January 23, 1935

CON

Alexander James Anderson

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. A. J. ANDERSON (Toronto-High Park):

Mr. Speaker, this question seems to

have centred about the city of Toronto and the province of Ontario. I have not practised flag waving at all. As other hon. members have said I hope I am a good British subject and a first class Canadian citizen. It seems to me that what we require in Canada is cooperation in extending and building up a finer Canadian spirit than has sometimes been exhibited.

This motion is for the purpose of establishing a national flag. I must say I do not know the particular object which could be served by having another flag. People of this country so far as I can ascertain have not in any way shown any dislike for the union jack. For many years the dominions in all parts of the globe have spoken imperially and in the different conferences we have always stressed the point that we desired to continue to remain a part of the British commonwealth of nations. Up to the year 1926 we had considered our status in the empire from a legal and constitutional standpoint. It appeared to many people including myself that the tendency was toward separation rather than a continuation of a connection with the British empire. I think that feeling was apparent throughout the empire. The result was that when in 1930 representatives from various parts of the commonwealth assembled in London there was a desire, as evidenced by the addresses, to strengthen the British connection. It was urged that we had attained a certain amount of national or inter-imperial independence which greatly extended the powers of the dominions. There was a feeling however that something was lacking, and the result was that all the representatives at the conference stressed the necessity fbr something to bind the various parts of the empire together. It may be that that conference did not produce a great deal, but we find that later on those same dominions joined in an effort to strengthen their connection with the

result that the agreements of the year 1932 showed conclusively the dominions desired to remain closely connected with the motherland and with one another. In all our conferences and throughout our history our progress has been made under the union jack as it exists to-day.

For a few moments I should like to refer to those tragic days between 1914 and 1919. We saw a large army, to a great extent voluntary, proceeding across the seas to assist the motherland in her efforts to establish what she considered right. Those 500,000 men were assembled under the flag of Great Britain. So far as they were concerned there was no desire to have a distinctive flag over them. That was not necessary in order to ensure their loyalty and allegiance to the principles of British institutions and British justice. They did their best for the empire and in their great effort probably did more to advance Canadian sentiment or Canadian consciousness than had been done previously in our history. It is unfortunate that an event of such a tragic nature was necessary in order to bring about that sentiment. An observer whose statements I have read recently has said that one day he was standing near Poperinghe in the war region when a division of the Canadian army was marching towards the Somme. He states that for the first time in his life he felt a real thrill when he saw those men marching along to Canadian tunes and Canadian songs with the union jack at their head. He then began to feel that Canada had a sentiment. And that is the sentiment we ought to try to continue to-day. In my riding, which is part of the city of Toronto, there is no desire for a new flag. The sentiment is that the union jack is quite sufficient for all purposes; it represents the best there is in British traditions and in the history of the British people. It represents the best that is meant by the words Britain and British.

As regards the proposal to make the flag distinctive, we do not need anything of the kind in Canada. It might be advisable and in the interests of this country, for the sake of distinctiveness, that on the union jack there should be some design that would not to any great extent encroach upon the design of the flag as it stands now-merely something to bring out the distinctiveness of the flag as appropriate to Canada itself. But that would apply only to extraterritorial purposes, for instance, for use overseas by our embassies, in legations and so on. At any rate, so far as my own constituency is concerned, the sentiment there is that the union jack is quite

A Canadian Flag

sufficient for Canada and that any change that might be made should be simply an addition in a small way to make it distinctive of our country when it is flown abroad.

Topic:   A CANADIAN FLAG
Subtopic:   PROPOSAL FOR A NATIONAL EMBLEM ON WHICH UNION JACK SHALL BE CONSPICUOUS
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CON

William Foster Garland

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. W. F. GARLAND (Carleton):

I second the motion of the hon. member for Parry Sound for this reason. I am very much in favour of the union jack 'being left as it is, and speaking for the county of Carleton I can say that there has been no agitation to have the flag changed. In fact, if there has been any agitation in the county the feeling has been that the flag should be left as it is. I deem it my duty as the representative of that county to voice the opinion of the electors to this effect.

The amendment moved by the hon. member for Parry Sound in which he strikes out the last paragraph provides:

That the motion be amended by striking out the last paragraph; and

Adding to the first paragraph the words "which shall be the union jack, upon which for use on marine vessels and for extraterritorial places the word 'Canada' and/or such national emblems as this parliament may jpprove may be placed, but such word and/or emblems shall not occupy more than one-eighth of the surface of the flag."

