June 6, 1940


On the orders of the day:


CCF

Clarence Gillis

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. CLARENCE GILLIS (Cape Breton South):

I should like to ask the Minister

of Labour (Mr. McLarty) if he has been notified that the management of the Drummond mine at Westville, Nova Scotia, is refusing work to employees who lost time endeavouring to enlist? As a result the mine is idle. What immediate action does he propose to take to enable these men to resume their proper employment?

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LIB

Norman Alexander McLarty (Minister of Labour)

Liberal

Hon. N. A. McLARTY (Minister of Labour):

The hon. member for Cape Breton South (Mr. Gillis) was kind enough to give me notice of this question. I may state also that shortly before noon I received word from the secretary of the Canadian congress of labour along similar lines. Since that time we have been endeavouring to get in touch with the management of the mine at Westville, but without success because of an electrical storm which is now on in that district. We have been told that contact can be made in a short time. I can assure my hon. friend that every step possible will be taken to deal with the situation when the facts are definitely known.

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CIVIL SERVICE SUPERANNUATION

ORDER IN COUNCIL OF AUGUST 11, 1939, TO HAVE FORCE AND EFFECT OF STATUTE


Hon. J. L. ILSLEY (Minister of National Revenue) moved the third reading of Bill No. 28, to amend the Civil Service Superannuation Act, 1924. He said: The leader of the opposition (Mr. Hanson) asked me to get certain information and give it to the house on the third reading. He wanted to know whether the governor in council had power to pass order in council P.C. 2262, which carried out some of the recommendations of the committee that dealt with amendments to the act. I am in receipt of a memorandum from the deputy minister of justice in which he gives the opinion-begs to advise-that by virtue of section 11, subsection 3 of the Civil Service Act, the governor Unemployment Relief-Mr. Ross (St. Paul's) in council had power to enact the provisions of order in council P.C. 2262 of August 11, 1939. Motion agreed to and bill read the third time and passed.


UNEMPLOYMENT RELIEF

ALLEVIATION OF UNEMPLOYMENT AND AGRICULTURAL DISTRESS-UNDERTAKINGS IN GENERAL INTEREST AND FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE TO PROVINCES


The house resumed, from Wednesday, June 5, consideration in committee of the following resolution-Mr. McLarty-Mr. Vien in the chair: That it is expedient to bring in a measure to provide assistance in the alleviation of unemployment and agricultural distress out of moneys appropriated by parliament, and for such purpose to supplement the measures taken by the provinces towards providing assistance to those in need, establishing unemployed persons in employment and training and fitting suitable persons for productive occupations, and also to provide financial assistance to the provinces by way of loan, advance or guarantees out of unappropriated moneys in the consolidated revenue fund, and for the appointment of necessary officers, clerks and employees.


NAT

Douglas Gooderham Ross

National Government

Mr. D. G. ROSS (St. Paul's):

Last year I spoke in this house with reference to the transient unemployed in Toronto, more particularly in connection with what is known as John Frank's house, and I referred to what had been done there. There were about one hundred homeless transients who were looked after by John Frank's house and by public spirited citizens in Toronto. After they had been rehabilitated they made certain proposals to the government with respect to what might be done to continue the work of rehabilitation, but they were turned down by this government on the ground that no exception could be made. In consequence, in Toronto this year, we have again been faced with the problem of these transient young men, who might almost be called men without a country; nobody owns them, and they were forced to live in Toronto under conditions under which no one would want to have an animal live. They are certainly a fine body of young men, but they were treated terribly. This must not happen again. Some method must be devised to take care of these transients.

The same thing is true of homeless unemployed men. They do not seem to get to first base. When war was declared a good many of these transient young men came to Toronto in the hope of getting into the army. A great many of them did not even have money to get back. They had lost their jobs and for various reasons they could not get

into the army. Something must be done about them; some method must be found of taking care of them. Even if the provinces will not come to their aid the government of the dominion must. I presume the same bill that we have had in the past will emerge from this resolution. There will be practically no changes. The government, under this legislation, is trying to take care of the relief situation and of agricultural distress by the back-door method; or rather, one might say, the government is trying to work from the bottom up instead of from the top down. There is no coordination in the situation.

