April 28, 1947

VOCATIONAL SCHOOLS ASSISTANCE AGREEMENTS

CCF

Mr. PROBE:

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

1. What total sums of money have been allotted by the federal government by provinces for capital expenditures under the vocational schools assistance agreements, authorized by the terms of P.C. 1648 of March 8. 1945?

2. What sums were spent by provinces as federal grants under the terms of these agreements in each of the fiscal years 1945-46 and 1946-47?

3. Have representations been made that expenditures during the final year of the agreements be deferred until the building emergency for family housing has been met or become less acute? If so, from what provinces?

4. What action has the Minister of Labour taken or alternatively what action does he propose to take to meet the requests for deferment of capital expenditures under this agreement without loss of federal assistance?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   VOCATIONAL SCHOOLS ASSISTANCE AGREEMENTS
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LIB

Mr. MITCHELL: (Minister of Labour)

Liberal

1. Under the provisions of order in council P.C. 1648 of March 8, 1945, agreements were entered into by the dominion with all provinces for financial assistance by the dominion for vocational training at secondary school level, including provisions for a grant towards capital expenditures made by the provinces between April 1, 1945, and March 31, 1948, for buildings and equipment, equal in amount to that subscribed by the provinces, up to a maximum of $19,000,000.

2. Total amounts contributed by the dominion to the provinces pursuant to the

agreements entered into under P.C. 1648 by years covering operational costs and capital expenditures are as follows:

Prince Edward 1945-46 1946-47Island . ..$ 50,300 00 $ 45,000 06Nova Scotia ... 32.324 71 28,024 37New Brunswick ... ... 81.598 35 71,035 99Quebec 461,498 47Ontario 589,000 00Manitoba Saskatchewan .... . -. 64,460 00 31,513 71Alberta ... 100,003 21 132,974 76British Columbia . ... 80,356 85 10,000 003. Representations have been made that the period for dominion contribution towards special capital expenditures should be extended beyond the present date of March 31, 1948, by British Columbia, Alberta, Saskatchewan, Quebec and New Brunswick.4. No action has been taken on such requests. The matters involved in the requests are matters of future government policy on which no decision has yet been made.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   VOCATIONAL SCHOOLS ASSISTANCE AGREEMENTS
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INTEREST ON OVERDUE TAXES

PC

Mr. DIEFENBAKER:

Progressive Conservative

1. What rate of interest is being charged on overdue (a) excess profit tax; (b) personal income tax, for each of the years 1940 to 1945?

2. Is interest compounded? If so, at what intervals?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   INTEREST ON OVERDUE TAXES
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LIB

Mr. McCANN: (Minister of National Revenue; Minister of National War Services)

Liberal

1. The following interest rates apply both (o excess profits tax and personal income tax for the years 1940 to 1945.

1940 to 1943

Five per cent interest on (a) balance of tax estimated by the taxpayer from the due dates to the date of payment; (b) additional tax assessed from date of filing the return to date of payment.

Three per cent additional interest on (a) instalments in default from due dates to date of payment; (d) additional tax assessed remaining unpaid one month after issuance of the notice of assessment to date of payment.

Note: The 3 per cent additional interest on instalments in default does not apply to personal income tax or personal excess profits tax in 1942 and 1943, and to corporations in 1943.

1944 and 1945

Four per cent interest on (a) balance of tax estimated by the taxpayer from the due dates to the date of payment; (b) additional tax assessed from date of filing the return to date of payment.

Questions

Three per cent additional interest on tax unpaid one month after issuance of notice of assessment to date of payment.

Note: No interest is payable upon unpaid taxes for a period beginning twenty months after the date of filing a return and ending one month from the date of issuing the notice of assessment with respect to taxes of the year 1945.

