July 9, 1946

?

Some hon. MEMBERS:

Agreed.

Topic:   THE BUDGET
Subtopic:   DEBATE ON THE ANNUAL FINANCIAL STATEMENT OF THE MINISTER OF FINANCE
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IND

Herbert Wilfred Herridge

Independent C.C.F.

Mr. HERRIDGE:

The brief follows:

The Rossland Junior Board of Trade Rossland, B.C.

The Victory Highway

Object

It is the purpose of this brief to submit preliminary information on a proposed alternative route for the new southern British Columbia trans-provincial highway between the city of Rossland and the city of Grand Porks. It is emphasized that the proposed project is intended as a post-war undertaking.

Present Route

The present highway-locally known as the Cascade highway-is a poor class gravel road at best. In the course of some 40 miles between Rossland and Christina lake-along north slopes practically all the way-it first rises to an elevation of 4,600 feet (Rossland summit), thence drops by a series of treacherous switchbacks to a valley floor, elevation 2,200 feet (Sheep creek), thence climbs .a second summit to 5,000 feet elevation (Cascade summit), dropping again to the level of Christina lake, elevation 1,400 feet. Sixty per cent of the above highway is over 3,400 feet elevation, and snow conditions are such that keeping it open all winter is both costly and difficult, if not impossible. It is our contention that it would be an extremely costly undertaking to make this a first class route, and the snow clearance problems would still remain. Alternative Routes

There exists between Rossland and Christina lake two north-south mountain ranges both extending from the international boundary to the Lower Arrow lake. The easterly range is over 5,000 feet in elevation except for two passes, the one at elevation 4,200 feet near Sheep lake, the other near the international boundary with an elevation of 4.600. feet and occupied by the present Cascade highway. Likewise, except for one 4,000-foot pass at Faron, the westerly range is over 5.000 feet elevation.

In addition to the present route, and the one which forms the subject of this brief, the following other routes have been proposed:

(a) Faron Route

This would involve costly rock work on the north shore of Lower Arrow lake, a ferry across that lake, and a narrow and precipitous 4,000-foot summit between Lower Arrow lake and Christina lake. This road would pass through relatively uninhabited country, by-passing both Trail and Rossland.

(b) Blueberry Creek Route

This route -would traverse over 50 miles of entirely uninhabited country, cross over a 5,000-foot summit, and likewise by-pass both Trail and Rossland.

The Victory Highway

The salient feature of this route is that the two mountain ranges previously mentioned both taper off 5 to 6 miles south of the international boundary to elevations of 2,200 and 3,200 feet respectively.

The proposed route-mostly on southern slopes -would follow the present highway from Rossland to Patterson, from whence it would bear west following approximately the course of an existing United States road, for a distance of roughly 25 miles, thence reentering Canada at Laurier.

Construction would be mostly bull-dozer work, the only rock work being a half-mile stretch at the headwaters of Deep creek in Box canyon, a dry canyon.

The average maximum depth of snow along the whole route occurs at Rossland, B.C., where it averages 3 feet yearly. Elsewhere the average is between 1 and 2 feet. Under these conditions, winter maintenance should be relatively easy.

The over-all distance between Rossland and Grand Forks would be about 35 miles, a reduction of from 6' to 10 miles over the present cascade highway. Faster travelling time would be

ossible along the proposed highway, the grades

eing less extreme.

The Budget-Mr. Herridge

Benefits

The proposed Victory highway route would:

(a) Facilitate the movement of agricultural produce to and from the prairies, Grand Forks district, Okanagan, and coast points.

(b) Stimulate tourist traffic in this district. At the present time travel through this district is severely curtailed due to the fear of traversing the treacherous Cascade highway.

(c) Provide year-round bus and freight traffic service between the Kootenay and Grand Forks district, and a highly important link in the southern B.C. trans-provincial highway. International Aspects

During the winter months the only road link between Rossland and Grand Forks is by a roundabout route through the United States, the Cascade highway being closed due to heavy snow conditions; freight carriers are compelled to travel under bond and seal.

The following means of overcoming international complications that would arise in connection with building the proposed highway are suggested:

(a) That an area extending approximately from Patterson to Danville and from 5 to 6 miles each side of the boundary, be set aside as an international memorial park, and that travel within this area be as free as possible of customs and immigration formalities.

(b) That the Canadian government either lease, or purchase from the United States, a strip of land 300 feet wide. Most of the land is in a forest reserve in which there are few settlers.