The report of the national employment commission was brought down in 1938, but the most important of that commission's recommendations has not been touched. It will be found at page 43 of the report. The commission declare that they have finished their work, which has been in an advisory capacity, and they report that the only possible way of taking care of the unemployment situation in Canada is, in their opinion, to establish an administrative body to work in conjunction with certain local organizations and with those citizens in the various parts of the country who are community minded. That is the most important part of the report, but nothing has been done to carry it out.

How in the world can we expect to handle the unemployment situation unless we have some dominion body who will look after it? Unemployment is not merely a problem of the individual living in some particular province. He is an unemployed Canadian and he may be employed somewhere else. There is one thing further that I would touch upon here. A few figures were given with regard to the seasonal increase in the number of people on relief. I have taken a few of these figures from the report made under the act of 1939. In September, 1937, there were

100,000 heads of families on relief and in March, 1938, there were 144,696, an increase of 44,696. In September, 1939, there were 107,696 heads of families on relief and in March, 1940, there were 138,455, an increase of 30,759. Comparing 1939-40 with 1937-38, that means a diminution of only 14,000 in the seasonal increase; yet we have had a war on since September of last year, and we still have that seasonal increase of 30,000. Then as far as individuals are concerned, we have a seasonal increase of 13,000 on relief to the end of March this year. These are urban recipients. We have a total seasonal increase of 157,000 individuals on relief in the urban centres. And we have a war on!

Day after day there come to my office in Toronto literally hundreds of people who

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Unemployment Relief-Mr. Ross (St. Paul's)

want to know where they can get work. They ask: "Why can't I get something to do? Is there any place in Canada where I can get a job? I will go anywhere, and do any kind of work." But still they cannot get to first base. They go to the employment office, and they are put on the list. Skilled workers who have had jobs are in demand, but skilled workers who have been out of work for three to six years just cannot get anything. We are going to need more workers, and the task that confronts the government at the present time is to get these men trained so that they can do the work. This cannot be done unless there is coordination, and the administration body to which I have referred should be set up to do this job. It is just the same old story all over again: year after year we come here, and great promises are made; the unemployment commission was practically going to cure relief, and the government were going to cure it as well, but it is just as it always was. There is no method; there is no driving force behind the handling of this relief situation; money is just spent in any old way, so far as I can gather. It is just a makeshift. This is surprising to me when it is considered that the Prime Minister has told us, as one hon. member mentioned before, that we have in the cabinet the best brains in Canada; yet that "best brains" outfit have not brains enough to overcome a few difficulties.

One difficulty, the government say, is that this commission recommended by the Purvis report cannot function. Have we not an interdepartmental committee as well, formed under the Purvis report? It cannot function, we are told, because the provinces will not let it function. And the best brains of Canada at the present time are trying to handle this situation from the bottom to the top. This unemployment situation has to be cleaned up. We have got to get away from the relief business; it is destroying the morale of the people. We are letting the people down. These men and women who are so anxious to do something for Canada have no leadership whatever. The government cannot tell me, with all the things we require in this country, that if this administrative body were set up there would not be coordination between it and the heads of industry and labour. I have great faith in the enterprise of our Canadian industrialists, and in our workmen as well, but they cannot get to first base unless they have leadership. That is what is required. Something must be done, and I say to the minister that as the first step he should set up that body.