2. Interest is not compounded.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   INTEREST ON OVERDUE TAXES
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WARTIME PRICES AND TRADE BOARD-PERSONNEL

IND

Mr. DORION:

Independent

1. What are the names and the addresses of the following personnel of the wartime prices and trade board (a) chairman; (b) deputy chairman; (c) members of the board; (d) administrators of the board; (e) deputy administrators of the board; (fj coordinators of the board; (g) deputy coordinators of the board; (h) persons to whom the board has delegated some powers?

2. In what capacity are they acting?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   WARTIME PRICES AND TRADE BOARD-PERSONNEL
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IND

Mr. DORION:

Independent

1. How many persons are employed in the wartime prices and trade board?

2. How many of such employees are of (a) Canadian; (b) British; (e) German; (d) French; (e) Russian; (f) American, origin?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   WARTIME PRICES AND TRADE BOARD-PERSONNEL
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LIB

Robert Wellington Mayhew (Parliamentary Assistant to the Minister of Finance)

Liberal

Mr. MAYHEW:

Mr. Speaker, I have discussed these questions with the hon. member for Charlevoix-Saguenay (Mr. Dorion) and in view of the difficulty and cost and time involved in answering these questions he has agreed to drop them on the understanding that he will place a further question on the order paper which will give him the information required.

Questions dropped.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   WARTIME PRICES AND TRADE BOARD-PERSONNEL
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FLOODS AND STORMS IN GREAT BRITAIN- FOOD PARCELS

PC

Mr. CHURCH:

Progressive Conservative

1. What aid, if any, has been given towards alleviating the food shortage and famine in Great Britain caused by recent floods and storms, and to the economic strain brought about by the recent -war?

2. As large numbers of municipalities and private community organizations are sending parcels of food as well as provincial and municipal governments, could not these parcels be forwarded by the government free of charge for delivery there, and the sum total charged up to lend lease?

3. What is the rate charged per ton delivery for food parcels if based on average cost of pound parcel charges?

Mr. ST. LAURENT:

1. The need for special help from overseas to alleviate shortages caused by the recent floods and storms in the British isles, is a matter which the Lbiited Kingdom government

will wish to consider itself. Up to the present time the Canadian government has no information which would indicate that the United Kingdom is contemplating any request for such help. For the purpose of alleviating economic strain brought about by the recent war, the Canadian government in 1946 extended a credit of one and one-quarter billion dollars to the United Kingdom. In addition, the long term contracts entered into by the United Kingdom and Canadian governments will do much to facilitate the import of foodstuffs into the United Kingdom.

2. The advisability of charging the cost of privately dispatched relief parcels against the Canadian dollar credit is a matter for the United Kingdom government itself to decide.

3. The postage charges on parcels to the United Kingdom are made up of three separate arrangements: (a) Charges for conveyance in Canada which are paid at so much per pound ; (b) Charges of the shipping companies for conveyance at sea, which are paid on the basis of cubic space occupied; (c) Charges of the general post office in the United Kingdom, which are paid at so much per pound.

Parcel post shipments are not calculated on a bulk basis, and no comparison is possible.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   FLOODS AND STORMS IN GREAT BRITAIN- FOOD PARCELS
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JOHN GRIERSON

PC

Mr. FULTON:

Progressive Conservative

1. Has Mr. John Grierson asked the government or any member or department thereof, for help in obtaining a visa to enter the United States? .

2. Has any decision been made with regard to such request? If so, what was the decision?

3 Was Mr. Grierson's appointment as adviser to the director-general of UNESCO recommended by or on behalf of the Canadian government, or by or on behalf of any member, department or official thereof?

4. Was his appointment subsequently approved

by or on behalf of the Canadian government, or by or on behalf of any member, department or official thereof? .

5. Did the United States delegation m UNESCO make any representations against this appointment either before or after it was cm-cially approved by UNESCO?

Mr. ST. LAURENT:

1. No.

2. Answered by No. 1.

3. No.

4. No.

5. No information is available.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   JOHN GRIERSON
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IMMIGRATION-POLISH SOLDIERS

PC

Mr. CHURCH:

Progressive Conservative

1. Does the British government provide shipping space as well as fares for another hatch of Polish soldiers for whom a team has already gone over?

