July 15, 1940

LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Right Hon. W. L. MACKENZIE KING (Prime Minister):

Mr. Speaker, I should like to say one word on this matter. I agree with the hon. member that it does seem a waste of time to sit here and simply give formal assent to bills of the category before us coming from the other house. I would point out, however, that it is not quite as bad as if we had to consider the bills in the first instance, and had not adopted the practice of leaving the investigation of these matters to a committee in the other house.

Periodically we have heard discussions similar to that which has taken place to-day. Only a few years ago such discussion did result in some progress being made, in that additional courts were established in the provinces to deal with divorce. The government of the day hoped, I believe, as hon. members generally hoped, that all the provinces would follow that example. I believe there remains only one province in which divorce courts are not to be found, and perhaps the discussion this afternoon may serve in some measure to advance the day when divorce courts will be set up in the remaining province.

I believe all I can say at the moment is that it should be remembered the obligation of dealing with divorce is placed on parliament by the British North America Act. Without taking pretty radical steps we cannot very well divest ourselves of that power and authority. Parliament has decided that the best way in which to meet the obligation is to have a special committee in one of the houses, and to deal in the main with all such matters there.

I cannot understand why there should be any reflection upon the proceedings of that committee. Possibly some hon. members know more about it than I do, but I would hardly think that any reference to collusion in connection with proceedings of a committee in another house would be in place here. All I can say at the moment is that naturally the government will give consideration to the discussion which has taken place this afternoon. Whether or not at this session it is going to be possible to adopt a different method, I cannot say. I imagine we shall have to put up with the present practice for at least the balance of the present session.

But I should not like the impression to go abroad that these are bills of a nature which parliament can refuse to entertain, so long as the obligation to legislate with respect to divorce is placed upon the federal parliament under the constitution.

I do say it is better to have consideration of these matters in the first instance in another house, where possibly they have more time for such matters than we have here, and for us to perform our part either of refusing altogether to agree to what has been done elsewhere, or of accepting what has been done in the more or less formal manner in which thus far we have been obliged to accept it.

Topic:   PRIVATE BILLS
Subtopic:   CONSIDERED IN COMMITTEE-THIRD READING
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NAT

Richard Burpee Hanson (Leader of the Official Opposition)

National Government

Hon. R. B. HANSON (Leader of the Opposition) :

Mr. Speaker, there are one or two

observations I should like to make. I did not quite hear the 'allusion of the hon. member for Macleod (Mr. Hansell) who first raised the matter for discussion. However if I understood him correctly he said that a situation had developed wherein divorce bills were allowed to pass through the senate when it was apparent that there had been collusion. If that is what the hon. member said, then we ought to take exception to that statement. At all events some reference was made by him to collusion, and if I did not hear correctly, I am sorry.

Topic:   PRIVATE BILLS
Subtopic:   CONSIDERED IN COMMITTEE-THIRD READING
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SC

Ernest George Hansell

Social Credit

Mr. HANSELL:

The hon. member has not quoted me correctly. I was referring to the necessity for examination.

Topic:   PRIVATE BILLS
Subtopic:   CONSIDERED IN COMMITTEE-THIRD READING
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NAT

Richard Burpee Hanson (Leader of the Official Opposition)

National Government

Mr. HANSON (York-Sunbury):

I heard

that.

Topic:   PRIVATE BILLS
Subtopic:   CONSIDERED IN COMMITTEE-THIRD READING
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SC

Ernest George Hansell

Social Credit

Mr. HANSELL:

I was referring to a specific court case, and was showing how by crossexamination we may be able to prevent such things as collusion.

Topic:   PRIVATE BILLS
Subtopic:   CONSIDERED IN COMMITTEE-THIRD READING
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NAT

Richard Burpee Hanson (Leader of the Official Opposition)

National Government

Mr. HANSON (York-Sunbury):

Of course there is ample opportunity for cross-examination. The point I make is this. I know the gentleman who is chairman of the divorce committee of the senate. He is a fine and upright man who would not wink at collusion or anything of the kind while that committee sits under his chairmanship. I should not like to have anything said in this chamber which would cast 'any reflection upon that gentleman, who sits in the other house. 1 believe that much against his will he is performing an important public duty which under our constitution is placed upon his shoulders, and I should not like any reflection to go out from this house respecting the way in which justice-because after all it is justice- is administered in another place.

British Children

Topic:   PRIVATE BILLS
Subtopic:   CONSIDERED IN COMMITTEE-THIRD READING
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OTTAWA ELECTRIC COMPANY AND OTTAWA GAS COMPANY


Mr. G. J. McILRAITH (Ottawa West) moved that the house go into committee to consider Bill No. 34, respecting the Ottawa Electric Company and the Ottawa Gas Company. Motion agreed to, bill considered in committee, reported, read the third time and passed.


UNEMPLOYMENT INSURANCE

FUND TO BE ADMINISTERED BY COMMISSION ASSISTED BY ADVISORY COMMITTEE-PROVISION FOR EMPLOYMENT SERVICE


Hon. N. A. McLARTY (Minister of Labour) moved that the house go into committee at the next sitting to consider the following resolution: That it is expedient to introduce a bill to enact a scheme of national unemployment insurance to be administered by a commission appointed by the governor in council, and to create an unemployment insurance fund from contributions from specified persons and from moneys provided by parliament, for the payment of insurance benefits, to be administered by the commission assisted by an advisory committee; with provision also for the organization and maintenance of an employment service administered by the commission with the advice and assistance of a national employment committee; also with power to the governor in council to establish committees and boards subsidiary to the commission and to enter into agreements with the governments of other countries for reciprocal arrangements relating to unemployment insurance; with provision for the remuneration of the commissioners and the appointment and remuneration of such officers, clerks and employees as may be required for the due carrying out of the provisions of the act and for the costs of administration. He said: His Excellency the Governor General, having been made acquainted with the subject maitter of this resolution, recommends it to the consideration of the house. Motion agreed to.


