June 1, 1944

NAT

Grote Stirling

National Government

Mr. STIRLING:

In the next few days

there is going to be a determined attempt all across Canada to collect waste paper for war purposes. Can the parliamentary assistant assure us that the tons of paper which go out of this building will reach that beneficial end?

Topic:   DEPARTMENT OF FINANCE
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LIB

Douglas Charles Abbott (Parliamentary Assistant to the Minister of Finance)

Liberal

Mr. ABBOTT:

I would hesitate to give that assurance.

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NAT
LIB

Douglas Charles Abbott (Parliamentary Assistant to the Minister of Finance)

Liberal

Mr. ABBOTT:

All these items, of course,

were prepared some months ago, and I think were in Hansard in February. Wartime Salvage Limited is now in process of liquidation, and it is anticipated that it will cease all operations within the next month or so. Of the total amount of $500,000 provided by -the estimates to cover the company's administrative expenses and losses for the fiscal year 1944-45 it is now anticipated that $30,000 at the very most will be required. The remainder of the amount required will revert to the war appropriation; and the activities which were formerly carried on by Wartime Salvage Limited under the wartime prices and trade board will, I understand, be carried on by the Department of National War Services, and the costs probably paid by the Commodity Prices Stabilization Corporation.

Topic:   DEPARTMENT OF FINANCE
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NAT

Grote Stirling

National Government

Mr. STIRLING:

Can the parliamentary

assistant tell us what does happen to the wastepaper from this building?

Address oj Right Hon. John Curtin

Topic:   DEPARTMENT OF FINANCE
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LIB

James Lorimer Ilsley (Minister of Finance and Receiver General)

Liberal

Mr. ILSLEY:

The hon. member for Ottawa West tells me there is keen contest as between contractors or bidders for the paper which leaves this building, and it all goes into use in that way.

Topic:   DEPARTMENT OF FINANCE
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NAT
LIB

James Lorimer Ilsley (Minister of Finance and Receiver General)

Liberal

Mr. ILSLEY:

War and peace uses. I do

not think you can trace through a particular lot of wastepaper into war use; but there is a great need for wastepaper now. What the hon. gentleman is interested in is whether this is being used. It is being tendered for and bought and used.

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NAT
LIB
NAT
LIB

Douglas Charles Abbott (Parliamentary Assistant to the Minister of Finance)

Liberal

Mr. ABBOTT:

The officers are set out in the report which was tabled two or three months ago: President, Mr. W. A. Bark; vicepresident, Mr. R. Geddes; treasurer, Mr. C. F. Butler; Mr. C. W. Younger; and the director is Mr. Charles LaFerle.

Topic:   DEPARTMENT OF FINANCE
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NAT
LIB

Douglas Charles Abbott (Parliamentary Assistant to the Minister of Finance)

Liberal

Mr. ABBOTT:

No.

Item stands.

Progress reported.

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At eleven o'clock the house adjourned, without question put, pursuant to standing order. ' - ADDRESS


THE RIGHT HONOURABLE JOHN CURTIN, P.C.


Prime Minister oj Australia


MEMBERS OF THE SENATE AND OF THE HOUSE OF COMMONS IN THE HOUSE OF COMMONS CHAMBER, OTTAWA ON


Thursday, June 1, 1944 (Mr. Curtin was welcomed by Right lion. W. L. Mackenzie King, Prime Minister oj Canada, and Mr. Gordon Gray don, Leader oj the Opposition, and thanked by Hon. Thomas V%en, Speaker oj the Senate, and Hon. James Allison Glen, Speaker oj the House oj C ommons)


LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Right Hon. W. L. MACKENZIE KING (Prime Minister of Canada):

Members of the Senate and of the House of Commons: We are greatly privileged to have as a guest of our two houses to-day the Right Honourable John Curtin, the Prime Minister of Australia. Mr. Curtin has kindly consented to address us this afternoon. Before he does so I should like, on behalf of the parliament and people of Canada, to say just a word or two to him, and, through him, to the parliament and people of Australia.

It is difficult to believe that more than three years have elapsed since members here assembled had the honour of being addressed by Mr. Curtin's distinguished predecessor, the Right Honourable R. G. Menzies. At that time the war was far into its second year. Nazi Germany had subjugated most of Europe. There was desperate fighting in Egypt, in Libya, in Greece and in Crete, and on the waters of the Mediterranean. In all these theatres of war, and over Europe from Britain, Australian soldiers, sailors and airmen had been heroically withstanding the onslaughts of the enemy, often at great sacrifice.

But not in Africa and Europe only were the armed forces of Australia on active service.

