February 23, 1949

?

An hon. Member:

Oh, oh.

The Address-Mr. Rowe Mr. Rowe: The hon. member may laugh, but the laugh was the other way; and he who laughs last laughs best. I have seen this country divided and I have seen the olive branch of unity tossed hither and yon. But now at last we find that we have a common purpose in this country, and that no longer can there be raised those issues that should not be raised. If anyone here doubts me when I say that we must restore enterprise, safeguard our individual freedom and revive the national character, in view of the fact that we are one of the last outposts in the world, may I say that I know there are those to your right, Mr. Speaker, who believe the same thing. I will quote only some of the statements that have been made. The Hon. Angus L. Macdonald said:

. . . the present government has no life-lease on power: that the war psychology should be over; that unelected bureaucracy should no longer govern Canada; that provincial rights should be restored; that we should have nine happy provinces, instead of nine different countries.

Then that congenial, lovable character who has represented Quebec South for so many years and who is an ex-minister of the crown, the Hon. C. G. Power, said this:

Ministers of the crown must abandon the practice of abdicating their functions, their duties, and shouldering their responsibilities on the shoulders of those irresponsible boards, committees and commissions.

It is because we have departed from that doctrine that a large part of the unrest in our ranks has developed. Without the existence of an almost allpowerful bureaucracy it is unlikely we would have had budget by radio, restraint of trade by embargoes and prohibitions, bungling of freight rates, and a snarling of interprovincial affairs.

Of his party he said:

. . . they should be provincial-righters instead of dominion centralizers.

He did not say that they were, but he said that they should be. Then he went on to say also:

Our party has gone down to defeat in three provinces. This should be testimony enough without further comment.

The further comment, I would say, is in the loss since that time of three ridings in which that type of party muddling has gone down to defeat.

I wish to thank the house for the courtesy extended to me. Before it is too late, Mr. Speaker, I hope the party to your right will return to the ways they intended to take; because even in opposition in the future they will be better off if they act in such a way as to be truer to their former selves.

On motion of Mr. Matthews (Kootenay East) the debate was adjourned.

Topic:   PROCEDURE IN QUESTIONS ON THE ORDERS OF THE DAY
Subtopic:   SPEECH FROM THE THRONE
Sub-subtopic:   CONTINUATION OF DEBATE ON ADDRESS IN REPLY
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BUSINESS OF THE HOUSE

LIB

Alphonse Fournier (Minister of Public Works; Leader of the Government in the House of Commons; Liberal Party House Leader)

Liberal

Mr. Fournier (Hull):

Tomorrow we shall continue this debate.

Topic:   BUSINESS OF THE HOUSE
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At six o'clock the house adjourned, without question put, pursuant to standing order.



Thursday, February 24, 1949


February 23, 1949