BRITISH CHILDREN

POSITION OF BRITISH GOVERNMENT WITH RESPECT TO SPONSORED PROGRAMME


On the orders of the day: Hon. GROTE STIRLING (Yale); The leader of the opposition (Mr. Hanson) has been called out for a moment, but he asked me to ask the following question of the Minister of Mines and Resources (Mr. Crerar). Will the minister make a clarifying statement on the position of the British government with respect to the sponsored programme for sending British children to Canada? Press reports indicate that the British government has greatly modified its earlier evacuation programme, and this has led to confusion in Canada. Second, has this government taken any action in the meanwhile to curtail the evacuation of British or other children to Canada under private auspices? What is the true present position in respect of all these matters?


LIB

Thomas Alexander Crerar (Minister of Mines and Resources)

Liberal

Hon. T. A. CRERAR (Minister of Mines and Resources):

Mr. Speaker, I am not in position to make a clarifying statement on the position of the British government with respect to the matter referred to in the question; indeed it would be presumptuous on my part to do so. With regard to the second part of the question, I may say that up to the present time, as I have said in the house before, no obstacles have been placed in the way of the movement of children or other British people to Canada under private auspices or under arrangements which they may be able to make themselves. Instructions to that effect were sent many weeks ago to our immigration office in London. It may perhaps be necessary for us to examine more closely than we have in the past the movement of certain groups of children, such as school children, from a private school in Great Britain to a private school in Canada. Within the last few weeks there have been a few instances in which such movements have taken place apparently under the misapprehension that funds were available for the maintenance of the children in Canada. The immigration officers were under the impression that this arrangement had been made when as a matter of fact it was not completed. I think the house will agree that it is not desirable that children in a private school in Grea/t Britain should move to Canada unless some arrangement has been made for their maintenance here and the payment of their tuition. This is all I can usefully say on the question.

Topic:   BRITISH CHILDREN
Subtopic:   POSITION OF BRITISH GOVERNMENT WITH RESPECT TO SPONSORED PROGRAMME
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WAYS AND MEANS

SPECIAL WAR REVENUE ACT


The house in committee of ways and means, Mr. Macdonald (Brantford City) in the chair. 7. That schedule I to the said act be amended by repealing section 1 thereof and substituting therefor the following: "1. (a) Automobile adapted or adaptable for passenger use, with seating capacity for not more than ten persons each, valued at $700 or less, 10 per cent. Over $700 but not more than $900, 10 per cent on $700 plus 20 per cent on the amount in excess of $700. Special War Revenue Act Over $900 but not more than $1,200, 10 per cent on $700 plus 20 per cent on $200 plus 40 per cent on the amount in excess of $900. Over $1,200, 10 per cent on $700 plus 20 per cent on $200 plus 40 per cent on $300 plus 80 per cent on the amount in excess of $1,200. (b) Automobiles adapted or adaptable for passenger use with seating capacity for more than ten persons, 5 per cent. Provided that the tax collected under paragraph (b) above shall in no case exceed $250 per automobile; Provided further that the tax on automobiles shall apply on the total price charged for such automobiles, which price shall include all charges for accessories, optional equipment, servicing, financing, warranty or any other charge contracted for at time of sale, whether charged for separately or not, but not to include heaters or radios; Provided further that the tax on automobiles shall apply to any such vehicles in transit to dealers or others; Provided that if a new and unused automobile is on the twenty-fifth day of June, one thousand nine hundred and forty, in the hands of a dealer and not delivered to another purchaser the tax shall be paid by such dealer when such automobile is delivered. Provided further that the tax shall not apply to automobiles imported: (i) Under customs tariff items 702, 706, 707 and 708: (ii) By a bona fide settler on a first arrival; (iiil By a beneficiary resident in Canada, under the terms of a will of a person dying in a foreign country."


?

Angus Lewis Macdonald (Minister of National Defence for Naval Services)

The ACTING CHAIRMAN (Mr. Macdonald, Brantford City):

An amendment has

been moved to this resolution which reads:

That paragraph 7 of the resolution proposing amendments to the Special War Revenue Act, notice of which was given on June 24, 1940, be amended by striking out the fourth proviso reading as follows:

"Provided that if a new and unused automobile is on the twenty-fifth day of June, one thousand nine hundred and forty, in the hands of a dealer and not delivered to another purchaser the tax shall be paid by such dealer when such automobile is delivered."

and substituting therefor the following:

"Provided that in the case of every new and unused automobile in the possession of an automobile dealer on the twenty-fifth day of June, one thousand nine hundred and forty there shall be imposed, levied and collected an excise tax of ten per cent based, in the case of an imported automobile, on the duty paid value and. in the case of an automobile manufactured in Canada, on the sale price of the manufacturer to the dealer payable at the time of the delivery by such dealer of such new and unused automobile to a purchaser: And provided further that the minister shall have power to define for the purpose of this section what constitutes a new and unused automobile: And provided further that a refund or deduction may be granted to an automobile dealer liable to pay excise tax under this provision in respect of ar automobile, of the amount of excise tax previously paid in respect of such automobile under the provisions of this part."

Shall the amendment carry?

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS
Subtopic:   SPECIAL WAR REVENUE ACT
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NAT

John Ritchie MacNicol

National Government

Mr. MacNICOL:

I believe the minister was to give us some information in connection with automobiles in transit.

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS
Subtopic:   SPECIAL WAR REVENUE ACT
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July 15, 1940