May 11, 1948

CCF

Clarence Gillis

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. GILLIS:

I was paired with the Minister of National Health and Welfare (Mr. Martin). Had I voted I would have voted against the motion.

Topic:   194S
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PC

Clayton Wesley Hodgson

Progressive Conservative

Mr. HODGSON:

I was paired with the hon. member for York North (Mr. Smith). Had I voted I would have voted against the motion.

Topic:   194S
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PC

Heber Harold Hatfield

Progressive Conservative

Mr. HATFIELD:

I was paired with the hon. member for Three Rivers (Mr. Gariepy). Had I voted I would have voted against the motion.

Topic:   194S
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PC

Alan Cockeram

Progressive Conservative

Mr. COCKERAM:

I was paired with the Minister of Labour (Mr. Mitchell). Had I voted I would have voted against the motion.

Topic:   194S
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EXTERNAL AFFAIRS


On the orders of the day:


PC

John Bracken (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Progressive Conservative

Mr. JOHN BRACKEN (Leader of the Opposition):

Mr. Speaker, I wish to ask a question of the Secretary of State for External Affairs. It arises out of a report in the press and over the radio that conversations between the United States and the Soviet union may begin for a general settlement of outstanding differences. As this is a development of the highest importance in which Canada is directly and vitally affected, will the Secretary of State for External Affairs say (1) whether Canada

has been consulted or informed of the suggested United States action; and (2) whether he is in a position to throw any further light on the proposal than the press and the radio have given?

Right Hon. L. S. ST. LAURENT (Secretary of State for External Affairs): Mr. Speaker, the short answer to the first question is no. As to the second question, I am not in a position to say what has appeared in the press or over the radio in this country. I have had no communication from any official source, but I have had the benefit of seeing dispatches from press correspondents, and the tone of those dispatches I think explains why it is that so far no official communication has come to us. Thus, the United States ambassador, Walter Bedell Smith, said, according to the dispatches, that the Russian publication of his talks with the Soviet foreign minister Molotov was a surprise to him because the talks were confidential. He is quoted as having said:

Release of the notes by Moscow rather surprises me, as this is the first time they have done such a thing with a confidential exchange.

My understanding is that the Moscow radio has given out what is supposed to be almost the complete text of the conversations or notes between the United States ambassador and the UB.S.R. foreign minister, and the dispatches of the press correspondents which I have seen report a very interesting situation. I would not care to go beyond what is reported to have been said by someone speaking on behalf of the foreign office in London. The quotation is as follows:

We were not consulted. The announcement was a complete surprise to us, but whether it is a pleasant surprise we cannot say until we have seen the full official text of the American and Soviet notes.

It is apparent from these dispatches there has been a slight misunderstanding over what was to be published about these conversations at this time. They are reported to have taken place just about a week ago. The subject matter is of great interest, and I hope that we1 shall in due course receive official information. As soon as I get any official information which may be of interest to hon. members I shall hasten to bring it before the house.

Topic:   194S
Subtopic:   EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
Sub-subtopic:   PRESS AND RADIO REPORTS AS TO CONVERSATIONS BETWEEN UNITED STATES AND SOVIET UNION
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On the orders of the day: Mr. JOHN T. HACKETT (Stanstead): I should like to direct a question to the Secretary of State for External Affairs. Before asking the question I wished to read in Hansard the answer Inquiries oj the Ministry



that he gave yesterday to my query concerning the instructions of the Secretary of State of the United States to the consul general at Toronto who appeared before a court in that city and declined either to be sworn or to be cross-examined. I join with the minister in saying that I do not wish to make an incident out of this event, but I think it well that there should be a clear understanding that the practice indulged in by the Secretary of State is a departure from diplomatic practice. I ask the minister if he considers there has been a departure from the diplomatic observances heretofore followed by the United States and Canada. Right Hon. L. S. ST. LAURENT (Secretary of State for External Affairs): Mr. Speaker, I could not say that I would regard it as a departure from diplomatic practice. It is something which is done from time to time, jind which, I understand, in this case came out <of the fact that public notice had been given calling for representations, and that upon that notice being published the consul communicated with the Department of State and was authorized to appear and make a statement, if tile court chose to receive it. It is not unique. Under the circumstances I deplore that the appearance had been made, because it was a matter that had already been under discussion for years between the state department and the Department of External Affairs. It having been a matter under discussion between the two departments, though there was an application to a provincial administrative body by a United States citizen for a licence, it seemed to me that it would have been preferable if the applicants had been left to rely on the general knowledge that it was a matter in which the government of the United States had for a long time expressed interest. It did not seem to us that it was necessary to have it brought before the board in that form at that time, and that bringing it before the board in that form at that time might further embitter a matter which was known to be controversial.


PRIVILEGE

REFERENCE TO REPORT IN OTTAWA &quot;JOURNAL&quot; OF ADDRESS OF DR. OLLIVIER


On the orders of the day:


PC

Arthur Leroy Smith

Progressive Conservative

Mr. A. L. SMITH (Calgary West):

Mr. Speaker, I rise to a question of privilege. In the Ottawa Journal of the day before yesterday a speech was reported by Doctor Maurice Ollivier, K.C., who according to the dispatch is an employee of this House of Commons. He stated humorously, so the dispatch says, that the M.P.'s should be told that their speeches should be made while standing on

one leg, and that the minute they put the other foot to the ground their speech would be automatically at an end.

I am one of those who perhaps have no sense of humour. In any event I have a little difficulty in understanding even humorous criticism of that kind of this House of Commons by one of its servants. Perhaps we might reply that many civil servants whom I know would get through infinitely more work if they did it all standing on their heads.

Topic:   PRIVILEGE
Subtopic:   REFERENCE TO REPORT IN OTTAWA &quot;JOURNAL&quot; OF ADDRESS OF DR. OLLIVIER
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IMMIGRATION

GERMAN NATIONALS-INQUIRY AS TO PERMISSION TO ENTER CANADA


On the orders of the day:


CCF

Wilbert Ross Thatcher

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. W. ROSS THATCHER (Moose Jaw):

Mr. Speaker, I would like to direct a question to the Acting Minister of Mines and Resources. Has the government given any recent consideration to relaxing the immigration laws in order to let into this country German nationals who have relatives in Canada? I have been asked by a number of my constituents to ask that question.

Topic:   IMMIGRATION
Subtopic:   GERMAN NATIONALS-INQUIRY AS TO PERMISSION TO ENTER CANADA
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LIB

James Angus MacKinnon (Minister of Fisheries)

Liberal

Hon. J. A. MacKINNON (Acting Minister of Mines and Resources):

German nationals are not allowed to enter Canada.

Topic:   IMMIGRATION
Subtopic:   GERMAN NATIONALS-INQUIRY AS TO PERMISSION TO ENTER CANADA
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CCF

Wilbert Ross Thatcher

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. THATCHER:

I know that is the policy, but is any consideration being given to changing that policy in the future, as has been done in England?

Topic:   IMMIGRATION
Subtopic:   GERMAN NATIONALS-INQUIRY AS TO PERMISSION TO ENTER CANADA
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LIB

James Angus MacKinnon (Minister of Fisheries)

Liberal

Mr. MacKINNON:

I do not know just what, the hon. member might mean by consideration. Such matters are discussed by the minister and the department at various times, but no consideration is being given to this matter that might lead to an early decision on policy.

Topic:   IMMIGRATION
Subtopic:   GERMAN NATIONALS-INQUIRY AS TO PERMISSION TO ENTER CANADA
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May 11, 1948