3454 COMMONS

Address oj Right Hon. John Curtin

They were serving at that time in Australia itself, in Asia, at Singapore and in Malaya, some, we are proud to say, were training as brothers in arms with our own airmen here in Canada. On no less than five continents and on many seas, Australia had distributed her fighting forces to help preserve the world's liberties. All this was even before Russia had come into the war. I mention these things, that you, Mr. Curtin, may know that the recollection of the service rendered the world by Australia in those early and perilous years is as vivid in our minds to-day as it was at the time. These memories will never be effaced.

Appalling as the prospect appeared to your countrymen, as, indeed, it did to all the other peoples of the British commonwealth in those first two years of war, that prospect, to you and to the people of Australia, must have seemed almost unreal by comparison with the situation which confronted Australia within two months of the time you became leader of the government.

For years the Japanese had been waiting for the day they might proclaim themselves masters of the Pacific.. While you were denuding your own continent of its bravest men, and even of its own defences to help save freedom in Europe, Japan was extending her conquest of China. She was stealthily encroaching on other territories which brought her, in full strength, ever closer to your own shores. After Pearl Harbor, after the fall of Singapore, before aid could come to you from any quarter of the globe, you and the people of Australia must have experienced terrible anxiety. What Britain had to endure, when she stood alone facing the might of Germany, Australia for many months must have felt in facing the might of Japan. As Britain kept open the gates of freedom in the north Atlantic, so Australia and New Zealand kept open the gates of freedom in the south Pacific.

The free world will probably never realize what it owes to Australia, what it owes, Mr. Curtin, to your own sagacious and resolute leadership. We are anxious, however, at this moment to express what acknowledgment we can of so great a debt. With this acknowledgment we wish to give you the assurance that just as your forces and ours have been exerting their strength wherever the call was most imperative in this global war; just as today we await with confidence the outcome of the colossal conflict which will crush forever the menace of nazi tyranny; so on the morrow our forces will be found closer than ever at the side of yours, sharing with our allies in the total destruction of the tyranny of Japan.

Before calling upon the Prime Minister of Australia to address us, I shall ask Mr. Graydon, as leader of the opposition, to join with me in extending to Mr. Curtin a unanimous welcome, and our best of wishes for the safe return of Mrs. Curtin and himself, and the members of their party, to their homeland. We ask them to take with them to the people of Australia the profound admiration and heartfelt good wishes of all the people of Canada.

Mr. GORDON GRAYDON (Leader of the Opposition)': Mr. Speaker, I desire to associate His Majesty's Loyal Opposition and, if I may be permitted, other opposition groups in the house as well, with the eloquent and gracious words of welcome which the Prime Minister has extended to-day to our honoured and distinguished visitor. We warmly welcome the Right Honourable John Curtin as a statesman with a long, honourable and successful parliamentary career, and as a prominent member of Australia's "fourth estate". His keen concern for the welfare of the common people and his deep attachment to the cause of labour, which has made such a notable effort in this wartime period, gives to his visit a special significance to this parliament and the Canadian people.

May I express at this point, too, with what great pleasure the Canadian people extend their hospitality to Mrs. Curtin, who has through the years been such a tower of strength to her husband.

Australia's Prime Minister is just returning from an important meeting of the commonwealth Prime Ministers. This conference has given new encouragement and added determination to the British commonwealth and empire statesmen, and to the people they represent, to see this war through to a speedy and successful conclusion. Our fervent hope is that this conference marks only the beginning of even greater things ahead for a strengthened and more closely collaborating commonwealth and empire in the closing days of war and in that better world of permanent peace and plenty which must follow.

We greatly admire and honour the record of achievement in two wars of the powerful and heroic Australian forces on the sea, on the land and in the air. Their gigantic contribution to the fight for freedom, which came at one critical stage to Australia's very shores, constitutes an illustrious page in the history of this war, as in the last.

On the civilian front Australia has a magnificent record to her credit as well, and we ask Australia's Prime Minister to-day to carry back to his nation's armed forces and to his people in general the admiration and praise

Address oj Right Hon. John Curtin

of Canadians for all that Australia has meant to this dominion, the British commonwealth and the united nations in these stem days of test and trial.

So I say to you, Mr. Curtin, that it gives me great pleasure and no small satisfaction to make the words of the Prime Minister, who so eloquently welcomed you to-day, unanimous in the Dominion of Canada.

Topic:   MEMBERS OF THE SENATE AND OF THE HOUSE OF COMMONS IN THE HOUSE OF COMMONS CHAMBER, OTTAWA ON
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June 1, 1944