September 5, 1917

CON

Hugh Boulton Morphy

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. MORPHY:

They have them and

they are using them. It is time for the Government to strike out those extensions which they have been coaxed to strike out. Why should the Government leave them in the estimates? Hon. gentlemen opposite represent the people there; they know what their constituents want, and they say those extensions are of no use to the electors, ratepayers, and citizens of various constituencies in Nova Scotia. Under the circumstances, I would for once go over the heads of the department who have recommended those public benefits and say to the hon. member for Guysborough (Mr. Sinclair): All right, we will cut out your extension telegraph service; and I would say the same to the hon. member for Inverness (Mr. Chisholm).

Topic:   SUPPLY.
Permalink
LIB

Alexander William Chisholm

Liberal

Mr. CHISHOLM:

I am heartily in accord with the idea of continuing the ex-penditurey The hon. gentleman is wrong when he includes me with the other hon. members.

Topic:   SUPPLY.
Permalink
CON

Hugh Boulton Morphy

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. MORPHY:

I will leave my hon.

friend to fight it out w-ith his fellow members on the other side. I take from his statement the argument that the extension is of some service in at least one county

Topic:   SUPPLY.
Permalink
LIB
CON

Hugh Boulton Morphy

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. MORPHY:

-and that the extensions are desired and required. I would out out all the extensions except that one in the county of Inverness, on the request of the hon. members who represent those counties. The money could be saved and sent up to the province of Ontario, as extensions are very badly needed in some of the northern sections in which the inhabitants are labouring under greater disadvanages than are the people of Nova Scotia. If there is any legal way of, accomplishing this, the minister should strike out all those other extensions now and give extensions' in the northern parts of Ontario where they are much more needed.

Topic:   SUPPLY.
Permalink
LIB
LIB

Daniel Duncan McKenzie

Liberal

Mr. McKENZIE:

The hon. member is

altogether wrong in saying that I oppose any accommodation to the people in my county of North Cape Breton and Victoria. The

wrong infcrmation was given to me by the minister. Inadvertently he told me he was going to put in three miles of telephone line at the end of about 100 miles of telegraph line. I could not understand the sense of putting in three miles of telephone line which would have no connection with any telephone system. After a little further inquiry, the minister and I discovered that this was merely a three-mile extension of the telegraph system in the county, and with that I am perfectly satisfied. I did however, combat the idea of building three miles of a telephone line all by itself with no earthly connection with any other telephone line and of no use to anybody. Those telegraph lines in the northern part of Victoria and throughout Cape Breton were put in by our own friends when we were in power, and we are not going to find fault with them to-day.

New Brunswick telegraph and telephone lines -Chatham-Escuminac and Point Sapin telephone line-extension to Kouchibouguac, $3,000.

Topic:   SUPPLY.
Permalink
CON

John Dowsley Reid (Minister of Customs)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. REID:

The superintendent states that this extension is required in order to reach the fishery establishment at Kouehi-bouguac.

Topic:   SUPPLY.
Permalink
LIB
CON
LIB

Frank Broadstreet Carvell

Liberal

Mr. CARVELL:

As I am afraid there may be some connection between the W. S. Loggie Co. Limited and the hon. member for Northumberland, I want to put myself straight on the situation. I am just as strongly opposed to this vote as I was to the vote in regard to Nova Scotia, or as I will be in regard to the votes in regard to Quebec and British Columbia. I have never been on the ground actually myself, but, as I understand, perhaps 30 or 40 years ago the Federal Government built a telegraph line from Chatham, down the south bank of the Miramiohi river, running out to a point at the mouth of the Miramichi river called Point Escuminac. This line was extended to Point Sapin. It was for many years run as a telegraph line, and no doubt was of very great value, because it was used in connection with shipping; the arrival and departure of vessels being telegraphed to Chatham and in that way reached headquarters at Ottawa. I have never been at this place myself and, therefore, I cannot speak with the knowledge of the toon, gentleman from Northumberland, but I know that the New Brunswick Tele-

phone Company goes to Escun^jpac, and has a line to Kouchibouguac. It seems this is a proposal to extend the line beyond the point at which the Government line of telephone comes in contact *with the 'New Brunswick line.

Topic:   SUPPLY.
Permalink
CON

John Dowsley Reid (Minister of Customs)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. REID:

Do I understand that when this is constructed it will join up (the present Government system?