That to my mind would cover everything that has been stated this afternoon. So far as Canada is concerned, the union jack would remain as it is, except that for marine and extraterritorial purposes some emblem could be added as suggested. That would cover some of the objections raised by the hon. member for Queens-Lunenburg (Mr. Ernst).

I do not want to take up the time of the house because I realize that we have more important matters to discuss; indeed, I do not see why this subject was brought up at all. The flag as it stands is good enough. It has been good enough for every Canadian since 1867 and before, and as the hon. member for East Toronto said, it is the flag under which the soldiers fought, and the flag under which they will fight again should the occasion arise.

I am very much in sympathy with the amendment and I will support it. Should the amendment be lost I will oppose the resolution as it stands.

Topic:   A CANADIAN FLAG
Subtopic:   PROPOSAL FOR A NATIONAL EMBLEM ON WHICH UNION JACK SHALL BE CONSPICUOUS
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CON

Henry Alfred Mullins

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. H. A. MULLINS (Marquette):

I

have lived under this old flag probably as long as any man in this chamber, and God forbid that there should be any change in it or that we should have any new method or doctrine such as is proposed by the younger men like the hon. member for Nanaimo (Mr. Dickie). While I was travelling in the United States a short time ago I was asked to address

a service club and in the room the union jack and the stars and stripes were placed side by side. I then quoted these lines;

Your flag, my flag-how much they hold.

Your land and my land are safe within their fold.

The union jack stands at the top of this tower and God forbid that the day should ever come when it is taken down, at any rate so long as I occupy a seat in this chamber.

I am going to be brief because I do not want to take up the time of the house, but I do not want any change in the old flag- certainly not during the period that is left to me to be a member of this house.

Topic:   A CANADIAN FLAG
Subtopic:   PROPOSAL FOR A NATIONAL EMBLEM ON WHICH UNION JACK SHALL BE CONSPICUOUS
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CON

William Ernest Tummon

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. W. E. TUMMON (South Hastings):

Notwithstanding all the arguments that have been advanced by those who have spoken in favour of a change in the flag, I am yet to be impressed that Canada needs a change in the flag, even though in any design that might be chosen it were provided that the union jack must be conspicuous. The argument put forward by hon. gentlemen that other parts of the empire have adopted a national flag does not carry great weight with me. Because one person does a certain thing is no reason why I should do it; because my neighbour intends to keep up with the Joneses is no reason why I should do the same.

I have seen numerous designs submitted by those who are in favour of a national flag for Canada but I have yet to see a design for which I should be content to vote, even if I were in favour of a change, which I am not. If those who advocate a national flag for Canada are sincere why should they not submit to this house a design and let the house decide between that design and the union jack? If that were done then we should have something definite to vote upon. But why ask this house to vote for a resolution which, if carried, implies that the house is no longer satisfied with the union jack, when those who propose the change offer nothing to take the place of our flag. Let me say to those who submit this resolution year after year that until they bring forward something better than the union jack I for one will continue to vote against their proposal.

Topic:   A CANADIAN FLAG
Subtopic:   PROPOSAL FOR A NATIONAL EMBLEM ON WHICH UNION JACK SHALL BE CONSPICUOUS
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CON

Sidney Cecil Robinson

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. S. C. ROBINSON (West Essex):

Mr. Speaker, before this resolution goes to a vote, I wish to register my protest against any change in the union jack. In the part of the country from which I come there is no agitation for a change; there is only an agitation by an organization of persons calling themselves the Native Sons of Canada and if anybody could see the abortion of a flag

A Canadian Flag

they have there to take the place of the union jack, he would be surprised; it is enough to make the majority of hon. members in the house vote against the resolution. From reading reports of their meetings I am convinced the Native Sons of Canada is an anti-British organization; it is certainly not a Conservative one. In South Africa they have had a bitter controversy about the flag and the result is that now it is the law of that country to fly the British flag with the South African.. We do not want to have any of that bitter controversy in this country. I may say that there are very strong social organizations and especially the returned soldier bodies who are bitterly opposed to any change in the union jack and unless there is a more pronounced agitation than there is at the present time for a change, I do not think we should vote in this house on the resolution which has been brought before us this afternoon. If we do so a wrong impression may go out of the country and, as the previous speaker has said, the world will think we are dissatisfied with the union jack.

