sir GEORGE FOSTER:

Mr. Watson

Griffin. Within the last few months I have also had prepared a resume of the distinctive energies of Canada in production, both natural and industrial, a sort of vade mecum for our outside commissioners, people in foreign countries, British consuls and others into whose hands we put it, destined to answer this question: Is there anything that you want to know about Canada? If there is, here is a book in which you will find something in reference to it. If you want more information, you will know where to apply for it, and get it in detail.

Topic:   EDITION
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LIB

April 18, 1916