February 10, 1927

?

Some hon. MEMBERS:

Explain.

Topic:   ST. REGIS INDIAN RESERVE CONTROL BY SUPERINTENDENT GENERAL
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LIB

Charles A. Stewart (Superintendent-General of Indian Affairs; Minister of Mines; Minister of the Interior)

Liberal

Mr. STEWART (Edmonton):

In the Indian act provision is made for doing just what this bill proposes to do, namely to lease lands, but there is not full provision for leasing lands that are already under lease. Inasmuch as these lands have been in some cases for ninety-nine years held under lease with a provision in the lease that there be a continuation of it for a further ninety-nine years-and indeed it is somewhat indefinite- action was taken in the Exchequer court by the Department of Indian Affairs to cancel these leases. It will be understood by the House that there are no Indians residing on these islands but they are very valuable as summer resorts. As regards the islands designated in the bill we have succeeded in cancelling the leases. There are two or three as to which a decision of the court is still

pending. We are asking for power not to sell these islands but to lease them and to get a reasonable revenue out of them for the maintenance of the Indians.

Motion agreed to and bill read the first time.

Topic:   ST. REGIS INDIAN RESERVE CONTROL BY SUPERINTENDENT GENERAL
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INDIAN ACT AMENDMENT


Hon. CHARLES STEWART (Minister of the Interior) moved for leave to introduce Bill No. 56. to amend the Indian Act.


?

Some hon. MEMBERS:

Explain.

Topic:   INDIAN ACT AMENDMENT
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LIB

Charles A. Stewart (Superintendent-General of Indian Affairs; Minister of Mines; Minister of the Interior)

Liberal

Mr. STEWART (Edmonton):

The first

purpose of the proposed amendments to the Indian Act are to give the Superintendent General of Indian Affairs power to deal with small amounts accruing to the bands in the way of band funds where in some cases the bands have become almost extinct, and to allocate these moneys in the interest of the Indians. The second provision is that we shall have more complete control over pool rooms and places of amusement upon the reserve, and the third is as fallows: Under the act as it exists at present all changes in the regulations, and particularly in connection with those dealing with the appointment of Indian chiefs, have to be enacted by order in council. We are asking that this may be accomplished by the Superintendent General without reference to the council. Paragraph 6 is repealed and there is a provision for the repression of intemperance and profligacy. This is to give the council of chiefs themselves more power and to make clearer the meaning of the definition giving them more power to take action.

There is the question of carrying out the temperance laws, which it has become somewhat difficult to enforce, and we are asking wider powers in that connection. In British Columbia we are asking for some control over the sale of totem poles, which are of great historical value and which have been disposed of and sold without let or hindrance, indeed without the Superintendent General or the department being able to exercise any control whatever. These are the main provisions oi the amendment to the act.

Motion agreed to and bill read the first time.

Topic:   INDIAN ACT AMENDMENT
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QUESTIONS


(Questions answered orally are indicated by an asterisk).


INSURANCE OF FRENCH-CANADIAN WOMEN

LIB

Mr. BOULANGER:

Liberal

1. Is the government aware that certain insurance companies demand an extra premium on policies issued in favour of Frencli-Canadian women ?

Questions

2. If so, does the government intend to introduce legislation to stop such unfair discrimination?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   INSURANCE OF FRENCH-CANADIAN WOMEN
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LIB

James Alexander Robb (Minister of Finance and Receiver General)

Liberal

Hon. Mr. ROBB:

The government is aware that higher rates have in some cases in the past been charged Freneh-Canadian women, the extra charge being, it was claimed, justified by the mortality experience of this class of insured risks. It is believed, however, that the practice has been abandoned and that little cause for complaint will be found in the future.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   INSURANCE OF FRENCH-CANADIAN WOMEN
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SOUTH INDIAN-CHANGE OF NAME TO LIMOGES

CON

Mr. GARLAND (Carleton):

Conservative (1867-1942)

1. Has any change been made by the Post Office department in the name of South Indian post office, in the county of Russell, Ontario?

2. If so, what is the present official name of this office, and is there any other office of the same name in Canada? If so, where?

