June 8, 1944

LIB

Norman Alexander McLarty (Secretary of State of Canada)

Liberal

Mr. McLARTY:

Return tabled.

Topic:   QUESTIONS PASSED AS ORDERS FOR RETURNS
Subtopic:   NEUROLOGICAL CENTRE, MONTREAL
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MOBILIZATION ACT-RESERVE ARMY

CCF

Mr. GILLIS:

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

1. Do the call-up regulations of the N.R.M.A. apply to all personnel of the reserve army? If not, what ranks are exempt from said call-up?

2. Of such ranks as may be exempt from said call-up, what is the total number now in the reserve army who are of military age?

3. Of the number indicated in the answer to

question (2), how many joined the reserve army, (a) prior to September 1, 1939; (b)

*between September 1, 1939, and September 1, 1940; (c) since September 1, 1940?

Topic:   QUESTIONS PASSED AS ORDERS FOR RETURNS
Subtopic:   MOBILIZATION ACT-RESERVE ARMY
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CONTINENTAL GLOVE COMPANY-AIRMEN'S GLOVES

NAT

Mr. FRASER (Peterborough West):

National Government

1. What was the amount of the original tender of the Continental Glove Company of Montreal for the lining of airmen's gloves with shorn lamb?

2. Was the same amount paid to the Continental Glove Company for the lining of the gloves with a substitute?

3. What were the names of the inspectors who made the first inspection of the linings?

4. What were the names of the inspectors who made the final inspection and passed the gloves ?

Topic:   QUESTIONS PASSED AS ORDERS FOR RETURNS
Subtopic:   CONTINENTAL GLOVE COMPANY-AIRMEN'S GLOVES
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PUBLIC RELATIONS, PRESS AND LIAISON OFFICERS

NAT

Thomas Langton Church

National Government

Mr. CHURCH:

What are the salaries, living allowances, travelling expenses and all other emoluments of the officials set out in sessional paper 320, tabled Tuesday, May 30, as follows: (a) public relation officers; (b) press agents; (c) liaison officers in civil and war work?

Topic:   PUBLIC RELATIONS, PRESS AND LIAISON OFFICERS
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CIVIL DISTURBANCES

INQUIRY AS TO CLASHES IN MONTREAL AREA BETWEEN CIVILIANS AND MEMBERS OF ARMED SERVICES


On the orders of the day:


NAT

Gordon Graydon (Leader of the Official Opposition)

National Government

Mr. GORDON GRAYDON (Leader of the Opposition):

I desire to ask a question of the Minister of Justice, and in doing so I intend no reflection against the provincial police of Quebec or the municipal police of Montreal. I should like to know whether the government has taken any steps through the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, or any other agency, to

Civil Disturbances

ensure that there will be no recurrences of the fighting which has taken place in the Montreal area between gangs of so-called "zoot-suiters" and members of the armed forces. I ask this question because of what seems to be a quickening concern on the part of people generally as to what is going on in that district.

Hon. L. S. ST. LAURENT (Minister of Justice): I do not know that I can give a direct answer to the question as put by the leader of the opposition, because I would not want to suggest that the Royal Canadian Mounted Police were concerning themselves with matters wdiich are primarily a provincial or municipal responsibility. But, noting the newspaper reports of what had been going on, the commissioner and I had the assistant commissioner proceed to Montreal, where he spent two days making a careful investigation into these instances that had been reported in the press. He returned last evening and I had a verbal report from him this morning. He is going to give me a more detailed written report, but in the meantime the provisional report with which I have been supplied states that there had been, over a period of several weeks, scattered and disconnected incidents in Westmount, Verdun, Longueuil and St. Lambert, and more recently there have been in the city of Montreal two or three street fights either between civilians or between civilians and members of the armed forces. The information obtained by Assistant Commissioner Mead was that these incidents were characterized in the newspaper reports as rather more serious than they were in fact, though it is regrettable that anything of the sort should occur.

In the provisional report it is stated that at present it is not considered that these fights are due to any racial animosities or that they have any political significance, and that view is shared by the director of the municipal police of Montreal. The situation, of course, is one that could be exploited by trouble-seeking persons, and if it were to continue it might become quite disturbing. It is suggested that one remedy which might be successful to a large extent would be in giving less exaggerated publicity to these isolated incidents, because it is noted now that people are commencing to congregate on St. Catherine street in the vicinity of St. Lawrence boulevard waiting to see if something is not going to occur, and the presence of crowds congregating there increases the occasion for unfortunate conflicts.

All I can add is that the provincial and municipal police, as well as the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, are carefully inquiring into the possible origin of these quarrels and are also conferring with the provost corps, and

that everyone is trying to avoid any occasion for incidents which up to the present time do not appear to have any other sinister' significance than simply spasmodic outbreaks between persons who are quick to take offence. The first clash between service personnel and civilians arose out of an incident when a sailor was perhaps successful in taking a young lady away from a civilian. That was resented and a fight ensued, which led to reprisals, and that appears to have been the start of clashes of this kind between civilians and uniformed personnel. I hope the efforts that are being made will be sufficiently effective to prevent any recurrence of these incidents.

