May 18, 1934

LIB

William Richard Motherwell

Liberal

Mr. MOTHERWELL:

When the Prime Minister gets into his last ditch he always starts up the sob sister stuff. That is what he is doing now.

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Some hon. MEMBERS:

Carried.

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LIB

William Richard Motherwell

Liberal

Mr. MOTHERWELL:

Not until I am through. My right hon. friend is trying to make out that Canada was doing more than the United States. How much of this goes to buy poison? That is what the west was short of last year and is likely to be again.

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CON

Richard Bedford Bennett (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. BENNETT:

Not one dollar of it.

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LIB

William Richard Motherwell

Liberal

Mr. MOTHERWELL:

Everything is done except the one thing necessary. They can feed them with propaganda, but they will fatten on that alone, if you don't get the dope into them. The right hon. gentleman's remarks were aimed in my direction. Slander. There is no slander. Every word I have uttered is doubly true, and proven by the records and official estimates-

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Some hon. MEMBERS:

Question.

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LIB

William Richard Motherwell

Liberal

Mr. MOTHERWELL:

-and by the statements of the hon. members for South Battle-ford (Mr. Vallance) and Willow Bunch (Mr. Donnelly). The vote is now not half, less than half of what it was in 1931, and they try to make out that they are doing more. The Prime Minister has tried to figure it out so that it will look better by taking the forty-eight states of the American union and trying to make it appear that we in Canada have been giving more than they are giving over there. But the forty-eight states have not all got grasshoppers, any more than the nine-provinces of Canada have. It is just a lot of bunk that cannot be supported by anything but a whine. Think of the horses being allowed to die in the country, crops being put in with mules and cows and steers and oxen and anything that can go into a yoke or collar, and yet the elevators full of grain within a gunshot of these dead animals! Hundreds and thousands of them dying, and the elevators filled to the top with wheat that cannot be sold and that they don't know what to do with. But the animals know what they would do with it if they could get a gallon a day to keep them going through the winter, even if it is wheat. Letting them die! Supplying seed grain to put in another crop and then sitting back knowing that there is not one chance in ten thousand that the grasshoppers will not eat it all up again, and not supplying one dollar's worth of poison to help. Then my right hon. friend starts that whining that he can pretty nearly put across, as he has done two or three times this session, but he cannot to-night because the record is against him. He ought to be totally ashamed of himself. I say again what I said before, that neither

Supply-Entomology-Insect Pests

the national government in Washington nor that in Ottawa would have needed to help either the states there or the provinces here if the conditions were normal, if the provincial revenues were half as buoyant as they used to be. What is needed is to provide lots of poison and lots of help to distribute it. If the right hon. gentleman cannot see it, that is only evidence that this government is about the greatest aggregation of-what shall I call them?-something that can produce a marketing bill some of which no one can understand, not even themselves.

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LIB

John Vallance

Liberal

Mr. VALLANCE:

I have heard the Prime Minister on more than one occasion eulogize the people of western Canada, and I was rather disappointed to hear him to-night reminding this house of what eastern Canada has done for the west. I would like to tell him something from a different point of view. I see him smiling, but he smiles from the chair of a law office in the city of Calgary, most of the time. I want to take him back to the great open spaces where people are living 150 miles from a railroad. I want to tell him of the contribution that these people made to the making not only of western Canada but of eastern Canada. I am pleased to be able to say that in the twenty-eight years I have been there I have made my contribution, and I resent the Prime Minister's telling me and the people I represent what eastern Canada has done for them. I would like him to visualize the God-given wilderness we went into twenty-eight or thirty years ago, 100 or 150 miles from railroads, and without facilities, many of us with only an ox cart. We have built highways; we have built railroads, churches, schools, towns, villages and hamlets. We have created billions of dollars' worth of wealth, and where has it gone? Those people he talks of are sitting in those lone homesteads to-night with very little equity, if any, in what they have created, and the Prime Minister tells us what eastern Canada has done for the west. He should go out and tell them that. Where has this wealth gone? Can he tell me where it has gone? I should like him to tell the people in the west where it has gone. After all their work and privation we have to sit here tonight and they have to sit in their homes and listen to what eastern Canada has done for them. Put western Canada in the position, as I have heard him say before, where they have purchasing power, and in eastern Canada our industries will hum. Make it possible for the 300,000 farmers west of the great lakes to have 12,000 or S3,000 purchasing power, and what will happen? I am not

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blaming this government, but I am blaming the Prime Minister for the statement he has been trying to get across as to what eastern Canada has done for the west.