3. Why was a change of name made in respect of this office?

4. At what date was the change authorized?

5. Was any petition presented by the local residents in favour of such change of name?

6. If so, how many petitioners signed such petition?

7. Was any petition presented against such change of name?

8. If so, how many petitioners signed such last-named petition?

9. How and by whom was the new name of this post office selected?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   SOUTH INDIAN-CHANGE OF NAME TO LIMOGES
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LIB

Hon. Mr. VENIOT: (Postmaster General)

Liberal

1. Yes.

2. Limoges. No other post office of same name.

3. Petitioners Stated South Indian has no meaning. There are no Indians in neighbourhood and name provokes ridicule.

4. Authorized 23rd October, 1926, effective 1st December.

5. Yes.

6. 59.

7. Yes.

8. 246.

9. Recommended by petitioners who stated it was name of former parish priest held in high esteem, whose anceiStors came from Limoges, France.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   SOUTH INDIAN-CHANGE OF NAME TO LIMOGES
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CHINESE SITUATION

CON

Mr. BLACK (Yukon):

Conservative (1867-1942)

1. What has Canada done to protect Canadians in China during the present disturbances in that country?

2. What protection is now being afforded such Canadians and at whose expense?

3. If Canada is contributing to the expense of such protection, how and to whom is the contribution made?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   CHINESE SITUATION
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LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Liberal

Right Hon. Mr. MACKENZIE KING:

This question relates to the situation in China and I will therefore read to the House the reply which I propose to make to it. The

reply will perhaps serve to answer other questions on the order paper and what it might otherwise be necessary to say in reference to one of the motions of which notice has been given.

The protection of life and property, in any country, whether of nationals or of aliens, is primarily the duty of the government of that country. Of latte, civil war in China, now of several years' duration, has increased the difficulty of ensuring that protection, and the evacuation of certain interior areas by foreign residents has been considered an advisable precaution. At the same time it must be recognized that the loss of life by foreigners in these yearn of disturbance has been extraordinarily small. So far >as is known, only one Canadian has been killed; the existence of a political motive in that case, which occurred in June, 1926, was not fully established, and 'the murderer was shot immediately by Chinese soldiers.

Canada is in full sympathy with the desire, of the Chinese people to secure control of their own destiny, having due regard to the safety of the life and property of foreign residents. While there are extremist elements in the situation, it is clear that as regards the responsible leaders and 'the great majority of the Chinese people, the present nationalist movement is directed, noit against the lives or private rights of foreign residents but against the special! privileges or the measure of control over Chinese affairs exercised by foreign countries as regards extra-territoriality, customs, concessions and other matters. Canada has not in the past had any part in shaping or maintaining the policy of acquiring such rights or privileges in China, and has had no part in the recent hegotiations for their readjustment. The Canadian government is, however, in full sympathy with the British Foreign Secretary's announced policy of "going as far as possible to meet the legitimate aspirations of the Chinese nation," and believes that this course is both just and best adapted to ensure protection of life and of religious and business interests.

Under these circumstances it is not considered that it would serve any useful purpose to propose despatching Canadian forces to China. If the situation should change the government will take the earliest opportunity of consulting with parliament as to the appropriate course to pursue.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   CHINESE SITUATION
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SIR AUGUSTUS M. NANTON

LAB

Mr. WOODSWORTH:

Labour

1. What sums of money, if any, were paid during tlie war to Sir Augustus M. Nanton?

2. For what services?

Montreal Harbour Commission

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   SIR AUGUSTUS M. NANTON
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LIB

James Alexander Robb (Minister of Finance and Receiver General)

Liberal

Hon. Mr. ROBB:

The late Sir Augustus

M. Nanton was a member of the general executive and the head of the organization for the province of Manitoba in the three victory loan campaigns, 1917, 1918, and 1919. The records of the Department of Finance indicate that he served in these capacities without remuneration.

If my hon. friend desires to inquire from any other department his question will have to stand as an order for a return.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   SIR AUGUSTUS M. NANTON
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February 10, 1927