We are in a war now. There may be certain constitutional difficulties, as they call

them, concerning dominion-provincial relations, but war materials have to be made; we have to see to it that these men who have been idle are trained so that they can get back to their jobs. We must remember also that the people who are going to have to make these things are people in the higher age classes. I am all in favour of youth training; it is a splendid idea, but thousands of these younger people who have enlisted and will enlist more and more as time goes on will have to be replaced by older people; and where are we going to get the skilled labour required when already we almost have a shortage of it? These men have to be trained. Before the bill to be based on this resolution is brought down we should have a clear statement of government policy with respect to this whole situation. I am afraid that the real reason we cannot get any statement of policy from the government is that they have no policy in regard to the matter. That is the answer.

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LIB

Alan Chambers

Liberal

Mr. ALAN CHAMBERS (Nanaimo):

I

have listened to what some hon. members have said with regard to non-compliance by this government with the recommendations of the national employment commission, headed by Mr. Purvis of Montreal. Hon members have before them a copy of the report made in January, 1938. Hon. members will remember that at the first session of the new parliament elected in October, 1935, in pursuance of a statement made by the Prime Minister (Mr. Mackenzie King) there was set up by this house through the National Employment Commission Bill a national employment commission which was intended to consist of representatives of labour, capital, youth, women's organizations, economic experts and so forth. The commission functioned and made reports from time to time. Several hon. members have stated categorically that none of the recommendations of this commission have been carried out. I propose to show that this statement is not quite in consonance with the facts.

The first work of the national employment commission was to find out what was the problem of unemployment in Canada, what it amounted to, how it was distributed geographically, and what form it took in the various sections of Canada. The first thing that was done, therefore-and I was glad to hear one hon. member refer to it a day or two ago-was to take a complete registration of persons on relief throughout Canada. That registration has been maintained from the time the commission ceased its work up to the present. The government, therefore, have been in a position to know continuously

Unemployment Relief-Mr. Chambers

since this first registration, what the unemployment situation has been, especially in regard to relief, in the various sections of Canada. Consequently it has been possible for the government and the Minister of Labour to formulate policies from time to time along the lines recommended by the commission to meet the varying conditions in the different parts of Canada.

Hon. members might like to have some comparison between the situation when the first registration was made and the situation at the present time. When the attack of the government on unemployment began in February, 1937, when the first registration was taken, some 260,000 fully employable persons of both sexes were receiving public assistance in Canada. In February, 1939- prior of course to the outbreak of the war, and two years after the government had begun their attack-this figure, by the application of the principles recommended by the national employment commission, had been reduced by some twenty-five per cent. The latest figure, that of January, 1940, shows a further reduction since the war began of about fifteen per cent for all Canada. These figures are from the director of unemployment relief, Department of Labour. This is in spite of a fifty per cent increase in registered unemployed persons on relief in the province of Quebec. I think you will agree with me, Mr. Chairman, that that makes a very big difference in the total figure for Canada.

In the report of the commission dated January 26, 1938, a national registration was recommended. I have dealt with that. They also recommended a nationally coordinated, directed and operated employment service. It is true that this recommendation has not been carried out; and I doubt very much if the employment commission expected it to be carried out when they made it, for this reason. I refer to the second section of the letter of transmission which accompanied the report, directed to the then minister of labour, the present Minister of National Defence:

As requested by you, the commission lias given consideration to the fact that the royal commission on dominion-provincial relations is investigating certain questions which have also come within the purview of the national employment commission. For this reason the commission has indicated in its report where certain action would, in its view, be contingent upon such financial adjustments as may emerge from the report of the royal commission on dominion-provincial relations.

It is unnecessary to remind hon. members that the report on dominion-provincial relations was tabled only at the opening of this session. I am not endeavouring in any sense

to beg the question. The remarks of the hon. member for St. Paul's (Mr. Ross) are much to the point as to the necessity for a national employment service, but he and other hon. members of this committee will recognize immediately that such a matter is an integral part of a national unemployment insurance measure, and that to have introduced it while the Sirois or Rowell commission was sitting would not have furthered any real planned attack upon unemployment.

