May 19, 1930

PRO

William Russell Fansher

Progressive

Mr. FANSHER (Last Mountain):

This is a matter of government policy.

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS
Subtopic:   CUSTOMS TARIFF AMENDMENT
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LIB

Charles Avery Dunning (Minister of Finance and Receiver General)

Liberal

Mr. DUNNING:

Yes.

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS
Subtopic:   CUSTOMS TARIFF AMENDMENT
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PRO

William Russell Fansher

Progressive

Mr. FANSHER (Last Mountain):

What is that policy? Retaliation or what?

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS
Subtopic:   CUSTOMS TARIFF AMENDMENT
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LIB

Charles Avery Dunning (Minister of Finance and Receiver General)

Liberal

Mr. DUNNING:

The policy with respect to wheat is to say more effectively what section 11 of the customs tariff has said for a number of years. For a number of years section 11 has made what is virtually a standing offer with regard to certain commodities.

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS
Subtopic:   CUSTOMS TARIFF AMENDMENT
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CON

William Gordon Ernst

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. ERNST:

Will the minister -read the

section?

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS
Subtopic:   CUSTOMS TARIFF AMENDMENT
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LIB

Charles Avery Dunning (Minister of Finance and Receiver General)

Liberal

Mr. DUNNING:

I am not sure if it is

with respect to wheat.

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS
Subtopic:   CUSTOMS TARIFF AMENDMENT
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CON

William Gordon Ernst

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. ERNST:

I do not think it is; I think it is a general gesture of good will.

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS
Subtopic:   CUSTOMS TARIFF AMENDMENT
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LIB

Charles Avery Dunning (Minister of Finance and Receiver General)

Liberal

Mr. DUNNING:

Section 11 reads:

If the President of the United States, under authority of the United States Tariff Act of 1922, determines to reduce the duties imposed by such act on the following articles, that is to say:-cattle; wheat; wheat flour; oats; barley; potatoes; onions; turnips; hay; fish as enumerated in paragraphs-

And then it gives the paragraphs.

-the governor in council may by order in council make such reductions of duties on such articles imported into Canada from the United States as may be deemed reasonable by way of compensation for such reductions on Canadian products imported into the United States.

That provision, which existed in our law since 1923, remains, but in addition we say

in the tariff that while our rate of duty on wheat with respect to the United States remains at twelve cents, there shall be a countervailing provision upward and we have in addition the provision to enable us to meet them in any reductions.

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS
Subtopic:   CUSTOMS TARIFF AMENDMENT
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CON

Hugh Alexander Stewart

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. STEWART (Leeds):

Have we not

heard it in the house time and again that it is impossible to protect the western wheat grower?

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS
Subtopic:   CUSTOMS TARIFF AMENDMENT
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LIB

Charles Avery Dunning (Minister of Finance and Receiver General)

Liberal

Mr. DUNNING:

It is.

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS
Subtopic:   CUSTOMS TARIFF AMENDMENT
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CON

Hugh Alexander Stewart

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. STEWART (Leeds):

Then why this

duty? Is this not a contradiction of the doctrine we have heard enunciated for years?

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS
Subtopic:   CUSTOMS TARIFF AMENDMENT
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LIB

Charles Avery Dunning (Minister of Finance and Receiver General)

Liberal

Mr. DUNNING:

No.

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS
Subtopic:   CUSTOMS TARIFF AMENDMENT
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CON

Hugh Alexander Stewart

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. STEWART (Leeds):

What is it? Is it retaliation? Is it a countervailing duty? It seems to me to be absurd to give people protection when they do not want it. When they have said in the house that they do not need it; that it is impossible to help them, why insert this provision in the tariff?

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS
Subtopic:   CUSTOMS TARIFF AMENDMENT
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Item agreed to. Customs tariff-61. Wheat flour and semolina, per barrel: British preferential tariff, free; intermediate tariff, 56 cents; general tariff, 50 cents. Provided that, if any country imposes upon wheat flour or semolina produced in, and imported from, Canada rates of duty higher than are enumerated in this item, equivalent rates of duty shall be imposed upon wheat flour or semolina entering Canada from such country.


CON

Robert James Manion

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. MANION:

Will the minister give the imports under this item?

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS
Subtopic:   CUSTOMS TARIFF AMENDMENT
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LIB

Charles Avery Dunning (Minister of Finance and Receiver General)

Liberal

Mr. DUNNING:

In 1929 Canada imported wheat flour valued at $540,000, of which $539,000 worth came from the tfnited States.

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS
Subtopic:   CUSTOMS TARIFF AMENDMENT
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CON

Leon Johnson Ladner

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. LADNER:

How much from the United Kingdom-$14?

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS
Subtopic:   CUSTOMS TARIFF AMENDMENT
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LIB

Charles Avery Dunning (Minister of Finance and Receiver General)

Liberal

Mr. DUNNING:

Practically nothing. This is not an article we are likely to get from Great Britain. It is really absurd to have a tariff on it from Great Britain.

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS
Subtopic:   CUSTOMS TARIFF AMENDMENT
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CON

Robert James Manion

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. MANION:

I notice that the duty on wheat flour under this item is fifty cents a barrel, but the duty going into the United States is at the present time $2.04 a barrel.

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS
Subtopic:   CUSTOMS TARIFF AMENDMENT
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LIB

Charles Avery Dunning (Minister of Finance and Receiver General)

Liberal

Mr. DUNNING:

No. The present rate per 100 pounds going into the United States is seventy-eight cents, and their proposed rate is $1.04.

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS
Subtopic:   CUSTOMS TARIFF AMENDMENT
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May 19, 1930