In 1929 I went up the Peace river a hundred miles beyond Head of Rail and what impressed me in that country more than anything else was that during the two or three days I was up there I never saw a flag flying from the masthead anywhere except the union jack. AH foreigners who come to this country know what the union jack stands for and they are glad of its protection. If we make some new design of a flag for this country, it will take centuries to know what it stands for.

The hon. member for Queens-Lunenburg (Mr. Ernst), speaking about the legations, mentioned the foreign legation. London, England, I would like to inform him, is not a foreign legation; it is a British legation. I do not know that there is anything more I can add to what has already been said against the resolution.

Topic:   A CANADIAN FLAG
Subtopic:   PROPOSAL FOR A NATIONAL EMBLEM ON WHICH UNION JACK SHALL BE CONSPICUOUS
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CON

Onésime Gagnon

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. ONESIME GAGNON (Dorchester):

Mr. Speaker, I'did not intend to take part in this debate, but I am more or less prompted to do so by the speech of the hon. member for West Essex (Mr. Robinson) who has preceded me. Referring to the development of public opinion which in Canada is certainly very great in favour of the adoption of a national flag, he said something which was not very complimentary to the order of the Native Sons of Canada which he qualified as being an anti-British organization. I have in the past belonged to the Native Sons of Canada; I have no mandate to speak for them, but I believe they are as loyal as any

order to which the hon. member may belong. I may add this: not only the Native Sons of Canada but many other associations have expressed themselves to be in favour of the adoption of a Canadian flag and I shall recall to the hon. member who represents the city of Windsor (Mr. Robinson) a convention of the Kiwanians held in that city in 1931 and attended by thousands of members coming from different parts of Canada. I have before me a resolution which was there and then unanimously adopted by the members present at that convention. With your permission, sir, I shall read that resolution:

Whereas, in the last few years, an ever increasing number of associations, public bodies and individuals have advocated the adoption of a distinctive national flag for Canada, which would distinguish our dominion from other parts of the British empire.

Whereas, the union jack is the only official Canadian flag on land and, among the majority of citizens, there is a widespread idea that the Canadian merchant marine red ensign is the flag of Canada, an idea formed by the action of the Dominion government in authorizing its official use on Canadian public buildings, outside of Canada, to distinguish Canadian from British diplomatic headquarters.

Whereas, all British dominions, except Canada, have officially adopted distinctive national flags, so as to distinguish their country from other dominions of the British empire, supplementing the union jack which stands for empire unity.

Whereas, the government of Canada, in 1925, has judged this question important enough to name a committee to study and report on the adoption of a national flag, but the project was indefinitely postponed, although over one hundred designs for a new Canadian flag were considered by the committee.

Whereas, the above facts reflect a powerful opinion, throughout the Dominion of Canada, for the adoption of a distinctive Canadian flag, a flag which would designate Canada. Canadian institutions and Canadian people, and make for better Canadian citizenship one of the objectives of Kiwanis.

Be it resolved that the Kiwanis club of Quebec adopts the principle of a distinctive national flag for Canada, believing that it will promote Canadian citizenship, patriotism and goodwill among all classes, races and peoples of Canada and. without suggesting a design insists that no distinctive Canadian flag should '

Be it further resolved that this resolution be presented to the members of Kiwanis in convention at Windsor. Ontario, and sent to committee on public affairs for Canada, so that necessary steps will be taken to ask the Dominion government to reconsider the question of adopting a national flag for the Dominion of Canada.

That resolution was moved by Mr. Owen Callary, president of the Montreal club, and seconded by Doctor A. A. Hicky of the Ottawa club.

A Canadian Flag

Not only did the Kiwanians unanimously pass a resolution in favour of adopting a national flag for Canada, but the Association of Canadian Clubs which, if I understand aright, is not at all a disloyal institution, has also approved of the adoption of a national flag. I happen to be vice-president of the Association of Canadian Clubs, and therefore I know whereof I speak. In 1929 in the Canadian Nation, published by the Association of Canadian Clubs in Ottawa, there is the following article:

Flag Question

_ There are, it is said, some sixty-four flags in the British empire. One of them is the marine flag, the red ensign of Canada. But on land. Canadians have not a flag of their own, though they frequently use the marine flag for land purposes. What reason is there that makes it impossible for Canada to have a flag which may be properly and legally flown? Surely, there is no reason which would not also apply to the royal navy, to the commonwealth of Australia, to the province of Nova Scotia, to the crown colonies? In Canada, the reason there is no Canadian flag is. it would appear, the totally unfounded fear held' by a minority that any combination of the union jack with some Canadian symbol means a weakening of Canada's attachment to the British empire. Essentially, and, as a matter of course. Canadians want the union jack to be a major part of their flag on land, as it already is on sea. That being so, there is no argument that holds water against having such a flag. What argument is there that would not also apply to sixty-four other British flags? To the fact that Canadians have a flag so soon as they leave Canada? If. as the dubious feel, the empire, which has withstood the onslaughts of Louis. Napoleon and imperial Germany, will totter the moment Canadians have a flag as much their own as the Australian flag is Australian's, why did the empire not totter when the red ensign floated from the parliament buildings, as it did for many years? Why were Canadians not accused of a want of imperial loyalty when the Canadian corps in France flew a distinctively Canadian flag? When Bernier carried a Canadian flag to explore the arctic? There is no weight in the argument of disloyalty.

Canadians are proud to be British subjects and always have been. But do they not also want a flag, a symbol of their own to show their own pride in their own part of their own empire? We are not speaking categorically on this subject. We are only attempting to reflect an opinion which is undoubtedly powerful throughout the dominion.

In 1933 I had the honour of being invited by the Canadian Bar Association to address their annual convention at Ottawa. I chose as the title of my address, The Evolution of Canadian Autonomy, and I beg to quote a passage from what I then said:

Who has forgotten the stand taken by Sir John A. Macdonald in selecting a Canadian flag which, as you know, was

"The red ensign of the British merchant ships with the Canada coat of arms in the fly."

There I quoted Mr. John S. Ewart, a distinguished lawyer of Ottawa, who in The Kingdom Papers wrote as follows:

After floating for thirty years over every dominion public building in Canada it was through foolish misapprehension displaced and the union jack restored.

And I went on:

South Africa, New Zealand, the Irish Free State have each a national flag. Canada has none yet. So long as it has none, can it be said to be a sovereign state? Mr. Ewart says no. I do not quite agree with him, but I submit that it is not indicative of much national pride. It is, therefore, opportune that appropriate steps be taken to satisfy the aspirations of the majority of Canadians who are desirous of having a national flag which will embody the aspirations of the French and English elements and be symbolical of the heroic deeds of our great dead' and the great aspirations of our young generations.

Mr. Speaker, I do not want to compliment myself by saying that that passage received the unanimous applause of all the lawyers present, irrespective of race and party. I desire only to show that really there is in many quarters in Canada, in every province, a strong sentiment in favour of the adoption of a distinctive Canadian flag. I need not say that those who are in favour of the adoption of a national flag are not at all desirous of displacing the union jack in the love and affection which every Canadian citizen feels for it, but they wish, as did the citizens of Australia, South Africa and of all the British autonomous dominions, that Canada shall go forward, that Canada adopt a national flag which, as I said before, shall be symbolical of the heroic deeds of our great dead and of the aspirations of the young generations.

Topic:   A CANADIAN FLAG
Subtopic:   PROPOSAL FOR A NATIONAL EMBLEM ON WHICH UNION JACK SHALL BE CONSPICUOUS
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CON

John Howard Myers

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. J. H. MYERS (Queens):

Mr. Speaker, I am sorry to have to disagree for once with my hon. friend the member for Dorchester (Mr. Gagnon). In the province from which I come we have bodies that are very active: we have a branch of the Canadian legion; we have also boards of trade that take a very keen interest in any and every question affecting the welfare of our province and of Canada in general. But never on one occasion have I yet heard this flag question raised in the province of Prince Edward Island. Down there we are satisfied to go on as we have for many years under the grand old union jack, and I cannot see that any good purpose would be served by mutilating the surface of that flag either by additions or by taking anything away. It is a well known fact

Housing Policy-Mr. Church

that Canada is entirely under the protection of the British navy, over which the union jack flies, and it is my impression that at least for many years to come we should remain as we are and keep the grand old union jack as the flag of Canada.

I shall therefore feel it my duty, in view of the fact that no move has been made in our province, so far as I am aware, to change our flag, either by additions to the union jack or by the substitution of an entirely different flag, to oppose any move towards a change in this matter.