The next recommendation of the employment commission was the setting up of a national advisory committee, and that recommendation was carried out. I know it was carried out, because I was a member of that committee. In addition to the general committee there were two committees set up to further advise the employment commission, and since the national employment commission resigned the minister has kept the members of those two committees in touch with the plans for the reconditioning and rehabilitation of both younger and older workers. They have done this work in a purely honorary capacity, not by visits to Ottawa or anything like that.

The next recommendation is one of the greatest importance, dealing with the question of the administration of assistance in connection with the reconditioning, reemployment or employment of homeless adults. These are the transients to whom the hon. member for St. Paul's referred a few moments ago. Let us see what the government have done since 1937-38 to carry out that recommendation. First of all they recommended to the provinces a farm employment plan. It was felt that if men who had worked on farms or who knew something of that work could be shown how to obtain farm employment and assisted into that employment, at least by being on the farm they would have an opportunity to take stock of their situation. I agree that it was a temporary measure, but action was taken and the recommendation of the employment commission was carried out. The recommendation was adopted by the provinces of Quebec, Manitoba, Saskatchewan, Alberta and British Columbia. In 1936-37, forty-eight thousand men were placed on farms in those provinces, of whom 22,000 remained on the farms after the period of government assistance expired. In 1937-38 some 43,000 men were placed on the farms, of whom about 15,000 remained. In 1938-39 some 32,000 were placed, of whom about 10,000 stayed on the farms. Just here I should like to interpolate that the situation described by the hon. member for St. Paul's would not exist if the government of the premier of Ontario had cooperated with

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this national government in its endeavour to take care of the transient problem in Ontario. And I should like to go further and say that if the plan for the relief of homeless, transient men in Ontario, as put forward by the Minister of Labour to the premier of Ontario, had been accepted by that province, the western provinces would not have found many hundreds of young Ontario men drifting out there, as was the case between 1936 and 1938.

In addition to the main farm employment plan there were other, supplementary plans for the provinces of Alberta, Manitoba and British Columbia, under which in 1936 some

7,000 men were placed; in 1937 some 4,500 men and approximately the same number in 1938. These supplementary plans were also open to the other provinces if they desired to take advantage of them. In addition the youth training section of the work of the Department of Labour has been open to homeless transients though they had no domicile and therefore technically were unable to take advantage of that plan. I quote from the Youth Training Act, of which paragraph (ii) of the interpretation clause states:

. . . deserving transients certified as eligible by an appropriate provincial authority. . . .

So much, then, for action along the lines of meeting the problem of homeless transient men. I would not want members of this committee to think for a moment that I consider the action taken to be completely adequate; but if I may I should like to set forth more or less exhaustively what the record indicates as having been done.

The next recommendation of the employment commission deals with the question of housing. Those who have perused the report will realize that when the employment commission began their work they found a heavy carry-over of unemployed persons from the depression and were faced with an annual increment of about 300,000 unemployed young people coming out of our places of education. On the other hand they found that with trade figures going up, employment was expanding. But they found one section of Canadian economic life in which that expansion was not taking place; that was in the construction industry. Therefore, naturally, they made several recommendations to give the building and construction industry a shot in the arm, if I may use that expression, knowing as they did and as we all know that as long as an industry of that magnitude lagged behind, a great deal of unemployment slack would remain not taken up. The government accepted that recommendation and implemented it by extending the operation of the act placed upon the statute book by the administration of

rMr. Chambers.]

Right Hon. R. B. Bennett. I am able to give the house some of the figures with regard to the implementation of that recommendation of the employment commission.

Up to May 31 of this year, 16,550 family housing units have been financed under the national housing measure, the amount of the loans being $56,000,000 and the estimated amount of construction financed about $70,000,000. The estimated expenditure for direct labour in this connection, which of course is most important since this is an unemployment relief measure, is some $27,000,000. I submit to members of the committee that this is a definite achievement.

