March 29, 1943

WAR RISK INSURANCE-MUNITIONS OR EXPLOSIVES

LIB

Mr. MARTIN:

Liberal

1. Is it considered that the War Risk Insurance Act passed in 1942 extends to cover loss resulting from the explosion of a concentration of munitions or explosives being lawfully manufactured, stored or transported for war purposes within the three- or twelve-mile limit of Canada?

2. Does the War Risk Insurance Act extend to cover loss incurred in Canada as the result of an explosion of a concentration of munitions either on the American shore or being transported on any body of water separating the Canadian and American boundaries?

3. If the said act does not cover such latter situation will consideration be given by the government to provide for such a contingency?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   WAR RISK INSURANCE-MUNITIONS OR EXPLOSIVES
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LIB

Mr. ILSLEY: (Minister of Finance and Receiver General)

Liberal

1. Under the War Risk Insurance Act war damage is defined as including " damage caused by the explosion of a concentration of munitions or explosives being lawfully manufactured, stored or transported in Canada for war purposes by any person other than the insured."

It is a question of law whether a given point is in Canada or outside Canada.

2. Loss resulting from a concentration of munitions on the American shore is not covered and loss resulting from explosion of munitions being transported on any body of water separating Canada and the United States is not covered unless the explosives are within Canadian territorial waters or being shipped between two Canadian ports as provided by section 14 of the act.

3. This question relates to a matter of policy and it is not the practice of the government to disclose matters of policy in giving answers to questions.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   WAR RISK INSURANCE-MUNITIONS OR EXPLOSIVES
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NOVA SCOTIA AIRCRAFT PLANTS

CCF

Mr. GILLIS:

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

1. What has been the cost to date of the plants of the Clark Ruse Aircraft Limited, at Lakeburn and Eastern Passage, Nova Scotia?

Questions

2. What will be the total cost of each one when completed?

3. Who are the contractors of each?

4. Are the contracts let on a cost-plus basis?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   NOVA SCOTIA AIRCRAFT PLANTS
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LIB

Mr. HOWE: (Minister of Munitions and Supply)

Liberal

1. The cost to date of the plant at Dartmouth is $1,149,870. The cost to date of the plant at Moncton is $881,250.

2. It is estimated that the cost of the plant at Dartmouth when completed will be $1

150,000. It is estimated that the cost of the plant at Moncton when completed will be $902,500.

3. The contractors at Dartmouth are: Foundation Maritime Limited; T. C. Gorman Maritime Limited; Dominion Bridge Company Limited; Acadia Construction Company Limited.

The contractors at Moncton are: Ambrose Wheeler, Limited; Chris Keenan & Sons; Acme Construction Company Limited; Canadian Comstock Company Limited; "Automatic" Sprinkler Co. of Canada Limited.

4. All contracts for both Dartmouth and Moncton were let on a competitive price basis with the exception of $248,700 at Dartmouth which is let on a cost-plus basis to the Foundation Maritime Limited, and $50,000 at Moncton awarded to Acme Construction Company Limited on a cost-plus basis.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   NOVA SCOTIA AIRCRAFT PLANTS
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WESTERN GRAIN CROP

CCF

Mr. CASTLEDEN:

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

1. How many grain delivery points in the west is it possible for the farmer to deliver the quota allotted to that point?

2. What is the estimated crop production of the western provinces for 1942 of, .(a) wheat, (b) coarse grains?

3. What are the approximate deliveries of, (a) wheat, (b) coarse grains, made in the west between August 15 and December 31, 1942?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   WESTERN GRAIN CROP
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LIB

Mr. MacKINNON (Edmonton West): (Minister of Trade and Commerce)

Liberal

1. Owing to the fact that not all producers deliver wheat on each successive quota established and owing to the fact that delivery quotas are established on the total authorized acreage at each delivery point, delivery quotas generally provide for the delivery of wheat moderately over space available. Where producers, for one reason or another, do not deliver wheat in accordance with the quotas established, the board follows the practice of making such space available to those producers who do wish to deliver wheat.

On March 18, 1942, about 800 delivery points had delivery quotas closely balanced with available storage. At about 1,300 delivery points, delivery quotas were moderately in excess of storage available and these points included:

(1) All delivery points where all or part of the 1942 wheat crop is unthreshed. At these points wheat quotas have been advanced to permit the marketing of as much wheat as possible by those producers who threshed last fall.

(2) All delivery points where available storage, which for one reason or another has not been used and where delivery quotas have been increased for the benefit of those producers desiring to deliver wheat.

(3) All delivery points where authorized wheat acreage is such that a lower wheat quota would result in waste space. In these cases the quota is increased, even though the next highest delivery quota presses on available space.

(4) All delivery points where outstanding car authorizations must be completed to permit the marketing of existing delivery quota,

2. (a) Prairie provinces-wheat, 565,000,009 bushels; (b) Prairie provinces-Oats, 500,000,000 bushels; barley, 241,000,000 bushels; rye,

23,000,000 bushels.