Topic:   A CANADIAN FLAG
Subtopic:   PROPOSAL FOR A NATIONAL EMBLEM ON WHICH UNION JACK SHALL BE CONSPICUOUS
Permalink
CON

Charles Hazlitt Cahan (Secretary of State of Canada)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Hon. C. H. CAHAN (Secretary of State):

The department over which I have the honour to preside is called upon very frequently to decide on the use of the flag on official occasions, and we have received during the past four years more or less correspondence with regard to the adoption of a national flag. In the hope that if the consideration of this question is further deferred-not postponed indefinitely-during the present session I may be able after consultation with my colleagues to make some definite constructive suggestion in the matter-in the hope but not in the sure confidence that I may be able to do so- I move, seconded by Mr. Guthrie, the adjournment of this debate.

Motion agreed to and debate adjourned.

Topic:   A CANADIAN FLAG
Subtopic:   PROPOSAL FOR A NATIONAL EMBLEM ON WHICH UNION JACK SHALL BE CONSPICUOUS
Permalink
LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Liberal

Mr. MACKENZIE KING:

Get on with social reform.

Topic:   A CANADIAN FLAG
Subtopic:   PROPOSAL FOR A NATIONAL EMBLEM ON WHICH UNION JACK SHALL BE CONSPICUOUS
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CON

Hugh Guthrie (Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. GUTHRIE:

I think it is reasonable to call it six o'clock. I therefore move that the house do now adjourn.

Topic:   A CANADIAN FLAG
Subtopic:   PROPOSAL FOR A NATIONAL EMBLEM ON WHICH UNION JACK SHALL BE CONSPICUOUS
Permalink
LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Liberal

Mr. MACKENZIE KING:

I do not see why we should adjourn. The next motion on the order paper is one that relates to housing and the necessity of some program of reconstruction-

Topic:   A CANADIAN FLAG
Subtopic:   PROPOSAL FOR A NATIONAL EMBLEM ON WHICH UNION JACK SHALL BE CONSPICUOUS
Permalink
CON

Hugh Guthrie (Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. GUTHRIE:

Then I withdraw my motion. We will go on.

Topic:   A CANADIAN FLAG
Subtopic:   PROPOSAL FOR A NATIONAL EMBLEM ON WHICH UNION JACK SHALL BE CONSPICUOUS
Permalink
LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Liberal

Mr. MACKENZIE KING:

I think we ought to get ahead with the social legislation as fast as we can.

Topic:   A CANADIAN FLAG
Subtopic:   PROPOSAL FOR A NATIONAL EMBLEM ON WHICH UNION JACK SHALL BE CONSPICUOUS
Permalink
?

An hon. MEMBER:

For ten years you did nothing.

Topic:   A CANADIAN FLAG
Subtopic:   PROPOSAL FOR A NATIONAL EMBLEM ON WHICH UNION JACK SHALL BE CONSPICUOUS
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LIB

Cameron Ross McIntosh

Liberal

Mr. McINTOSH:

This is not an adjournment session; this is a business session.

Topic:   A CANADIAN FLAG
Subtopic:   PROPOSAL FOR A NATIONAL EMBLEM ON WHICH UNION JACK SHALL BE CONSPICUOUS
Permalink
LIB

Joseph Philippe Baby Casgrain

Liberal

Mr. CASGRAIN:

Adjourn and go to the country.

Topic:   A CANADIAN FLAG
Subtopic:   PROPOSAL FOR A NATIONAL EMBLEM ON WHICH UNION JACK SHALL BE CONSPICUOUS
Permalink

HOUSING POLICY

PROPOSED NATIONAL POLICY OP BUILDING AND RECONSTRUCTION AS ECONOMIC AND SOCIAL NECESSITY

CON

Thomas Langton Church

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. T. L. CHURCH (East Toronto) moved:

That in the opinion of this house Canada should inaugurate at once a national housing, building and reconstruction policy adapted to its circumstances, and that such a policy is an economic and social necessity and in the best interests of the people of our country.