Again, on the question of housing, I believe it was the present Minister of Labour (Mr. McLarty) who made the original suggestion at the session of 1936 that a plan such as was later introduced, namely the home improvement plan, should be instituted and put into operation. Under that plan the credit of the Dominion of Canada would be placed behind any citizen who could meet the specified regulations, and under it that citizen would be able to carry out repairs or necessary alterations to his home or to the buildings adjacent thereunto which on account of the depression he had been prevented from making.

The minister at the time accepted the recommendation and proceeded to carry out what came to be known as the home improvement plan. Up to May 31, 1940-and I am attempting to bring my figures as nearly as possible up to date-some $42,000,000 has been guaranteed on loans. The estimated direct labour cost of work done under this scheme, the assistance to tradesmen who had been either employed or unemployed, as the case may have been, amounted to $18,000,000, and the estimated man-hours of work stands at about 27,000,000.

I do not think any hon. member will disagree with me when I say that the government has implemented the recommendations of the national employment commission so far as housing is concerned. In addition to that the National Housing Act was amended by the present administration in 1938 by the addition of a section permitting municipalities to set up schemes whereby block or mass housing, commonly known as low-rental housing, might be undertaken. I agree with hon. members who say that full advantage of this opportunity has not been taken, but I believe we should continue to give credit to the government for having provided the necessary statutory authority, and I sincerely hope that hon. members may be in a position to give such advice to the government as will enable this section of the statute to become more

Unemployment Relief-Mr. Chambers

operative so as to provide better housing conditions in the slum sections of our Canadian cities.

The sixth recommendation of the national employment commission had to do with training and reconditioning. From the outset that was intended to operate in the field of youth. It was felt that among the 450,000 young unemployed men and women the depression had left as a legacy to the government which assumed office in 1935 there were many who were in need of reconditioning, whose weakened moral fibre and desire to struggle to obtain employment and whose lack of experience were tremendous factors in preventing them from gaining employment in what was then a rising or expanding employment market.

The government therefore accepted the recommendations of the national employment commission to proceed to carry out training and reconditioning. I should like to place before the committee some facts in this connection. Hon. members are no doubt aware that in the first instance training and reconditioning were carried out by virtue of the yearly legislation, similar to that which will be founded on the resolution we are now discussing. In 1939 owing to the success of those plans, a measure, upon which the Youth Training Act was founded, was introduced. May I tell hon. members that from 1937, when the first work of this kind was undertaken, until March 31, 1940, a total of 165,000 young men and women of Canada who had been unemployed received reconditioning training and rehabilitation.

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NAT

Richard Burpee Hanson (Leader of the Official Opposition)

National Government

Mr. HANSON (York-Sunbury):

How many of these youths got jobs, outside of those who went into the army?

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LIB

Alan Chambers

Liberal

Mr. CHAMBERS:

I shall be delighted to deal immediately with the question asked by the leader of the opposition. The 165.000 young men and women received training of various kinds. It has taken the form of occupational training, physical training, learner-ship and apprenticeship training, and so on. Forestry training also formed a part of the programme. Of the 48,000 who took training designed to provide immediate employment, 15,500 have been placed in permanent employment. I believe that answers sufficiently the question I have been asked. Under the scheme

3,400,000 days training have been given.

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CCF

Percy Ellis Wright

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. WRIGHT:

Do those who were placed in permanent employment include men who took the short agricultural courses in the west, men who had come from farms and then returned to their farms?

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LIB

Alan Chambers

Liberal

Mr. CHAMBERS:

No. The hon. member is referring to what is described as occupational training; those persons would not come within the figures I have just given. They are included, of course, in the total figure of 165,000, but not in the 48,000.

I am glad the hon. member asked that question, because it gives me the opportunity to tell the committee that in addition to the forms of training I have described we have also had agricultural short-course training, and agricultural training in local centres, particularly in the western provinces. All this has been done under the youth training programme. So much for recommendation No. 6.

