May 23, 1930


On the orders of the day:


CON

Richard Bedford Bennett (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Hon. R. B. BENNETT (Leader of the Opposition) :

Mr. Speaker, might I inquire of

the Prime Minister when the correspondence in connection with the proposed New Zealand treaty will be brought down? My hon. friend the Minister of Justice (Mr. Lapointe) was . to speak to the right hon. gentleman about it, but I fancy that in the multiplicity of his duties this might -have been overlooked.

Topic:   NEW ZEALAND TREATY
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LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Liberal

Right Hon. W. L. MACKENZIE KING (Prime Minister):

The correspondence is in

. the nature of negotiations between two governments and is confidential. Up to the present time the negotiations are incomplete, and beyond the statement as to what is set forth in our correspondence, I do not think there is anything we would be justified in bringing down. As a matter of fact I happen to recall that a communication from the New Zealand government mentions the desirability of not making the correspondence fully public at the present time.

Topic:   NEW ZEALAND TREATY
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CON

Richard Bedford Bennett (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. BENNETT:

The right hon. gentleman will recall that in the Senate the leader of the government sa.w fit to -put upon Hansard letters that had passed between the American representatives and our representatives in connection with the treaty regarding smuggling, even though one of the letters was dated only two days before. This house is still without that correspondence. I thought we should at

Civil Service

least have before us in connection with the New Zealand treaty the notice that was referred to in the speech of the hon. Minister of Finance (Mr. Dunning) as to the rescission of the order in council being made operative as of October 12.

Topic:   NEW ZEALAND TREATY
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LIB

Charles Avery Dunning (Minister of Finance and Receiver General)

Liberal

Mr. DUNNING:

Notice was given to that effect.

Topic:   NEW ZEALAND TREATY
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CON

Richard Bedford Bennett (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. BENNETT:

I quite appreciate the

right hon. gentleman's statement as to the confidential nature of correspondence of that delicate character. But on the other hand the notice referred to by the Minister of Finance should be laid on the table.

Topic:   NEW ZEALAND TREATY
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LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Liberal

Mr. MACKENZIE KING:

The fact of

the notice having been given is public now. That notice is contained in the correspondence, a part of which I am afraid is confidential. I doubt if it is possible at this time to supplement the actual statement that such notice has been given.

Topic:   NEW ZEALAND TREATY
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CIVIL SERVICE

SUPPLEMENTARY REFERENCE OF SALARY QUESTION TO BEATTY COMMISSION


On the orders of the day:


CON

Leon Johnson Ladner

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. L. J. LADNER (Vancouver South):

Mr. Speaker, I wish to ask the Prime Minister a question with respect to order in council P.C. 1053, which extends the scope of inquiry of the Beatty commission. Under the order in council will opportunity be given to the civil service organizations, particularly the professional institute of civil servants, to make representations before the Beatty commission in order to correct anomalies as to' classification and salaries and the alleged omissions in the present Beatty report? That is will the functions of the existing committee still continue? If the Prime Minister will look at the order in council he will find the following:

The committee, therefore, on the recommendation of the Secretary of State, advise that a supplementary commission be issued to the said commissioners extending the scope of the inquiry to include such investigation, and also the advisability of fixing a minimum salary for employees in the civil service.

Topic:   CIVIL SERVICE
Subtopic:   SUPPLEMENTARY REFERENCE OF SALARY QUESTION TO BEATTY COMMISSION
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LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Liberal

Right Hon. W. L. MACKENZIE KING (Prime Minister):

I think it is most desirable that the commission should hear representations from any of the organizations with respect to any anomalies or any other features which they think should be inquired into by the commission.

