February 24, 1927

LIB-PRO

Robert Forke (Minister of Immigration and Colonization)

Liberal Progressive

Mr. FORKE:

I have no information as

to that-. I do not see what difference it would really make.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   IMPORTATION OF SCOTH MINERS
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LAB

James Shaver Woodsworth

Labour

Mr. J. S. WOODSWORTH (Winnipeg North Centre):

Mr. Speaker, may I ask the hon.

minister another question? Whether any application was made by the British Empire Steel Corporation for permission to bring these men in?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   IMPORTATION OF SCOTH MINERS
Permalink
LIB-PRO

Robert Forke (Minister of Immigration and Colonization)

Liberal Progressive

Mr. FORKE:

Mr. Speaker, I am inclined

to believe that at some previous time a requisition was made by the British Empire Steel Corporation to get miners from Great Britain. I cannot definitely say how recently that requisition was made, but I can find out and let the hon. member know at another sitting of the House.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   IMPORTATION OF SCOTH MINERS
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LAB

TELEPHONE RATES CASE


On the Orders of the Day:


CON

Thomas Langton Church

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. T. L. CHURCH (Toronto Northwest):

I should like to ask the Minister of Justice a question based on an order or judgment of a majority of the Board of Railway Commissioners for Canada, effective March I, granting a substantial increase of rates to the Bell Telephone Company. An appeal is being taken on questions of both law and fact to the Supreme court and Governor General in Council. As the case is still sub judice will the Minister of Justice, as Attorney General of Canada, or the government under the Railway Act, grant a stay for thirty days of this order, or request the commissioners so to do before these new schedules of rates are sanctioned, especially as one of the board in a dissenting judgment holds that both the law and the facts were against the company's contention?

This would be a reasonable application of the doctrine of sub judice. Section 56 of the Railway Act defines the powers of the Governor General in Council as follows:

The governor in council may at any time, in his discretion, either upon petition of any party, person or company interested, or of his own motion, and without any petition or application. vary or rescind any order, decision, rule or regulation of the boards, whether such order or decision is made inter partes or otherwise, and whether such regulation is general or limited

in its scope and application; and any order which the governor in council may make with respect thereto shall be binding upon the board and upon all parties.

I would suggest that the minister might answer this to-morrow.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   TELEPHONE RATES CASE
Sub-subtopic:   JUDGMENT OF DOMINION RAILWAY COMMISSION
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LIB

Hewitt Bostock (Speaker of the Senate)

Liberal

Mr. SPEAKER:

Order. The hon. gentleman has put his question.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   TELEPHONE RATES CASE
Sub-subtopic:   JUDGMENT OF DOMINION RAILWAY COMMISSION
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LIB

Ernest Lapointe (Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada)

Liberal

Hon. ERNEST LAPOINTE (Minister of Justice):

Mr. Speaker, I may say meanwhile that we have not received any information in the matter except what has been published in the newspapers. If an appeal is taken and an application is made as suggested by my hon. friend, it will be considered and dealt with on its merits.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   TELEPHONE RATES CASE
Sub-subtopic:   JUDGMENT OF DOMINION RAILWAY COMMISSION
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CUSTOMS COMMISSION-ITINERARY


On the Orders of the Day:


CON

William Gordon Ernst

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. W. G. ERNST (Queens-Lunenburg):

Mr. Speaker, I should like to ask the Minister of Customs if it is the intention of the government to have the customs commission sit again in the Maritime provinces? I put the question because at the time the commission was there last year the chairman intimated that its work could not be completed owing to the imminence of the general election, and I have since seen it stated in the press that the commission did not intend to again visit either Nova Scotia or New Brunswick.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   CUSTOMS COMMISSION-ITINERARY
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LIB

William Daum Euler (Minister of Customs and Excise)

Liberal

Hon. W. D. EULER (Minister of Customs and Excise):

Mr. Speaker, I might say that

the commission of inquiry is not in any way under the control of my department. I will direct my hon. friend's question to the proper quarter.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   CUSTOMS COMMISSION-ITINERARY
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CON

William Gordon Ernst

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. ERNST:

May I ask the hon. minister under whose control the commission is?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   CUSTOMS COMMISSION-ITINERARY
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LIB

William Daum Euler (Minister of Customs and Excise)

Liberal

Mr. EULER:

It is not controlled. It has authority to go wherever it pleases. For the information of the House I may say that I understand it is the intention of the commission to proceed again to the Maritime provinces, but I am not saying that with any authority. My hon. friend's inquiry should, I think, be directed to the commission itself.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   CUSTOMS COMMISSION-ITINERARY
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THE BUDGET


The House resumed from Wednesday, February 23, the debate on the motion of Hon. J. A. Robb (Minister of Finance) that Mr. Speaker, do now leave the chair for the House to go into committee of ways and means, and the proposed amendment thereto of Mr. Coote.599 The Budget-Mr. Hocken


CON

Horatio Clarence Hocken

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. H. C. HOCKEN (Toronto West Centre):

Mr. Speaker, having regard to the pledges of the government and to the large support that the government gets from the free trade element in this House, I presume that we on this side who believe in reasonable protection for the industries of the country ought to feel more or less satisfied that this particular budget does not further reduce tariff duties. It will be a disappointment to my hon. friend from Rosetown (Mr. Evans), who predicted last session that -there would probably be a reduction in the duty on boots and shoes. But boots and shoes is a very tender spot in the tariff with many hon. gentlemen opposite. The rosy picture which the Minister of Finance (Mr. Robb) paints of present conditions in Canada are not at all in accordance with the facts. I am prepared to admit that there is some slight improvement in trade, but it is more a hopeful spirit than any actual advance in conditions of trade and industry throughout the country. I judge, from what we have read from the general managers of our banks, that a concerted effort is being made by them, which perhaps is very laudable, to cultivate a spirit of optimism in the country, and in that desire they have gone much further than the facts would warrant. I do not think any person who has a knowledge of the industrial situation to-day can claim that this country enjoys that abounding prosperity referred to by the minister. The only class that is fully employed in Canada to-day is the farming community; and of course the farmer has always a job. But if you get into general industry you find a great many factories working half time, a great many closed down, and a general state of anxiety on the part of those who have the management of these enterprises under their charge.

I am not surprised to learn that the unemployment index is better now than it was last year. 'This is due, not to a larger number in employment, but to the fact that there are fewer people to be employed. When our people are leaving the country at the rate of 100.000 a year, there are inevitably fewer unemployed left at home. And that is exactly the situation so far as general industry is concerned. There may be an industry here or there enjoying special favours, like the implement industry which is doing very well, but if you take the whole range of industrial activities throughout the country you will find that the conditions are not at all such as are described by the Minister of Finance.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   THE BUDGET
Sub-subtopic:   CONTINUATION OF DEBATE ON THE ANNUAL FINANCIAL STATEMENT OF THE MINISTER OF FINANCE.
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LIB

Thomas McMillan

Liberal

Mr. McMILLAN:

What special favours

does the implement industry enjoy?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   THE BUDGET
Sub-subtopic:   CONTINUATION OF DEBATE ON THE ANNUAL FINANCIAL STATEMENT OF THE MINISTER OF FINANCE.
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CON

Horatio Clarence Hocken

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. HOCKEN:

Free materials and freedom from the sales tax. If we had in this country to-day all the Canadians who have gone to the United States, unemployment would be as great here to-day as it has been in the past few years, or greater.

I fancy my hon. friend from Macleod (Mr. Coote) will not expect the members of this party to have any particular sympathy with his amendment. Speaking for myself, at any rate, I must say I have no sympathy for it. It comprises two things: first, a demand for lower duties, and secondly, a protest against the reduction in the income tax. Now, we are not going to get any lower duties this year, and I think the explanation given by the government, as indicated by my hon. friend from South Huron (Mr. McMillan) yesterday, is quite reasonable. He points out that the ministers have been so busy that they have been unable to prepare a budget providing for lower duties. That is a fair explanation; it is one that any free trader on the other side of the House may find it easy to accept. There appear, however, to be one or two over there who do not accept it. although the hon. member for South Huron, at least, does. And, as I say, it appeals to me as a reasonable explanation. The protest against the reduction in the income tax, embodied in the amendment, comes properly from a section of the country that does not pay any income tax worth speaking about. Take the province of Saskatchewan for example : the total payments of income tax there work out at an insignificant fraction over one dollar per head of the population. If you take Ontario, on the other hand, you will find the per capita income tax given at $8.66. So that hon. members from the prairies who pay no income tax-

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   THE BUDGET
Sub-subtopic:   CONTINUATION OF DEBATE ON THE ANNUAL FINANCIAL STATEMENT OF THE MINISTER OF FINANCE.
Permalink

February 24, 1927