Recommendation No. 7 dealt with public works. The recommendation of the commission was that public works programmes should be contracted. It was felt by the national employment commission, if my interpretation is correct, that to go ahead and spend large sums of money did not direct or focus the intention of the government sufficiently upon the unemployed themselves. In other words it was established by the economic advisers of the commission that of 8100 spent on ordinary publics works programmes only $31 would find its way into the pockets of labouring men, and that the balance was paid for administration and, more particularly, for supplies.

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NAT

Richard Burpee Hanson (Leader of the Official Opposition)

National Government

Mr. HANSON (York-Sunbury):

Material would be the largest item.

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LIB

Alan Chambers

Liberal

Mr. CHAMBERS:

Yes; I did refer to supplies. In other words one might say there was a wastage of nearly 70 per cent of the $100 to be spent on public works. The national employment commission therefore recommended contraction in the expenditures on public works. The report contains the recommendation that public works when undertaken by joint agreement between the provinces and the dominion, through the expenditure of moneys supplied by the Department of Labour, should wherever possible help particularly those in need, and that the highest possible labour content per dollar of expenditure should be arranged.

I have the pleasure of telling hon. members that this policy adopted by the Minister of Labour and by the provinces in connection with the expenditure of these funds has raised the labour content of each dollar expended from 31 cents on the dollar to over 80 cents on the dollar, and that in pursuance of the carrying out of this recommendation many miles of tourist roads have been built in various sections of Canada, and many new mining areas have been opened for further development, at a crucial time in Canada's history. This has resulted from the carrying

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out, by the Minister of Labour and his associates in the government, of the recommendations of the report.

The eighth recommendation of the commission had to do with agricultural relief. It was felt by the commissioners that the relief situation and the methods of handling relief in provinces preponderantly agricultural were not what they should be. The report states that the recommendation has not been implemented. We must remember that the report was made in 1938, and may I say at this time that in so far as the government has been able to implement the report, it has been implemented. The successful operation of a scheme of that kind must depend upon two parties, namely, the provincial government in question and the dominion government. Naturally the provincial government had ideas of their own on the subject. Nevertheless a great deal of assistance has been given to the three provincial governments of preponderantly agricultural provinces by virtue of the Prairie Farm Rehabilitation Act and the Prairie Farm Assistance Act, both of which have been utilized to carry out the recommendations of the national employment commission. I could give the committee figures on that, but I do not want to be too dry.

The ninth point of the commission's recommendations concerns auditing. It was felt that the old system of post auditing of relief accounts did not allow the heads of provincial governments or of municipalities to arrive at an understanding of what their policy should be, because they did not know their financial position as they should know it when called upon to make a new agreement with the dominion at the beginning of the fiscal year. The recommendation of the commission that a current audit should be set up in place of a post audit has been carried out.

Recommendation No. 10, for the organization and coordination of aid, has also been carried out in so far as it has been practicable and acceptable to the provincial governments, which, as I say, must agree to the changes suggested by the dominion government.

In addition there were several general recommendations which are not contained specifically in the schedule of recommendations but which are of importance, and upon those I should like to dwell for a few moments.

There was the question of rehabilitation through land settlement. It is mainly in the province of Quebec that anything has been done along these lines, and there some 4,000 families have been settled.

The recommendation as to the establishment in the Labour department of a women's bureau has been implemented by the appointment of

Miss Alexander, of Winnipeg, as assistant to the supervisor of the youth training plan in the department, to carry out the training and reconditioning of youth.

The rehabilitation of older workers has also been carried out. In the last two and a half years some 9,000 of these older workers have received training and reconditioning.

A further recommendation dealt with the establishment of a division in the Department of Labour for extending the learner-ships and apprenticeships plan. That also has been carried out by the appointment of a supervisor of the youth training plan.