Conclusions

The present road link (Cascade highway) between the Trail-Rossland district and the Grand Forks area is inadequate, and it would be extremely expensive to make it a first-class highway. Alternate routes through Canada are not attractive.

We leel that a first-class road link between the above-mentioned areas is vital to the continued prosperity of southeastern B.C., and suggest the Victory highway project be given very serious consideration.

Submitted by:

The Rossland Junior Board of Trade Endorsed by:

The Rossland Board of Trade (Senior)

The Trail Board of Trade

The Trail Junior Chamber of Commerce

I brought up this matter in the provincial legislature, and the Premier of British Columbia stated that it would be brought to the attention of the proper authorities in Ottawa. Some time ago the Rossland junior board of trade and other organizations wrote to the premier of British Columbia, and he replied to the effect that the matter was being taken jp with Ottawa and that they were waiting to aear from the east. Then I wrote the Department of External Affairs, but nobody there knew anything about it. Then I asked for the production of all papers and correspondence between the government of British Columbia or any official of the government of British Columbia and the government of the Dominion of Canada or any official of the dominion government, but again I was told that no one

knows anything about it. So that I do not know what has happened to date, and I should certainly like to know what is being done in connection with these proposals for this new diversion into United States territory.

I see, Mr. Speaker, that my time is slipping away very quickly. I am not going on at greater length, except to again emphasize my belief-and it is not my belief only but that of many other people in this country-that the budget should have contained evidences of the government's approach to the reconstruction period, that it should have provided for a programme of public investment for the future, for a housing erection project, for doing away with level crossings, and for a great development of the trans-Canada highway system. I trust that, while this government has not seen fit at this time to give effect to these proposals, when the next budget comes before this house we shall see that the government has reacted favourably to these proposals and is doing the things which I know all of us realize the Canadian people wish to see it do.

Topic:   THE BUDGET
Subtopic:   DEBATE ON THE ANNUAL FINANCIAL STATEMENT OF THE MINISTER OF FINANCE
Permalink
?

Some hon. MEMBERS:

Question.

Topic:   THE BUDGET
Subtopic:   DEBATE ON THE ANNUAL FINANCIAL STATEMENT OF THE MINISTER OF FINANCE
Permalink
CCF

Thomas John Bentley

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. BENTLEY:

Mr. Speaker-

Topic:   THE BUDGET
Subtopic:   DEBATE ON THE ANNUAL FINANCIAL STATEMENT OF THE MINISTER OF FINANCE
Permalink
?

Some hon. MEMBERS:

Eleven o'clock.

Topic:   THE BUDGET
Subtopic:   DEBATE ON THE ANNUAL FINANCIAL STATEMENT OF THE MINISTER OF FINANCE
Permalink
PC

James Arthur Ross

Progressive Conservative

Mr. ROSS (Souris):

Mr. Speaker, may I call it eleven o'clock?

Topic:   THE BUDGET
Subtopic:   DEBATE ON THE ANNUAL FINANCIAL STATEMENT OF THE MINISTER OF FINANCE
Permalink
CCF

Thomas John Bentley

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. BENTLEY:

May I move the adjournment of this debate?

On motion of Mr. Ross (Souris) the debate was adjourned.

Topic:   THE BUDGET
Subtopic:   DEBATE ON THE ANNUAL FINANCIAL STATEMENT OF THE MINISTER OF FINANCE
Permalink
LIB

James Horace King (Speaker of the Senate)

Liberal

Mr. SPEAKER:

Before adjourning the

house, it is my duty to call the attention of hon. members to Beauchesne's Parliamentary Rules and Forms, third edition, page 102, article 239, in which they may read:

Besides the prohibitions contained in this standing order, it has been sanctioned by usage both in England and in Canada, that a member, while speaking, must not:

(o) read from a written, previously prepared speech.

Many times since the beginning of this session I thought I should call the attention of hon. members to this rule; but I hesitated to do so. However, I feel that it is my duty now, particularly to-night, to draw the attention of hon. members on both sides of the house to this rule, and to tell them that I feel I should call to order in future members whenever they read their speeches.

Topic:   THE BUDGET
Subtopic:   DEBATE ON THE ANNUAL FINANCIAL STATEMENT OF THE MINISTER OF FINANCE
Permalink

At eleven o'clock the house adjourned, without question put, pursuant to standing order. Private Bills Wednesday, July 10, 1946.


July 9, 1946