March 7, 1930

LIB

Charles Avery Dunning (Minister of Finance and Receiver General)

Liberal

Mr. DUNNING:

There is no New Zealand treaty.

Topic:   SUPPLY-AUSTRALIAN TREATY
Permalink
CON

Leon Johnson Ladner

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. LADNER:

The order in council, I

should say; this makes effective the provisions of the Australian treaty with respect to New Zealand. When the matter originally came before parliament in 1924, in the form in which it was put, raising the general tariff, and in that way giving preference to Australia and New Zealand, it was quite apparent that no injury could be done to the industries of this country and that trade relationships between these countries would be improved. What we object to, and what I pointed out at the time, is that by reducing the tariff and putting it on a low tariff and free trade basis the government was bound to injure a number of industries in this country. That is exactly what has occurred. To-day the best evidence of it is in the capitulation of the government to the viewpoint which this side has advocated on this very motion.

Topic:   SUPPLY-AUSTRALIAN TREATY
Permalink
IND

Alan Webster Neill

Independent

Mr. NEILL:

Did the hon. gentleman not

vote for the treaty as it was passed, and which contained section five extending the provisions to New Zealand?

Topic:   SUPPLY-AUSTRALIAN TREATY
Permalink
CON
LIB

Peter John Veniot (Postmaster General)

Liberal

Mr. VENIOT:

And claimed credit for

forcing the government to pass it?

Australian Treaty-Mr. Ladner

3S9

Topic:   SUPPLY-AUSTRALIAN TREATY
Permalink
CON

Leon Johnson Ladner

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. LADNER:

I certainly supported it

because, as regards British Columbia, when the good and the bad of the treaty are taken together, we have an advantage with our exports of canned salmon, paper and pulp, fish and articles of that kind-

Topic:   SUPPLY-AUSTRALIAN TREATY
Permalink
LIB
CON

Leon Johnson Ladner

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. LADNER:

If the minister had been on the job, he would have known that we have lumber-

Topic:   SUPPLY-AUSTRALIAN TREATY
Permalink
LIB

James Malcolm (Minister of Trade and Commerce)

Liberal

Mr. MALCOLM:

Our lumber exports to Australia have doubled this year.

Topic:   SUPPLY-AUSTRALIAN TREATY
Permalink
CON

Leon Johnson Ladner

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. LADNER:

The minister's figures are correct except for the fact that he has got them reversed. I read from his own official report under the heading of "Wood, unmanufactured (including lumber)" that our exports to Australia in 1928 amounted to $1,405,712, and in 1929 to $826,856.

Topic:   SUPPLY-AUSTRALIAN TREATY
Permalink
LIB
CON
LIB

James Malcolm (Minister of Trade and Commerce)

Liberal

Mr. MALCOLM:

My hon. friend must be reading the wrong statement.

Topic:   SUPPLY-AUSTRALIAN TREATY
Permalink
CON

Leon Johnson Ladner

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. LADNER:

I am quoting from an official report of the Department of Trade and Commerce, published under the authority of the Hon. James Malcolm, Minister of Trade and Commerce.

Topic:   SUPPLY-AUSTRALIAN TREATY
Permalink
LIB

James Malcolm (Minister of Trade and Commerce)

Liberal

Mr. MALCOLM:

Then my hon. friend cannot be right in his interpretation of the figures.

Topic:   SUPPLY-AUSTRALIAN TREATY
Permalink
CON

Leon Johnson Ladner

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. LADNER:

I am not going to have a minister of the crown tell me, when I read from his own document, that the figures are not correct.

Topic:   SUPPLY-AUSTRALIAN TREATY
Permalink
LIB
CON

Leon Johnson Ladner

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. LADNER:

From page 124. It says under the heading of "Wood, unmanufactured (including lumber)" that we exported in 1928, $1,405,712, and in 1929, $826,856. Now that includes lumber. That is what we in British Columbia want. We hope that the government will succeed. We are with you in that matter and will give you all the help we can.

So far as British Columbia is concerned, Mr. Speaker, we are strongly in favour of improved trade relations with New Zealand and any other country, particularly our sister dominions. We believe that increased trade is a good thing. We have things that we can send to New Zealand; they have goods that they can send to us. I for my part have always contended, as I think the members from British Columbia and the members of this party have contended, that it is possible to enter into trade arrangements with other countries without smashing the industries that are indigenous to Canada. That can be done, and the criticism that we have to make of the government is that they yielded to a theory and fantasy of free trade ideas and embodied them into a practical trade agreement to the quite unnecessary injury of the dairy interests of this country. That is the mistake which they made. They now see the error of their ways, and they are willing to amend the treaty. They come down to the house, and in their anxiety to adjust the treaty, they move an amendment to the motion that we have submitted. We say that it is a good thing that they do this. Coming from British Columbia, I would urge the government, in negotiating another treaty, which the government have announced as their policy, that they take into consideration the lumber and saw mill interests of British Columbia, and endeavour to make an agreement that will enable us to send our goods down there to greater advantage than we can at the present time.

Topic:   SUPPLY-AUSTRALIAN TREATY
Permalink
LIB-PRO

John Livingstone Brown

Liberal Progressive

Mr. BROWN:

What does the hon. member propose to accept from New Zealand?

Topic:   SUPPLY-AUSTRALIAN TREATY
Permalink
CON

Leon Johnson Ladner

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. LADNER:

Whatever they can send us provided it is not going to destroy an industry that is indigenous to this country. We believe in protecting the agricultural and manufacturing industries of this country, to provide work for our own people and develop business in Canada. The hon. gentlemen on the other side do not believe in that, and that is the difference between us.

Topic:   SUPPLY-AUSTRALIAN TREATY
Permalink

March 7, 1930