April 4, 1946

LIB

James Horace King (Speaker of the Senate)

Liberal

Mr. SPEAKER:

The hon. member knows

that the minister is not obliged to answer.

Topic:   AIR FORCE
Subtopic:   BUILDINGS AT FOOT OF YONGE STREET, TORONTO
Permalink

REPRESENTATION OF PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND


On the orders of the day: Mr. W. CHESTER S. McLURE (Queens): Arising out of a Canadian press dispatch in the Hamilton Spectator-


?

Some hon. MEMBERS:

Order.

Topic:   REPRESENTATION OF PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND
Permalink
PC

Winfield Chester Scott McLure

Progressive Conservative

Mr. McLURE:

May I ask the Secretary

of State this question: Is it the intention of

the Secretary of State to reduce the representation of Prince Edward Island in the House of Commons from four to two members?

Topic:   REPRESENTATION OF PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND
Permalink
LIB

James Horace King (Speaker of the Senate)

Liberal

Mr. SPEAKER:

Order. The question is

not one that should be asked on the orders of the day.

Topic:   REPRESENTATION OF PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND
Permalink

CANADIAN ARMY

INQUIRY INTO ADMINISTRATION OF FORCES IN THE NETHERLANDS


On the orders of the day:


PC

Alan Cockeram

Progressive Conservative

Mr. ALAN COCKERAM (York South):

I wish to direct a question to the Minister of National Defence: Will the minister advise the house if and when the report of the committee of inquiry, headed by Lieutenant General Price Montague, into the administration of Canadian forces in the Netherlands will be tabled?

Topic:   CANADIAN ARMY
Subtopic:   INQUIRY INTO ADMINISTRATION OF FORCES IN THE NETHERLANDS
Permalink
LIB

Douglas Charles Abbott (Minister of National Defence; Minister of National Defence for Naval Services)

Liberal

Hon. DOUGLAS ABBOTT (Minister of National Defence):

These reports are never tabled in the House of Commons and therefore this one will follow the rule.

Topic:   CANADIAN ARMY
Subtopic:   INQUIRY INTO ADMINISTRATION OF FORCES IN THE NETHERLANDS
Permalink

CANADA DAY


SUBSTITUTION OF WORD 'CANADA* FOR WORD "dominion" Mr. A. P. COTE (Matapedia-Matane) moved the second reading of bill No. 8, an act respecting Canada day. He said: In proposing the second reading of the bill I shall not venture upon any remarks which will give rise to a protracted debate. When Dominion day was established by law as a national holiday our country was, for all practical purposes, and I have reference particularly to the 49th parallel as well as the whole expanse of the ocean, regarded as a possession or as a colony or as a plantation of the British crown, at least according to some constitutional and legal authorities, Canada Day



among whicli is a unanimous judgment of the Court of King's Bench delivered by Lord Chief Justice Mansfield in 1774. But since by the statute of Westminster in 1931, which statute constituted a new charter for the nations comprising the six kingdoms, Canada has achieved a new status, from the constitutional point of view the most important event since confederation. And quoting . Dr. Maurice Ollivier in his book entitled "Problems of Canadian Sovereignty": The statute of Westminster was therefore the confirmation of the Balfour declaration at the imperial conference of 1926 to the effect that the dominions had now become "autonomous communities witiiin the British empire, equal in status, in no way subordinate one to another, in any aspect of their domestic or external affairs, though united by a common allegiance to the crown and freely associated as members of the British commonwealth of nations." Therefore the appellation which may have been considered appropriate before 1931 cannot any longer be used to designate properly either our country or the day devoted to its national holiday. Furthermore, "dominion" is surely not an identification which is proper to make Canada known in its true perspective, or in 8ny way at all either to Americans or to other peoples of the world. May I quote here my best authority, our distinguished Prime Minister: Incidentally, may I say that the time has come to cease speaking of "the dominions" as if they were some peculiar half-fledged type of community, and all alike in their interests and views. Such a usage leads to confusion at best, and to alibis and misrepresentation at worst. South Africa is South Africa, New Zealand is New Zealand, Australia is Australia and Canada is Canada'. Replacing the word "Dominion" by the word Canada, as far as our national holiday is concerned, will at least provide Canadians travelling outside of our country with * an answer when quizzed about our national holiday-that there is a Canada day and it is on July 1, and on no other day; because for so many strangers Dominion day may as well mean New Zealand day. The time has come, I firmly believe, our valiant men of the three armed forces having put Canada in the limelight all over the world during the conflict which has just ended, when the name of Canada should be kept in the ears and in the eyes of mankind, and at least of Canadians. Because, for a great many loyal new Canadians and perhaps for a greater number of our older citizens and their posterity, Dominion day means no more than an ordinary bank holiday. Surely it is not too early to try to give the idea to all Canadians that on July 1 they commemorate their national holiday in a true Canadian way, and that their citizenship is being given a significance on that day. I believe that Canada day bears out that message better than Dominion day.