3. (a) Wheat -144.1721329 bushels; (b) Oats-47,111,072 bushels;' barley-40,357,191 bushels; rye-3,616,501 bushels.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   WESTERN GRAIN CROP
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ASSOCIATED CREDIT BUREAU OF CANADA LIMITED

BPC

Mr. GAUTHIER:

Bloc populaire canadien

1. Has the Associated Credit Bureau of Canada, Ltd., a federal charter?

2. If so, in what year was it incorporated and what are the names of its directors?

3. Does it also possess a provincial charter?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   ASSOCIATED CREDIT BUREAU OF CANADA LIMITED
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LIB

Mr. McLARTY: (Secretary of State of Canada)

Liberal

1. Yes.

2. Incorporated by letters patent under the Companies Act dated the 1st May, 1939.

According to the annual summary filed under oath by the company covering the fiscal year ending 31st March, 1942, its directors at that time were as follows: Thomas Downie, F. A. Matatall, E. L. Silver, H. O. Schultz, W. G. Murdoch, J. E. Shapland, I. H. Suydam, F. E. Womersley.

3. No, so far as the Secretary of State Department is aware.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   ASSOCIATED CREDIT BUREAU OF CANADA LIMITED
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SMELTING OF COBALT ORES

CCF

Mr. NOSEWORTHY:

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

1. Was the Canadian metals controller asked by Washington to express his opinion on the future of the Cobalt camp and the advisability of a smelter being constructed there for the treatment of cobalt ores?

2. If so, what was his answer?

3. Why is not John A. Reid's full and original report available to the public?

4. Did Read in his report recommend to the government that a certain amount of money be advanced to further develop certain properties in Cobalt with a view to increasing production?

Questions

5. Did Dr. F. W. James recommend to the Canadian metals controller that a certain amount of money be advanced or made available by the government for the same purpose?

6. If so, what was the amount and which properties were recommended for such development and why were these recommendations not acted upon?

7. Has the government knowledge that for many years a cartel or cobalt trust existed which completely controlled the market and price?

8. Has the government knowledge that large German interests were part of this trust, and to a large extent controlled the smelting of cobalt ores?

9. Has the government knowledge that the Deloro Smelting & Refining Company were a part of this trust or cartel?

10. Has the government knowledge that this cartel existed and functioned as late as 1942?

11. In connection with the survey being made to increase production of arsenic, what attention was given to cobalt and what were the results of such survey?

12. Is there any one on the official staff of the metals controller who was formerly an employee of the Deloro Smelting and Refining Company; if so, who is this?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   SMELTING OF COBALT ORES
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LIB

Clarence Decatur Howe (Minister of Munitions and Supply)

Liberal

Mr. HOWE:

1 and 2. In the spring of 1942 the Canadian metala controller effected arrangements with the Metals Reserve company of Washington under which the latter agreed to purchase the cobalt ores produced in the Cobalt camp up to the end of 1943. Subsequently the Canadian metals controller asked the authorities in Washington if they would be prepared to consider the erection of a smelter in the Cobalt camp for the treatment of these ores or an extension to the existing Canadian smelter for the same purpose, and was advised that the Washington authorities would not be prepared to finance or approve the erection of additional smelting facilities in Canada for this purpose.

3. This report is the property of the Ontario government.

4. No.

5. Yes.

6. (a) $100,000; (b) no specific properties were recommended; (c) the Canadian production of refined cobalt metal and oxides is approximately six times Canada's own requirements, the balance going to the United Kingdom under contract. The arrangement effected with the Metals Reserve was to provide insurance to the United States against a loss of supplies from Africa. Because the ores from the Cobalt camp were being purchased for the account of the United States government, it was felt that any expenditures for further expansion of ore production should be financed by the Metals Reserve. The Canadian metals controller made recommendations to the Metals Reserve, which, among other things, included the setting up of a fund of $100,000 to unwater and rehabilitate mines in the Cobalt area. The Metals Reserve did not approve these recommendations.

7. 8 and 9. No information.

10. No.

11. The ores being purchased for the account of the Metals Reserve, most of which have been stockpiled in Canada, constitute a possible source of arsenic if treated in Canada.

12. No.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   SMELTING OF COBALT ORES
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TAXES OX BEER AND SPIRITS

LIB

Thomas Hambly Ross

Liberal

Mr. ROSS (Hamilton East):

What was the amount of tax collected in each of the calendar years, 1938, 1939, 1940, 1941 and 1942 on, (a) beer, (b) hard liquors?

Mr. GIBSON;

Excise duty collected on matured spirits, malt and dutiable beer, during the calendar years

1938 to 1942, both inclusive

Year Matured spirits Dutiable beer Malt1938

$ 9,199,010 59 $273,911 20 $ 8,324,022 481939

10,751,528 94 262204 15 9,918,936 181940

14,851,809 00 314.117 22 15,996,630 901941

18,925,353 98 390,157 96 23,051,539 031942

31,992,894 80 561,169 61 33,965,086 88

Sales tax on any one commodity not available.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   TAXES OX BEER AND SPIRITS
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PRODUCTION OF SYNTHETIC RUBBER FROM INDUSTRIAL ALCOHOL

PC

Mr. BENCE:

Progressive Conservative

1. Was any of the industrial alcohol produced in Canada in 1942 used for the manufacture of synthetic rubber?

2. If so, where was such synthetic rubber manufactured?

3. Will any of the industrial alcohol to be produced in 1943 be used in the manufacture of synthetic rubber?

4. If so, where will such synthetic rubber be produced?

Questions

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   PRODUCTION OF SYNTHETIC RUBBER FROM INDUSTRIAL ALCOHOL
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LIB

Mr. HOWE: (Minister of Munitions and Supply)

Liberal

1. No.

2. Answered by No. 1.

3. Present plans do not include the use of industrial alcohol for the manufacture of synthetic rubber.

4. Answered by No. 3.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   PRODUCTION OF SYNTHETIC RUBBER FROM INDUSTRIAL ALCOHOL
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March 29, 1943