April 15, 1920

L LIB

Henri-Edgar Lavigueur

Laurier Liberal

Mr. H. E. LAVIGUEUR (Quebec County):

With your permission, Mr. Speaker, and with the permission of the House, I rise to a question of privilege. I wish to draw to the attention of the House a certain article which has appeared in all the newspapers of this country. This article, as published in the Quebec Daily Chronicle of the 13th instant, reads:

Judge Lennox makes unfortunate remark. Learning that witness could not speak English, said he ought to be deported. Montreal Quebec, April 12-

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UNION

Edgar Nelson Rhodes (Speaker of the House of Commons)

Unionist

Mr. SPEAKER:

Does the article in question refer to the hon. member?

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L LIB

Henri-Edgar Lavigueur

Laurier Liberal

Mr. LAVIGUEUR:

The article is an insult to the French population of this country.

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UNION

Edgar Nelson Rhodes (Speaker of the House of Commons)

Unionist

Mr. SPEAKER:

Order. The hon. gentleman would not be in ordeT in bringing up such a matter as a question of privilege.

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L LIB

LETTER CARRIERS' SALARIES.


i On the Orders of the Day:


UNION
UNION

Newton Wesley Rowell (Minister presiding over the Department of Health; President of the Privy Council)

Unionist

Hon. N. W. ROWELL (President of the Council):

The Government has made

answer to the request, and it is necessary that I should state the request so that the House will understand the answer. Under the old classification, the maximum and minimum salaries of the letter carriers were $939 and $636 respectively. Under the new classification the maximum and minimum will be $1,260 and $780 respectively. Both these figures are apart from the bonus. In the application of the classification the letter carriers who were receiving the maximum of the old classification, namely, $939, receive under the new classification the' salary at the-scale next above that which they were receiving, namely, $1,020, so that all who were receiving $939, the maximum under the old classification, will start in at $1,020 under the new classification as of April 1, 1919. But where men had been in

receipt of the maximum for five years and had, therefore, not received any statutory increases they will be moved up one step further, and instead of receiving $1,020, the will start in at $1,140, and as the classification is to be made retroactive to the 1st April, 1919, that means that they will start in at $1,140 as from the 1st April of last year. Those who have not been in receipt of the maximum for five years will start in at $1,020. The delegation that waited on the Government represented men who had attained the maximum, but had not enjoyed it for a period of five years. They made two requests, first, that all who had attained the maximum under the old classification should immediately be given the maximum under the new. That is, they should be moved up from $939 to $1,260, as from April 1, 1919, which with the married man's bonus would make a total of $1,656 for last year, or in the alternative, if they did not get the maximum under the new classification as of 1st April, 1919, those who had attained the maximum under the old classification, whether they had served five years or notr should start in at $1,140 as from the 1st April, 1919, which would give them with the married man's bonus $1,656 for this year. The Government could not see its way clear to comply with either request, and so advised the letter carriers. As already intimated if they were married men or heads of households, they received in addition to salary, $420 as a bonus last year, if unmarried the single man's bonus, both of which will be continued during the current year. The men who waited on the Government will receive this year $1,140 in salary as they will move up one step in the classification owing to its being made retroactive to the 1st April, 1919, and, if they are married men or heads of households, they will be entitled to a bonus of $420, making their salary and bonus $1,560, and if unmarried, $1,332. The Government felt that, in justice to the other branches of the service and in view of the charges upon the public treasury, that amount was reasonable compensation for the service rendered. The Government further thought that the men who had served for five years at the old maximum and who, during that period of five years, had not received any statutory increase, were entitled to the special recognition of being moved one step in advance of those who had not had that long period of service and these men if married will receive this year $1,656. If unmarried $1,422.

It was also explained to the letter carriers, and I think I should mention it to the fMr. Rowell.]

House that the effect of dating the reclassification back to the 1st April, 1919, means that the civil servants will, for the year 1919, receive a sum of approximately $4,000,000 more than they received under the old classification, and that sum will have to be provided for by Estimates this session in order to pay them that additional amount with respect to last year's work.

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UNION

Thomas Joseph Stewart

Unionist

Mr. T. J. STEWAKT:

I understood that ,all the letter carriers who were getting $939 ,and $1,020, and who had been given no in-,crease for the five years previous went Jto $1,140

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UNION

Edgar Nelson Rhodes (Speaker of the House of Commons)

Unionist

Mr. SPEAKER:

Order. If the hon. member wishes to submit a question to the Government, that is one thing, but if he wishes to submit his opinion with ' respect to a statement made by the minister he is certainly not in order.

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UNION

Thomas Joseph Stewart

Unionist

Mr. T. J. STEWART:

I do not know,

Mr. Speaker, whether you understood me aright or not. I wanted to know with reference to what the minister stated

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UNION

Edgar Nelson Rhodes (Speaker of the House of Commons)

Unionist

Mr. SPEAKER:

The minister's statement stands for what it is worth. .

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UNION
UNION

Edgar Nelson Rhodes (Speaker of the House of Commons)

Unionist

Mr. SPEAKER:

The hon. gentleman would be in order in putting his own interpretation on a statement made by the ^Minister, but certainly nut upon the Orders of the Day.

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ALLEGED STATEMENT BY JUSTICE LENNOX.


On the Orders of the Day being called:


L LIB

Charles Arthur Gauvreau

Laurier Liberal

Mr. C. A. IGAUVREAU (Temiscouata) (translation.):

Mr. Speaker, may I ask the right hon. Minister of Justice whether it is his intention to 'have an inquiry made about the insulting remarks of Justice Lennox, or at least to ask him a report stating whether it is true or not that he has uttered those words?

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UNION

Charles Joseph Doherty (Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada)

Unionist

Rt. Hon. C. J. DOHERTY (Minister of Justice) (translation.):

I shall make inquiry about the facts connected with the incident referred to by the hon. member. But I may say that judges are not under the jurisdiction of the (Minister of Justice and he has no authority to tell them what they should say or what they should not say.

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L LIB

April 15, 1920