Topic:   CIVIL DISTURBANCES
Subtopic:   INQUIRY AS TO CLASHES IN MONTREAL AREA BETWEEN CIVILIANS AND MEMBERS OF ARMED SERVICES
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LIB

Jean-François Pouliot

Liberal

Mr. POULIOT:

Would the leader of the opposition be kind enough to give a clear definition of a "zoot-suiter"?

Topic:   CIVIL DISTURBANCES
Subtopic:   INQUIRY AS TO CLASHES IN MONTREAL AREA BETWEEN CIVILIANS AND MEMBERS OF ARMED SERVICES
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NAT

Gordon Graydon (Leader of the Official Opposition)

National Government

Mr. GRAYDON:

I am sure it is not necessary for me to assist the hon. member for Temiscouata, who on so many occasions has demonstrated in this house a very excellent understanding of the .English language.

Topic:   CIVIL DISTURBANCES
Subtopic:   INQUIRY AS TO CLASHES IN MONTREAL AREA BETWEEN CIVILIANS AND MEMBERS OF ARMED SERVICES
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LABOUR CONDITIONS

INQUIRY AS TO PROPOSED CHANGES IN MANPOWER POLICY


On the orders of the day:


NAT

Gordon Graydon (Leader of the Official Opposition)

National Government

Mr. GORDON GRAYDON (Leader of the Opposition):

I understand the Minister of

Labour has made plans to announce, some time during to-day or this evening, over a Canadian radio network, some important and far-reaching changes in government policy with respect to man-power. I would ask the minister if he would consider announcing these details as to any change in government policy where I suggest they should be made known first, that is, in the House of Commons; and, if he is not prepared to do that, I think he ought to give some reason why this extraordinary course is being taken.

Topic:   LABOUR CONDITIONS
Subtopic:   INQUIRY AS TO PROPOSED CHANGES IN MANPOWER POLICY
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LIB

Humphrey Mitchell (Minister of Labour)

Liberal

Hon. HUMPHREY MITCHELL (Minister of Labour):

I had intended to make a brief

statement, Mr. Speaker. It is quite true that I intend to make a short address over the radio this evening, as my hon. friend has done many times, but in the course of that address there will not be an announcement of any major departure in policy. Under existing orders we have all the powers necessary.

The plan is three-fold. First, some 500,000 men who have been rejected for service in the armed forces will be interviewed individually, with a view to moving them, where necessary, to more essential employment. I might add that in order to speed up this plan arrangements have been made for selective service and employment offices throughout

Labour Conditions

Canada to stay open when necessary during, the evenings. Second, the compulsory transfer regulations now in effect are to be extended to cover a greater number of occupations and will be applied more vigorously. Third, the industrial mobilization survey plan will be extended to cover all industries, regardless of priority. The employment of all men aged sixteen to forty inclusive, in all industrial and commercial establishments, will be subject to survey. These surveys will be made as rapidly as possible. Their primary purpose is: to determine cases where men on postponement can be called for military training without interference with essential production; to arrange transfer to more essential jobs of men who are medically unfit or not callable for military service for any reason; to discover cases where an employer, in any priority, has a temporary or permanent surplus ctf men in the age groups mentioned who may be moved to essential work. In view of its peculiar labour difficulties the agricultural industry will not be included in the survey. I might add that a survey of this nature is being applied to the civil service in Ottawa.

I would stress the point that in regard to men in the age groups mentioned, whether callable for military training or not, or whether married or single, all cases will be examined most carefully. Essential and non-essential industries all will be covered. Every effort will be made to treat fairly the employers and employees involved, but the paramount importance of war production will be the deciding factor.

To explain further: the officers of the industrial mobilization survey division of selective service will investigate plants, and will report to one of twelve industrial mobilization survey committees across Canada.

Workers transferred have the right to reinstatement in former jobs, after the emergency passes. Under certain conditions, special allowances will be paid to those moved to other jobs where hardship would be involved.

Employers and employees may appeal decisions of these committees to courts of referees, which are widely distributed throughout the country and which include representatives of labour and employers.

May I add this: as we did last year, we have reached that period when labour shortages are most marked, when we are moving from one season to a busier season, a condition which is traditional in Canada. I thought I would use this opportunity in an effort to speed up recruitment, particularly of women workers in Canada, to take the place of men in various industrial and commercial undertakings across the dominion.

Topic:   LABOUR CONDITIONS
Subtopic:   INQUIRY AS TO PROPOSED CHANGES IN MANPOWER POLICY
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NAT

Gordon Graydon (Leader of the Official Opposition)

National Government

Mr. GRAYDON:

I take it that what the minister has given us to-day is substantially what he intends to give the nation on the broadcast?

Topic:   LABOUR CONDITIONS
Subtopic:   INQUIRY AS TO PROPOSED CHANGES IN MANPOWER POLICY
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LIB

Humphrey Mitchell (Minister of Labour)

Liberal

Mr. MITCHELL:

Yes, absolutely.

Topic:   LABOUR CONDITIONS
Subtopic:   INQUIRY AS TO PROPOSED CHANGES IN MANPOWER POLICY
Permalink

June 8, 1944