PC

Thomas Langton Church

Progressive Conservative

Mr. T. L. CHURCH (Broadview):

Bill No. 8 proposes to amend a general act regarding public holidays which has been in force since confederation. In the first meeting at Charlottetown of the fathers of confederation they were unanimous in agreeing that the proposed confederation be called the "Dominion of Canada". From time immemorial we have been a dominion. We are part and parcel of the British empire. There is no reason why this bill should be introduced at this time. If the bill passes, all the history books will have to be changed. Moreover the bill is ultra vires of this parliament, because the original provinces came into confederation on a definite bargain. Speaking at Kingston in 1844, Sir John A. Macdonald said that it has always been the policy of Canada that as a dominion we are part and parcel of the British empire. Long may it continue. Had it not been for that fact we would have had the awful horror of war on our own soil. As I pointed out the other night, not only in Ontario but in Quebec and the maritime provinces we owe it to confederation that that did not happen.

I see no reason for this bill at this session of parliament. There are many bills being proposed with regard to a change in status, autonomy and sovereignty. A large body of public opinion in this country is very much alarmed at what this parliament is doing in that regard. I believe a large body of public opinion in all the provinces is against this bill. We have good history books in Quebec and in all the provinces. Confederation was brought about with the cooperation of the French people of Canada.. Sir John A. Macdonald, Cartier and all the others, Liberals and Conservatives alike, made confederation possible. We have got on very well together. Like Your Honour, I have always believed in confederation and the doctrine of the old Cornish battle cry, "Each for all and all for each". What is good for one province is good for all.

The words "Dominion of Canada" were wisely selected after a great deal of consultation and thought. While we are part and parcel of the British Empire the ties are invisible under our status of autonomy and sovereignty. A million men went from the dominion in the first great war. One hundred and thirty thousand died on the field of battle. We shall always remember France, where several thousand of my own citizens

Canada Day

are buried until the resurrection morning. I plead with hon. members from Quebec to pay-tribute where tribute is due-to Britain for saving our shores from invasion. I see no reason why we should bring up such matters as this at the present time. There are more important economic matters to be decided by this parliament so that a lead can be given to the health, peace and prosperity of all our citizens. We are wasting our time on a lot of secondary matters for political purposes that could very properly be left over until the more important matters affecting the poorer classes of citizens in all the provinces, namely, housing, health matters, fuel, clothing, food, employment, and so on, have been dealt with.

I am prepared to move in amendment, seconded by the hon. member for St. Paul's (Mr. Ross), that the bill be not now read a second time but that it be read this day six months hence.

Topic:   CANADA DAY
Permalink
LIB

James Horace King (Speaker of the Senate)

Liberal

Mr. SPEAKER:

Mr. Church moves,

seconded by Mr. Ross (St. Paul's):

That bill No. 8, respecting Canada day, be not now read a second time but this day six months hence.

Is it the pleasure of the house to adopt the motion?

Topic:   CANADA DAY
Permalink
?

Some hon. MEMBERS:

No.

Topic:   CANADA DAY
Permalink
PC

Douglas Gooderham Ross

Progressive Conservative

Mr. D. G. ROSS (St. Paul's):

I wish to support the amendment moved by the hon. member for Broadview (Mr. Church). At the present time I see no reason why we should repeal the Dominion Day Act. We are the Dominion of Canada, and Dominion day signifies something; it signifies the bringing together of all the provinces of Canada in one great country, the Dominion of Canada.

Topic:   CANADA DAY
Permalink
CCF

William Irvine

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. IRVINE:

I rise to a point of order, Mr. Speaker. I understood Your Honour had put the motion and that it was voted down.

Topic:   CANADA DAY
Permalink
?

Some hon. MEMBERS:

No, no.

Topic:   CANADA DAY
Permalink

April 4, 1946