March 17, 1933

CON

Robert James Manion (Minister of Railways and Canals)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. MANION:

I do not know what information the hon. gentleman wants.

Topic:   DEPARTMENT OP RAILWAYS
Permalink
LIB

Edward James Young

Liberal

Mr. YOUNG:

We would like to know how this deficit is made up. Some time ago I spoke about the Canadian National Railways being compelled to pay $1,000,000 a year more than was necessary for coal on the western division-and I presume the same is true of the eastern division-while in the United States they owned a coal mine which they had been compelled to close. How much of this deficit is due to that?

Topic:   DEPARTMENT OP RAILWAYS
Permalink
CON

Robert James Manion (Minister of Railways and Canals)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. MANION:

I cannot give any particulars to-day as to how much is due to that. Both railways in this country do patronize, so far as they can, Canadian coal mines, and without any doubt, in some instances at any rate, it costs them a little more to buy Canadian coal than it would if they chose to take coal from United States sources, but I do not think the difference amounts to any great sum of money.

This $53,000,000 odd, as the house knows and as I think my hon. friend knows although lie is asking the question as if he did not, is the difference between the net operating profits of the railwaj' and the amount of interest owed to the investing public, the interest owing to the investing public in 1932 amounting in round figures to $57,000,000 or $58,000,000, and the net profits of the railway amounting to something like $4,000,000, leaving a balance of approximately $53,000,000 which the government of Canada has to meet, being the interest on bonds purchased by various investors, the bonds to a large extent being guaranteed by the Dominion government, but raised for the necessities of the Canadian National Railways.

Topic:   DEPARTMENT OP RAILWAYS
Permalink
LIB

Edward James Young

Liberal

Mr. YOUNG:

That is very true, but when the new bill becomes law, all that this house will have to do is to vote the deficit. But the bill is not in effect now, and before we vote this deficit I think we should know how it is made up. If the statement I made a few moments ago is correct, that the western division is paying SI,000,000 more than is necessary for coal, perhaps a similar or a larger amount more than is necessary is being paid on the eastern division. I think the minister should give us that information so that we can see how the deficit is made up and whether or not we can reduce it.

Topic:   DEPARTMENT OP RAILWAYS
Permalink
CON

Robert James Manion (Minister of Railways and Canals)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. MANION:

This item will shortly come before the select standing committee on rail-

3102 COMMONS

Supply-Justice-Mounted Police

ways and shipping which examines the items of the Canadian National Railways budget, and when that committee meets, detailed information can be secured. I have not the information at hand. I did not know that anyone was going to ask for detailed information, and in any event the information is in the possession only of the management at Montreal. I could not give those details. I have given all the information I have as to the cost of coal.

Topic:   DEPARTMENT OP RAILWAYS
Permalink
LIB

Edward James Young

Liberal

Mr. YOUNG:

The trouble is that some of us are not members of the railway committee, and if we do not get the information in this house we may never get it. However, I will accept the minister's promise to let us have the information later.

Topic:   DEPARTMENT OP RAILWAYS
Permalink
CON
CON

Robert James Manion (Minister of Railways and Canals)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. MANION:

I understand that it was $4,500,000. There was a greater loss than that on American exchange, but that loss was partly made up by the favourable British exchange. The net balance against us I believe amounted to $4,500,000.

Topic:   DEPARTMENT OP RAILWAYS
Permalink

Item agreed to. Royal Canadian Mounted Police Further amount required for the services of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, the allocation of this and other votes pertaining to this service to be as treasury board may direct, with effect from April 1, 1932, notwithstanding the provisions of vote No. 202 and vote No. 277 of the main estimates, 1932-33- the amount hereby granted being the equivalent of the half-yearly payments due under the provincial agreements, such payments having been made by the several provinces and paid into the consolidated revenue fund, $357,500.


LIB

Peter John Veniot

Liberal

Mr. VENIOT:

Wrhat share of the oost of

the Royal Canadian Mounted Police was paid by the province of New Brunswick to the federal government?

Topic:   DEPARTMENT OP RAILWAYS
Permalink
CON

Hugh Guthrie (Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Hon. HUGH GUTHRIE (Minister of Justice) :

I think that information was put on Hansard a few days ago. I cannot give the figures offhand but I may say that the amount in the estimates represents the half yearly expenditure of the police in the various provinces of Canada. It is paid back into the treasury here in half yearly payments, but it goes into the consolidated revenue fund and we have to get it out. That is the object of this vote. As the provinces pay, the amount is remitted' to the consolidated revenue fund. I can furnish my hon. friend with particulars for each of the provinces. All of the provinces now have made agreements with the federal government with regard to police services except Ontario, Quebec and

British Columbia. We have no agreement with those three provinces, but the other six have all come in under an agreement.

Topic:   DEPARTMENT OP RAILWAYS
Permalink
LIB
LIB

Eugène Fiset

Liberal

Sir EUGENE FISET:

Would the minister be kind enough to tell us the total establishment of the mounted police?

Topic:   DEPARTMENT OP RAILWAYS
Permalink
CON

Hugh Guthrie (Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. GUTHRIE:

I cannot give it exactly, but it is about 2,400.

Topic:   DEPARTMENT OP RAILWAYS
Permalink
LIB

Eugène Fiset

Liberal

Sir EUGENE FISET:

Does that, include

the new services which have been taken over by the mounted police, such as customs work?

Topic:   DEPARTMENT OP RAILWAYS
Permalink
CON

Hugh Guthrie (Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. GUTHRIE:

Yes. I think the total

establishment is around 2,400 or 2,500.

Topic:   DEPARTMENT OP RAILWAYS
Permalink
LAB
CON

Hugh Guthrie (Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. GUTHRIE:

Some increase, but not a

notable one.

Topic:   DEPARTMENT OP RAILWAYS
Permalink
LIB

Charles Benjamin Howard

Liberal

Mr. HOWARD:

Possibly this is the only

item under which I can bring to the attention of the minister a matter that was drawn to my attention recently. Some time ago the mounted police purchased three motor boats for protective purposes. Those boats, under the control of the National Revenue department, were built in Canada, but the specifications called for United States motors of a size and kind which could have been just as well built in Canada. I should like to know from the minister if there was any special reason why . these patrol boats had to be engined with American motors.

Topic:   DEPARTMENT OP RAILWAYS
Permalink
CON

Hugh Guthrie (Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. GUTHRIE:

There is an explanation

but I have not it by me at the present time. However, the estimate for the mounted police will be down I hope next week, and I will have full information when it comes up for consideration. I think the boats had been ordered by another department and that the engines were placed in them before the boats came into the hands of the mounted police at all. I will have full particulars for the hon. member when the mounted police estimate comes up shortly.

Topic:   DEPARTMENT OP RAILWAYS
Permalink

March 17, 1933