November 8, 1932


On the orders of the day:


CON

Wesley Ashton Gordon (Minister of Immigration and Colonization; Minister of Labour; Minister of Mines)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Hon. W. A. GORDON (Minister of Labour):

On October 27 last, Mr. Speaker, the hon. member for Willow Bunch (Mr. Donnelly) asked a question which appears at page 601 of Hansard. The question was as follows:

Mr. Speaker, I should like to ask the Prime Minister or the Minister of Labour if the legislature of the province of Saskatchewan have approached the Dominion government asking for assistance in caring for the destitute farmers in the dried-out areas of Saskatchewan. If so, what arrangement has been arrived at?

I made inquiries from the officers of the Department of Labour and found that no request such as that suggested was made either by the provincial government or by any member thereof. I made further inquiries in the Department of Agriculture, and found that there was said to have been some discussion between the premier of Saskatchewan, I think, and the officers of that department with regard to the probable attitude of this government in case the farmers in those parts of Saskatchewan again suffered a complete crop failure. Nothing, however, has come formally before the Department of Labour.

Topic:   FARM RELIEF-SASKATCHEWAN
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PORTSMOUTH PENITENTIARY- WARDEN


On the orders of the day:


LIB

Thomas Reid

Liberal

Mr. THOMAS REID (New Westminster):

I should like to direct a question to the Minister of Justice (Mr. Guthrie). I understand that applications are being received for the position of superintendent or head warden of Portsmouth penitentiary, and that advertisements to this effect are appearing in Ontario papers only. I should like to ask the minister if this is the policy of his department, and whether he would not consider it advisable to call for applications throughout Canada, thus giving men in all parts of the dominion an opportunity to apply for this high position.

Imperial Conjerence-Trade Agreements

Topic:   PORTSMOUTH PENITENTIARY- WARDEN
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CON

Hugh Guthrie (Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Hon. HUGH GUTHRIE (Minister of Justice):

The advertisements in question, calling for applications for the position of warden at Portsmouth penitentiary have appeared, as my hon. friend has stated, with a residential qualification limited to the province of Ontario. It is true that the Penitentiaries Act provides for the appointment of wardens of penitentiaries generally and that when appointed a warden may be placed in charge of any penitentiary as occasion may require, but there is another provision in the Civil Service Act in regard to the locality from which appointments shall be made, and regard must be had under that act to applicants residing in the vicinity of the institution. I am informed that ever since the Civil Service Act came into operation advertisements have taken this form and have been limited to the province or area in which the penitentiary is located. When such an appointment is made the man is appointed as a warden generally for the whole dominion, though in the first instance the applications are limited in respect of residence to the particular penitentiary district.

Topic:   PORTSMOUTH PENITENTIARY- WARDEN
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LIB

Ernest Lapointe

Liberal

Mr. LAPOINTE:

Wardens have been transferred from one penitentiary to another.

Topic:   PORTSMOUTH PENITENTIARY- WARDEN
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CON

Hugh Guthrie (Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. GUTHRIE:

Yes, that is the object of the general clause in the act which provides that a man is appointed as a warden generally and can be transferred to any penitentiary as occasion may require.

Topic:   PORTSMOUTH PENITENTIARY- WARDEN
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BRITISH ORDER FOR POULTRY


On the orders of the day:


CON

Thomas Hay

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. THOMAS HAY (Springfield):

I should like to direct a question to the Minister of Trade and Commerce based on an article appearing in the Ottawa Journal this morning. The article is short and I should like to read it to the house. It is headed "Canadian Press by direct wire," and reads as follows:

Regina, November 7.

The United Kingdom government has given the Canadian government an order for one million pounds of poultry to be purchased in the west, according to reliable information received here today. Manitoba is expected to supply the bulk of the shipment since the birds will be shipped from the nearest shipping points. The better part of the order will be made up of turkeys and agents are said already to be in Manitoba cheeking over flocks. It is hoped the order may stabilize the trade in western Canada where it was feared turkeys would be retailing for 12 cents a pound by the Christinas season.

I should like to ask the minister if there is any truth in this despatch.

Topic:   BRITISH ORDER FOR POULTRY
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CON

Henry Herbert Stevens (Minister of Trade and Commerce)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Hon. H. H. STEVENS (Minister of Trade and Commerce):

With regard to the details

of the despatch, I am not familiar with precisely what has happened. I do know that a month or two ago the officers of my department in charge of external trade matters took up with the trade commissioners representing this dominion in the mother country the desirability of pressing Canadian poultry on the British market. We had very encouraging reports, and I presume that the story just read by my hon. friend is in large measure the result of these efforts. Although the matter came to my attention this morning I cannot give any detailed information with regard to this story, though I have every reason to believe that it is substantially correct.

Topic:   BRITISH ORDER FOR POULTRY
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GOVERNMENT WHEAT PURCHASES


On the orders of the day:


LIB

Pierre-François Casgrain (Whip of the Liberal Party)

Liberal

Mr. P. F. CASGRAIN (Charlevoix-Sague-nay):

I should like to direct the following

question to the government: Has the government, directly or indirectly, purchased grain in Winnipeg or in any other market? If so, what was the cost of the grain purchased and under what statutory authority were such purchases made?

Topic:   GOVERNMENT WHEAT PURCHASES
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CON

Richard Bedford Bennett (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Right Hon. R. B. BENNETT (Prime Minister) :

I think we might treat this question as a notice of motion.

Topic:   GOVERNMENT WHEAT PURCHASES
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TRADE AGREEMENT BETWEEN CANADA AND THE UNION OF SOUTH AFRICA


The house resumed from Monday, November 7, consideration in committee of Bill No. 3, respecting a certain trade agreement between the Dominion of Canada and the Union of South Africa-Mr. Bennett*-Mr. LaVergne in the chair. On section 2-Trade agreement approved.


LIB

Edward James Young

Liberal

Air. YOUNG:

When this section was under consideration last night I expressed the opinion that subsection 2 of article 1 would have the effect, in certain cases, of raising the duty on goods coming from South Africa by 10 per cent, and of forcing those duties into the general tariff, in other cases, making them much higher than they are at present. The Minister of Trade and Commerce took the view that I was entirely wrong. He said that there was no danger of that; the provisions of the preferential tariff would apply. I see, however, according to Hansard, that the Prime Minister does not seem to have taken that view. When I expressed the opinion I have just stated, he asked, "Who suffers from it?" May

934 COMMONS

Imperial Conference-Trade Agreements

I ask which opinion is correct, the opinion of the Minister of Trade and Commerce or the Prime Minister's. The section of the article referred to is this:

To enjoy the benefit of the tariff advantages provided for in section 1 of this article, goods originating in and coming from the Union of South Africa shall be imported direct into Canada.

Topic:   TRADE AGREEMENT BETWEEN CANADA AND THE UNION OF SOUTH AFRICA
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CON

Richard Bedford Bennett (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. BENNETT:

I do not think there

is any difference of opinion as between the Minister of Trade and Commerce and myself. I asked the question who suffers, and that has nothing to do with the fact that direct shipment is defined by the Customs Act itself. The Minister of Trade and Commerce referred to the section that defines what constitutes direct shipment. I was not in any sense discussing that. The Minister of Trade and Commerce said that it wras clearly understood beyond peradventure that the transshipment of goods under the circumstances he mentioned constituted direct shipment, and there is no question about it. There is no difference of opinion between us in that regard.

Topic:   TRADE AGREEMENT BETWEEN CANADA AND THE UNION OF SOUTH AFRICA
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November 8, 1932