Questions

2. Did any of these soldiers fight against Britain in the last war and where?

3. What branch of the Polish army did they belong to, and did any of them fight with Germany in the last war on the western or Italian front?

4. Wliat check is there by Canada of these soldiers and what is the nature of the agreement with Britain to accept them, and to what number, and on what terms, and to what provinces will this contingent be assigned and for what work?

Mr. ST. LAURENT:

1. Yes.

2. Some of them were conscripted into the German army and fought on the Italian front and in north west Europe.

3. They belonged to those formations of the Polish army serving under British command. The question whether any of them fought with Germany on the western or Italian front is answered by Nos. 2 and 4.

4. Selection is made by a team of Canadian government officials composed of representatives of the Departments of Agriculture and Labour and the R.C.M.P.

The Canadian overseas medical immigration service provides the necessary doctors to carry out the medical examinations. Only those are accepted who are medically fit, took part in active hostilities against the axis powers and also qualify under the terms of the agreement with the United Kingdom. Those who participated voluntarily in hostilities on the side of the axis, or who have criminal records, are rejected.

The agreement with the United Kingdom provides that Canada will permit entry into this country of 4,000 Polish veterans who served with the allied forces engaged in hostilities against the axis powers, who are single and who are qualified for and willing to undertake agricultural employment in Canada. The United Kingdom has agreed that the Canadian government will make the selection of those who have applied and an undertaking will be signed by the successful applicant by which he agrees to accept farm labour at current wage rates and in accordance with living and working conditions prevailing in the locality of his employment, and will continue in agricultural employment for a period of two years. There is provision in the agreements for the return to the United Kingdom within two years of any individual who might be found to be unsuitable.

Further details are contained in the statement made to the house on this topic by the Secretary of State for External Affairs on July 25, 1946, and reported in Hansard pages 3836 and 3838 and in order in council P.C. 3112 of July 23, 1946, which was tabled at the same time.

fMr. Church.]

The second contingent of approximately 1,124 Polish veterans has tentatively been assigned as follows: Maritime provinces, 50; Quebec, 100; Ontario, 374; Manitoba, 200; Saskatchewan, 100; Alberta, 300.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   IMMIGRATION-POLISH SOLDIERS
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IMMIGRATION-DISABLED PERSONS

LIB

Howard Waldemar Winkler

Liberal

Mr. WINKLER:

Is consideration being given by the government to cases where entire families are desirous of migrating to Canada, and where due to war injury one member of the family is not physically fit to qualify for admission to Canada and to make provisions that when guarantees or bonds are furnished in Canada that such disabled person will never become a public charge, then such disabled person may proceed to Canada with other members of his family?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   IMMIGRATION-DISABLED PERSONS
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LIB

James Allison Glen (Minister of Mines and Resources)

Liberal

Mr. GLEN:

Cases as described are dealt with in accordance with provisions of the Immigration Act. Section 3 thereof provides as follows:

3. No immigrant, passenger, or other person, unless he is a Canadian citizen, or has Canadian domicile, shall be permitted to enter or land in Canada, or in case of having landed in or entered Canada shall be permitted to remain therein who belongs to any of the following classes, hereinafter called "prohibited classes":-

(a)

(b)

(c) Immigrants who are dumb, blind, or otherwise physically defective, unless in the opinion of a Board of Inquiry or officer acting as such they have sufficient money, or have such profession, occupation, trade, employment or other legitimate mode of earning a living that they are not liable to become a public charge or unless they belong to a family accompanying them or already in Canada and which gives security satisfactory to the minister against such immigrants becoming a public charge.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   IMMIGRATION-DISABLED PERSONS
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NATIONAL HOUSING ACT-ASSISTANCE TO LOW-RENTAL HOUSING PROJECTS

April 28, 1947