He said: I think this resolution is a most important one for the house to consider at the present time. It proposes that Canada shall inaugurate at once a national housing, building and reconstruction policy, adapted to its circumstances. I do not propose that we should go as far as they did in England or the United States, but rather that a survey might be made by the Department of Trade and Commerce or the Department of Labour to find out in what way the federal authority could deal with this problem. Such a policy is at the present time an economic and social necessity in the interests of the people of Canada. Unemployment is linked up with this problem, so is the health of the community. One of the reasons for the mother country recovering far faster than either the United States of America or Canada is the fact that she has taken up many of these economic problems in a big way. For example she has had sickness and unemployment insurance and old age pensions for twenty-three years, with the result that when the depression came on she was better able to deal with the evil. Also nearly one hundred years ago Lord Shaftsbury introduced his legislation to eliminate child labour and sweat shops. Those are among the main reasons why the mother country is recovering to-day more rapidly than either the United States or Canada, although they have largely the same problems.

It is the duty of a Christian country, a Christian community, to do all in its power to see to it that its citizens live in healthy homes. Housing cannot in any locality be separated from the problems of roads, light, water, sanitation or other similar questions.

One of the evils of to-day is the high mortgage rates that are charged. They are retarding progress and recovery. As I say, I cannot emphasize too strongly the necessity of the government taking some action to reduce these mortgage rates which are bearing so heavily on the poor people. In the city from which I come many old workers are losing their little homes because they cannot pay the high mortgage rates which are asked. I hope that in some way perhaps through the provinces and the municipalities, the government may take some action so that loans may be made at reasonable rates of interest to aid the reconstruction of old buildings and the construction of new houses. I believe such a step will be in the right direction, that it

Housing Policy-Mr. Church

will stimulate the building industry and create more jobs and greater employment. If such a step should be taken I believe property owners should be given the right to renew their mortgages at lower rates without the payment of any bonus. Obviously it is unfair to permit people to borrow money on new buildings at lower rates than are charged on existing mortgages. Such an arrangement in my opinion would give an unfair advantage to one class of people in selling their property in competition with others. It stands to reason that if lower rates of interest were provided a great majority of the existing mortgages would not be disturbed; the mortgagees would renew the mortgages at lower rates.

In Great Britain the Tory administration has done a great deal towards solving the housing problem. The government has definitely accepted responsibility for providing adequate housing for every working family in the land at rents within the ability of the worker to pay. There the objective is to put every family in an adequate house, and to abolish all slums. The things that Great Britain has done since the war in regard to housing are simply amazing. Local authorities and specially chartered private enterprises have built houses for 1,160,294 families of workers in the last few years, while unassisted private enterprise has built 1,150,520 more houses, some of them, though not all, for workers. So we find that nearly 3,000,000 new dwellings have been put up by old, conservative, slow-going England since the war. In Washington there are hundreds of these wretched shacks within sight of the capitol dome, occupied at very high rents, many of them unfit for human habitation, yet nothing is being done.

I believe that housing will do more than any other agency to put men back at work. In the constituency of East Toronto which I now represent there are some 300 large and small industries. I was asked to bring this question to the attention of parliament. I admit that under the British North America Act it is hard to solve any of the economic problems of this country. I think it might very well be called the passing the buck act, because that is about what it amounts to in regard to getting anything done in a practical way to relieve the workers of this country under the economic conditions from which they have been suffering for years. Among those who have been driven to the wall in these days of economic stress and strain are many skilled workers, bricklayers, plasterers, carpenters, lathers, plumbers and others. Many of these

men are losing their small homes through lack of employment. This question has been studied very carefully in many of the cities of this country, as well as in the United States and in England.

Since it is almost six o'clock, Mr. Speaker, I should be glad to postpone the remainder of my remarks until to-morrow, if it is another private members' day, though I am ready to go on now. I am just coming to a report of housing conditions in the city lof Toronto, to which I should like to refer for a few minutes. In Toronto a committee was appointed to make a survey, and that committee found conditions which should not exist in any large city, though the city council of Toronto is one of the most active and progressive councils to be found in any part of the British empire. I move the adjournment of the debate until to-morrow.

Topic:   HOUSING POLICY
Subtopic:   PROPOSED NATIONAL POLICY OP BUILDING AND RECONSTRUCTION AS ECONOMIC AND SOCIAL NECESSITY
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LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Liberal

Mr. MACKENZIE KING:

I thought what the bon. member meant was to call it six o'clock.

Topic:   HOUSING POLICY
Subtopic:   PROPOSED NATIONAL POLICY OP BUILDING AND RECONSTRUCTION AS ECONOMIC AND SOCIAL NECESSITY
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January 23, 1935