July 15, 1931

CON

Pierre Édouard Blondin (Speaker of the Senate)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. SPEAKER:

If the hon. member desires to appeal from my ruling, he may do so; otherwise no discussion is allowed.

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LIB
?

Some hon. MEMBERS:

Order.

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LIB
CON

Robert James Manion (Minister of Railways and Canals)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. MANION:

It is the authority of the Speaker.

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LIB
LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Liberal

Mr. MACKENZIE KING (Leader of the Opposition):

Mr. Speaker, I take it that it is Your Honour who has decided that these questions are not to appear on the order paper, and not the clerk.

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CON

Pierre Édouard Blondin (Speaker of the Senate)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. SPEAKER:

It is the duty of the clerk to look over these questions and decide whether or not, within his knowledge, they are parliamentary and properly admissible. He decided they were not and he submitted his reasons to me as well as to the hon. member for Temiscouata (Mr. Pouliot). As I said before, I rule the questions and the notices of motion out of order.

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LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Liberal

Mr. MACKENZIE KING:

Mr. Speaker, I desire merely to clear up a matter of procedure. I have looked into the practice which prevails in the British House of Commons and I understand that the rule at Westminster is that His Honour, the Speaker is the one who decides whether or not a question shall appear on the order paper, just as he decides whether or not a particular question should or should not be asked in the house. I submit that Your Honour is entitled to be advised from any source, you may desire, but I think the full responsibility for any decision should be that of His Honour the Speaker and not that of the Clerk of the House.

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CON

Richard Bedford Bennett (Prime Minister; Minister of Finance and Receiver General; President of the Privy Council; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Right Hon. R. B. BENNETT (Prime Minister):

Mr. Speaker, I would be fully in accord with what my right hon. friend has said if he had stated that the ultimate responsibility would rest upon the Speaker.

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LIB
CON

Richard Bedford Bennett (Prime Minister; Minister of Finance and Receiver General; President of the Privy Council; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. BENNETT:

It frequently happens that the clerk at the table, both at Westminster and here, deals with questions and orders as they are referred to him, but the ultimate responsibility must be upon the Speaker.

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LIB
CON

Pierre Édouard Blondin (Speaker of the Senate)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. SPEAKER:

From what I said, I did not think there would be any doubt that the Speaker was taking full responsibility in the matter.

Second Narrows Bridge

PRIVILEGE-Mr. DUPUIS

On the orders of the day:

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LIB

Vincent Dupuis

Liberal

Mr. VINCENT DUPUIS (Laprairie-Napier-ville (Translation):

Mr. Speaker, I rise to a

question of privilege. The " Bulletin des Agriculteurs" a weekly newspaper of Montreal, published, on July 9, 1931, an editorial dealing with my attitude towards the bill introduced by the hon. member for Compton (Mr. Gobeil), amending the act in connection with the penalty provided for adulterating butter.

I would have discussed this question last evening, when the bill came up; but seeing that the hon. member for Compton was not in his seat then, I find it necessary now to explain my stand by raising a question of privilege. It is stated, among other things, in this editorial that I am in favour of adulterating butter-

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CON
LIB

Vincent Dupuis

Liberal

Mr. DUPUIS (Translation):

It is the hon. member for Quebec-Montmorency, who says "that is so"! I had a higher appreciation of his judgment.

The editorial adds: "Mr. Dupuis, if you

wish to foster adulteration, say so openly."

With your kind indulgence, sir, I shall refer to the remarks I made on June 30 last, when the bill was before the house. I then stated that I was in favour of the bill; that I congratulated the hon. member for Compton for having brought up this question; that as a lawyer, I was aware, through experience, that dealers in cities adulterated butter by mixing cocoa oil, and that to inflict a heavy fine would be only right. However, on the other hand, seeing that this bill imposes the same penalty on all those who violate the act, and that in sections 5 and 7 especially, it is provided that all those who are convicted of having more than 16 per cent of water in their butter must be punished, I stated that the minimum penalty of $500 mentioned in the bill introduced by the hon. member for Compton should not be pressed, in order to leave some discretion to the judge who could determine whether the farmers have-

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CON

Pierre Édouard Blondin (Speaker of the Senate)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. SPEAKER:

I would remind the hon. member that there is no motion before the house.

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LIB
CON

Robert James Manion (Minister of Railways and Canals)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. MANION:

The hon. member is making a speech.

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July 15, 1931