Topic:   CIVIL SERVICE
Subtopic:   SUPPLEMENTARY REFERENCE OF SALARY QUESTION TO BEATTY COMMISSION
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POSTAL TERMINAL "A" TORONTO


On the orders of the day:


CON

Thomas Langton Church

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. T. L. CHURCH (Toronto Northwest):

May I bring to the notice of the Postmaster General (Mr. Veniot) the fact that postal terminal "A", which is the largest postal station in Toronto closes its doors at 7 o'clock every day, except Saturday, when the closing time is at noon. Surely this is not right. I wish to bring to the attention of the Postmaster General also the question of keeping all post offices, especially the larger ones, open till midnight during the Shriners' convention. Postal terminal "A" should be kept open till 10 o'clock. It is beside the mail trains and people coming down with mail find the place closed and cannot get stamps.

The post office is a public utility and the public interest should be paramount. Toronto returns a great profit. Why not give an up-to-date service? The postal revenues of Toronto are about 86,000,000, which shows the need of a large central post office near the depot with proper accommodation for the public using this most important utility.

Topic:   POSTAL TERMINAL "A" TORONTO
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LIB

Peter John Veniot (Postmaster General)

Liberal

Hon. P. J. VENIOT (Postmaster General):

Mr. Speaker, the hon. member was kind enough to send me the notice of this question, and during the noon hour I made certain inquiries at the department. Before I read the statement which they prepared for me, may I say that when any large conventions are being organized it would be only right that the department should facilitate as much as possible the work of those conventions in the matter of communication by mail, and on such occasions special arrangements will be made to meet their convenience. Let me read the memorandum prepared by the department:

The department has for some time been giving consideration to the arrangements for postal facilities during the Shriners' convention in June. Special offices are being opened in the government building at the exhibition grounds and in proximity to the two points where accommodation is being provided by the railway companies.

Adequate facilities for conducting postal business will also be in operation in the Royal York hotel, where the headquarters of the convention will be located. This office, which is immediately across Front street from terminal "A," will be open at all hours of the day.

The situation is being closely watched and is being given special study by a competent postal official of the Toronto office. In the event of there being any indication that the arrangements already made will prove inadequate, the department is prepared to take whatever additional steps are necessary to ensure a first-class service.

Russian Anthracite Coal

As regards the hour of closing of postal terminal "A," it may he stated that experience has shown that there is no demand for service at that point after 7 o'clock in the evening. The Adelaide street office, which is more conveniently situated, is open until 10 o'clock every night.

It should be pointed out, however, that while the lobby of terminal ''A" is closed at 7 o'clock, the public can obtain access for the purpose of posting mail matter and purchasing stamps by entering the office on the lower level immediately under the main entrance to the lobby.

As regards the hours of closing of the other postal stations in Toronto, these have been fixed as the result of experience obtained by the officials at Toronto and it is not considered that there is sufficient public demand for later closing to justify the department in going to the extra expense which would be involved if employees had to be retained on duty to serve the wickets.

I may add that the whole situation is now being reviewed again, and if thought necessary the hours will be changed.

FILIPINO IMMIGRATION On the orders of the day:

Topic:   POSTAL TERMINAL "A" TORONTO
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CON

William Garland McQuarrie

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. W. G. McQUARRIE (New Westminster) :

Mr. Speaker, may I ask the acting Minister of Immigration (Mr. Stewart) if he has had any advices as to the influx of Filipinos into British Columbia. According to my information, these Filipinos first invaded the states of California and Oregon. They gave a good deal of trouble in the Sacramento valley. Then quite a number of them moved up to the state of Washington, and as a result there have been some race riots. I believe two hundred or so were driven off the farms between Seattle and Tacoma. Now they are drifting into the province of British Columbia and are entering the labour market. If we do not wish to have another race problem in British Columbia something should be done right away to meet the situation.

Topic:   POSTAL TERMINAL "A" TORONTO
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LIB

Charles A. Stewart (Minister of Immigration and Colonization; Superintendent-General of Indian Affairs; Minister of Mines; Minister of the Interior)

Liberal

Hon. CHARLES STEWART (Minister of the Interior):

The matter has not been

brought to my attention, but I shall make inquiries.

Topic:   POSTAL TERMINAL "A" TORONTO
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FONTAINE AND LACASSE


On the orders of the day:


May 23, 1930