Topic:   SUPPLY.
Permalink
LIB

Frank Broadstreet Carvell

Liberal

Mr. CARVELL:

No, they are joined up now. Some years ago the telegraph line was converted into a telephone line, and an arrangement was made with the New Brunswick Telephone Company by which there was interchange of service. I do not remember the details, but I think it was satisfactory to both companies, as they come together at Kouchibouguac. This proposal is that the Government shall extend 10 or 12 miles further down the bay. I aim opposed to it.

Topic:   SUPPLY.
Permalink
CON
LIB
CON

Ferdinand Joseph Robidoux

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. ROBIDOUX:

I trust the minister

will not treat too seriously the abuse which has been heaped on the Government telephone lines by hon. gentlemen opposite. I happen to know about that part of the line to which my hon. friend refers. It extends from Chatham to Point Sapin, part iu Northumberland county, and part in Kent county. It i's about 50 or GO miles in length, and the proposition is now t-*. extend it from Point Sapin to the Kouchibouguac river, following the shore, through districts spars-ley settled, and altogether out of communication with the rest of the world. The people who live along the shore are engaged in fishing and the telephone service is their only means of communication with the outside world. The hon. member for Carleton (Mr. Carvell) referred to the New Brunswick Telephone Company, and the readiness of that company to do anything they could to give telephone facilities to the people of New Brunswick. I do not know how telephone companies act in other parts of the Dominion. But I want to say that in New Brunswick, so far as telephones are concerned, we have one of the worst monopolies in the Dominion of Canada. We formerly had two companies in New Brunswick, the Central 'Telephone Company and the New Brunswick Telephone Company. I do not know to which company the hon, gentleman belongs, but today competition has been absolutely abolished by the absorption of the Central Telephone Company by the New Brunswick Telephone Company. The hon. gentleman has stated that the New Brunswick Telephone Company was always ready to come to the rescue of people who desired telephone communication and I desire to say that that is not so. I know a number of irstances where applications were made to the New Brunswick Telephone Company to extend their lines to different localities

and They would n-ot give the people these facilities. The New Brunswick Telephone Company was generous enough to say to the people: You put up the poles, we will put up the wire, and the line will belong to us. That was the basis upon which they were prepared to give telephone communication to these people. The proposed line will end at Kouchibouguac beach. It does not connect in any way with the New Brunswick Telephone line at Kouchibouguac; it connects with the main line at Chatham, and gives very valuable service to the people of that section of the country; the government will be well advised, if they extend the system further whenever needed. Reference has been made to the amount paid for rental om these lines, and the $4.50 rate has been considered ridiculous by gentlemen opposite. Well, $4.50 at first sight is ridiculous, but it is not quite so ridiculous when you take into consideration the fact that by paying $4.50 you merely get communication with Chatham, and the localities along that line, which I say are sparsely settled.

Topic:   SUPPLY.
Permalink
LIB
CON

Ferdinand Joseph Robidoux

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. ROBIDOUX:

60 miles of communication through wilderness, and the New Brunswick Company would not, under any consideration, undertake to build the line there, and the moment you reach Chatham if you want to communicate with any other portion of the province you must pay 25 cents to the New Brunswick Telephone Company. If you were to telephone into Chatham, in order- to get your connection with the town of Chatham you must pay a pretty heavy toll. The Department of Public Works would be well advised not to pay too much consideration to all this howl which is raised against their telephone lines, which are giving good service to a portion of the population, which would not get any service at all were it not for those lines.

Topic:   SUPPLY.
Permalink
LIB

Frank Broadstreet Carvell

Liberal

Mr. CARVELL:

I do not want to go into a dissertation about the vices or virtues of this telephone company, because I would be very much out of order. I want to say to the hon. gentleman, however, and I am very glad to have an opportunity of making this statement to-day, that the New Brunswick Telephone Company has no monopoly in any portion of the province pf New Brunswick, Any person or any company who can get the rights from the municipal authorities is absolutely free to parallel the lines of the New Brunswick Telephone Company at any place. We have competition in many parts of the province, and we encourage the construction of local companies wherever we can. In many cases we hand over certain territory to those people and say: Now, develop it.

When I hear of the trouble they are having in Ontario in regard to telephone companies, I think there must be something wrong, either with the Bell Telephone Company or with the local companies, because we have no friction whatever in the province of New Brunswick. My hon. friend speaks about the charges made. It may surprise him to learn that in the province of New Brunswick we have the cheapest telephone service in the Dominion, and we have the finest example in Canada of what can be done by a properly organized and properly conducted public utility corporation. We have no mortgages and no bonds, and a very small capitalization.

Topic:   SUPPLY.
Permalink
CON

September 5, 1917