That, Mr. Chairman, is a brief summary of the carrying out of the plans recommended by the national employment commission. The question has also been raised, what is the situation now that war has broken out? What is the position with regard to the mobilization of man-power? What can be done and what should be done? With regard to training persons who are unemployed to meet the demands for labour, I am sure that the hon. member for St, Paul's does not consider that he can make a skilled workman in a very short time. I also noted that he said he had great faith in the manufacturing industries of Canada. I have too, but I should like to tell the members of this committee that the national advisory committee to which I have referred, and of which I was a member, sent out a questionnaire to the organization of manufacturers of Canada, pointing out to them that with an expanding trade market it must be recognized that sooner or later there would be a big demand for skilled workers, and pointing out too that there was a great number of younger men who were then unemployed-and after all you should be able to train them better than the older men-and they were asked how about preparing for this demand before it actually came. We sent them a simple questionnaire consisting of three questions, and I should like to tell the committee what the result of that was, without any prejudice. The first question was-and do not forget that the questionnaire was sent to almost every manufacturing business right across Canada: Do you find that in your business you are facing a shortage of skilled labour? We made a composite answer of the replies received, and the composite answer was yes. They did not say that they had a shortage at that time, but rather that they were facing a possible Shortage of skilled labour.

The second question was: Do you not think that something should be done in the form of training to prepare for the inevitable demand for skilled workers, which by your own admission you anticipate? The composite answer to that was yes, we do.

Unemployment Relief-Mr. Chambers

The third question was: Do you think that the training should be done by you in your own business, and are you prepared to do it, or do you think it should be done by the government? The composite answer of the manufacturers to whom the hon. member for St. Paul's has referred was: No, we should not do it ourselves, and no, it certainly should not be done by the government. That is a matter of record.

Although it is of little use to refer to these things, when one considers that the labour problem in the manufacture throughout Canada of equipment necessary to the war effort is largely going to be a matter of quickly adapting more or less skilled labour to mass production, I do not think the question is entirely irrelevant.

The hon. member for Peel asked why it was that in view of the large amount of war orders that have been placed in Canada there should be at the end of April a large number of persons still receiving public assistance. May I run very briefly over the unemployment situation in each province since the war broke out.

At the present time in Nova Scotia the relief figures reflect an improvement in employment. The total numbers of employable persons on relief have been reduced by between 60 and 70 per cent of the number in the previous year. In Prince Edward Island the relief totals since January have been higher than those of a year ago, owing to a change in the loan policy which has officially added 950 fishermen to the relief rolls because assistance was given in the form of loans. That is not necessarily relief. In the province from which the hon. leader of the opposition (Mr. Hanson) comes, I know that it will be a source of great pride to him to know that there have been no registered persons on relief for some time past.

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NAT

Richard Burpee Hanson (Leader of the Official Opposition)

National Government

Mr. HANSON (York-Sunbury):

Will the hon. member allow me to tell him why? There is no relief administered by the government of the province-not that there is no necessity for relief, but they just cut them off. The cities are giving relief because they are obliged to do so.

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LIB

Alan Chambers

Liberal

Mr. CHAMBERS:

I think the leader of the opposition will bear with me when I say that so far as reports made by leaders of the government of New Brunswick to the Minister of Labour here are concerned, there is no reference to persons on relief.

Topic:   UNEMPLOYMENT RELIEF
Subtopic:   ALLEVIATION OF UNEMPLOYMENT AND AGRICULTURAL DISTRESS-UNDERTAKINGS IN GENERAL INTEREST AND FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE TO PROVINCES
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NAT

Richard Burpee Hanson (Leader of the Official Opposition)

National Government

Mr. HANSON (York-Sunbury):

There is no registration. They just cut them off and let them shift for themselves.

Topic:   UNEMPLOYMENT RELIEF
Subtopic:   ALLEVIATION OF UNEMPLOYMENT AND AGRICULTURAL DISTRESS-UNDERTAKINGS IN GENERAL INTEREST AND FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE TO PROVINCES
Permalink

June 6, 1940