September 15, 1917

CON

Charles Joseph Doherty (Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. DOHERTY:

In Montreal and, I

think, the larger cities, the intention was that the particular location should be determined by the Registrar, after making inquiry to see what would best suit the convenience of everybody. It is not as easy to fix particular locations in a city as it would be in villages and towns. The intention was that the Registrar should make arrangements for suitable places, and then we would give special notice as to the exact locations.

Topic:   TRIBUNALS UNDER MILITARY SERVICE ACT, 1917.
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LIB
CON

Charles Joseph Doherty (Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. DOHERTY:

I have already stated

in answer to the hon. member for Russell (Mr. Murphy) that if conditions show additional tribunals are required they will be provided. This can be done under the statute.

Topic:   TRIBUNALS UNDER MILITARY SERVICE ACT, 1917.
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LIB

Jacques Bureau

Liberal

Mr. BUREAU:

Might I ask the minister if the population has been taken into account in the establishment of these tribunals, and if so, how many thousands of population has been determined upon as being entitled to a tribunal?

Topic:   TRIBUNALS UNDER MILITARY SERVICE ACT, 1917.
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CON

Charles Joseph Doherty (Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. DOHERTY:

If my memory serves

me oqrrectly, it was estimated that there should be, generally speaking, a tribunal for about 7,500 of population. Of course, in the larger cities it would not be necessary to 'have as many as that would represent, because of the greater density of population and the greater facility with which people could reach the places established. I understand it was estimated that for every 7,500 of population the largest number of men who would be liable to this call would be about 500. Every one, I presume, will not ask for exemption and 500 ought to be, the maximum of the possible cases which one tribunal would be called upon to deal with.

Topic:   TRIBUNALS UNDER MILITARY SERVICE ACT, 1917.
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L-C

Samuel Hughes

Liberal-Conservative

Sir SAM HUGHES:

I understood that a tribunal, if they had a large population or area, could meet in one part of the tribunal area and then move to another without any higher authority intervening?

Topic:   TRIBUNALS UNDER MILITARY SERVICE ACT, 1917.
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CON

Charles Joseph Doherty (Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. DOHERTY:

They will have authority to move from one part to another where there is a sufficient gathering of people at different parts and where such movement will more effectually meet the general convenience.

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L-C
LIB

Charles Arthur Gauvreau

Liberal

Mr. GAUVREAU:

Will that only be in the large cities or will it apply to the rural districts also? In Temiscouata there are five tribunals and they are quite distant from each other. Could one of these tribunals proceed to another place and sit there at any time it liked?

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CON

Charles Joseph Doherty (Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. DOHERTY:

Yes, any of the tribunals will be authorized to move from place to place when the exigencies require it. The purpose is to settle the location which shall be the headquarters of the tribunal.

Topic:   TRIBUNALS UNDER MILITARY SERVICE ACT, 1917.
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LIB

Jacques Bureau

Liberal

Mr. BUREAU:

The minister says that it is supposed that no more than 500, out of 7,500, will make an application and that in the cities, the population being denser, they will not have to go far to get to a tribunal. It is not only the question of how far they will have to travel to get to the tribunal that I am interested in for there is also the question of the time taken,to hoar the applications. The question raised by my hon. friend from Temiscouata is a proper one. Take cities such as Hull, Sherbrooke, Three Rivers, Shawinigan or Grand'Mere, which have a population of from 22,000 to 23,000. It would not be so much the inconvenience of getting there as it would be the question of the time that the people would require to take to submit their evidence and have their applications settled. How many tribunals are there in Three Rivers which has a population of 22,000? There are a great many people working in the mills. We have the munition factories, paper mills and various other industries. There should be quite a number of applications. I do not think one tribunal of the kind mentioned in the proclamation will be sufficient. I do not think proper time will be afforded to give due consideration to all the applications. My demand for information is not so much as to the distance to be covered by eacft one who desires to go before the tribunal as it is to the time which it will take to enable the people to .make their applications and to have them properly considered.

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CON

Charles Joseph Doherty (Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. DOHERTY:

There is no finality

about this list. Tribunals may be established from time to time and after the tribunals have proceeded to their operations, if there is reason to believe that there ;s need for further tribunals, they will be provided. I was under the impression that there was more than one tribunal provided for Three Rivers but I do not speak with any certainty. My own impression would be that more than one tribunal would be required but I will make inquiry. These

things have not been dealt with personally by me but the hon. member can feel quite satisfied that a sufficient number will be provided.

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LIB

William Pugsley

Liberal

Mr. PUGSLEY:

I notice that in St. John county the parish of St. Martin's has been omitted altogether. Perhaps the minister will take notice of it? I think the Minister of Marine (Mr. Hazen) will agree that there should be a tribunal in St. Martin's. There is one in the parish of Simond's but St. Martin's is a very important section of the county.

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CON

John Douglas Hazen (Minister of Marine and Fisheries; Minister of the Naval Service)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. HAZEN:

They thought maybe, that one tribunal would be sufficient for the two parishes of St. Martin's and Simond's. 1 would be disposed to believe that the parish of St. Martin's being the more distant there should be a further tribunal for that parish. It might suit the convenience of the people of Simond's to come into the city because they all come in to do their business. However, I think the matter ought to be looked into.

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LIB

Charles Murphy

Liberal

Mr. MURPHY:

There has been an intimation in the newspapers that a scale of fees has been determined, for the members of the local tribunals. Is that correct?

. Mr. DOHERTY: The matter has not been absolutely settled but I will be able to give the hon. gentleman a positive answer on Monday.

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L-C
CON

Charles Joseph Doherty (Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. DOHERTY:

It is a question of remuneration of some description.

PRIVILEGE. .

Statement by Mr. Boivin denying imputations.

On the Orders of the Day:

Topic:   TRIBUNALS UNDER MILITARY SERVICE ACT, 1917.
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LIB

Georges Henri Boivin

Liberal

Mr. G. H. BOIVIN (Shefford):

Mr. Speaker, I rise to a question of privilege. In his remarks last evening the hon. member for Kingston (Mr. Nickle) is reported in Hansard to have spoken as follows:

I was surprised the other night to listen to the speech of the hon. gentleman from Shefford (Mr. Boivin), who seemed to treat with scorn the sacrifices which the relatives of the sol

diers had made in this war. He said they stayed at home and drew separation allowances from the Patriotic Fund. He must have come from a district where men have not gone overseas in large numbers.

The hon. member for Haldimand (Mr. Lalor) also used somewhat similar language. I would ask these hon. gentlemen to read my remarks in Hansard of Monday last,

'and they will be convinced that I did not treat with scorn the sacrifices made by the relatives of soldiers. In my remarks I was making a comparison between the sacrifice made by some soldier's wives and the other women of Canada, who, since the beginning of the war, have given of their time, energy, and means to the cause of the soldiers, but who have had no sons to offer to the cause.

I realize as well as any hon. member of this House, with the probable exception of those who have sons of their own at the front, the enormous sacrifice which mothers and sisters must make to see their loved ones take up arms in defence of the Empire. I resent such interpretation being put upon -my remarks, and such imputation being cast upon me, that I would ever think of treating with -scorn the sacrifices made by the relatives of soldiers.

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WAR TAX UPON INCOMES.

RULING BY MR. SPEAKER ON THE RIGHT OF THE SENATE TO AMEND A MONEY BILL-AMENDMENTS MADE BY THE SENATE CONCURRED IN.

September 15, 1917