I would like to tell him about my own province. What do the other eight provinces get from the province of Saskatchewan? We have to take our coal from Alberta.

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CON

Richard Bedford Bennett (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. BENNETT:

No.

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LIB
CON

Richard Bedford Bennett (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. BENNETT:

One million tons were

taken from Saskatchewan this year.

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LIB

John Vallance

Liberal

Mr. VALLANCE:

Yes, from the Estevan

field going into Manitoba. We take practically all our lumber and fruit from British Columbia. We take nine out of every ten carloads of groceries from Manitoba. We take implements of production from Ontario, and some from Quebec and the maritime provinces. Yet out of the whole production of the province of Saskatchewan Canada does not take twenty per cent, and for the remaining eighty per cent we must find a world market. Then the Prime Minister wants to tell us what eastern Canada has done for us. .No, Mr. Chairman, I resent it. I have listened to him in this house pay one of the greatest tributes I ever heard anyone pay to the pioneers of western Canada, but when I listened to him remind them to-night of what eastern Canada has done you cannot wonder that I rise in indignation.

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Thomas Simpson Sproule

Mr. HPROULE:

I do not speak very often in this house, but I think it is time some hon. members opposite should stop and realize that in Canada there are some provinces besides the western provinces. There are people in Ontario who need money just as much as the western people need it, so far as that is concerned. Only a couple of years ago we gave them a five cent help on their wheat, but never got any thanks for it. They talk about grasshoppers, and to listen to the hon. member for Melville (Mr. Motherwell) one would think that there were grasshoppers only out in the west. My friend in the east told the committee that his constituency had been bothered with grasshoppers, and we have some in Ontario. But when the grasshoppers strike Ontario we look after them, and we do not complain. I believe the origin of a good deal of the trouble out in the _ west can be traced to the west. So far as this discussion is concerned, I do not think there should be any line drawn between the-east and the west. I have a good deal of respect for western members, and particularly those sitting on this side of the house. L

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do say, however, that there are a great many chronic complainers sitting opposite who are not thankful to the Ontario members who sit here and do not say a word.

The Prime Minister has just finished telling about the grants which have been made. I feel sorry for the people who have to accept what might be called the dole, but I think a little more consideration should be given to the east. It seems to me that the people in Ontario and the other eastern provinces are getting very little thanks for what they are trying to do for the people in the west. I have all kinds of faith in the west, and I do say that the remarks by the hon. member for Melville were unbecoming to him; they were very much out of place. I do not intend to take up any more time, but' if I got hotter I could say more about it.

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IND

Alan Webster Neill

Independent

Mr. NEILL:

We are a long "way from bugs, Mr. Chairman. I suggest you use your authority to stop this discussion, which will not help us any, and is merely setting the east against the west. We are getting nowhere. I appeal to my hon. friends to allow the discussion to drop. Such recriminations will not promote good will between the east and the west.

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CON

Thomas Cantley

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. CANTLEY:

I have listened with a good deal of indignation to what the hon. member for South Battleford (Mr. Yallance) has had to say. He asked what the east had done for western Canada.

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LIB
CON

Thomas Cantley

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. CANTLEY:

Well, I rather think you did, and I will tell you. In the first place, we bought it and paid for it. In the next place we built three railways to it.

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LIB
CON
CON

Richard Bedford Bennett (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. BENNETT:

The Canadian people.

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May 18, 1934