February 28, 1950

LIB

Douglas Charles Abbott (Minister of Finance and Receiver General)

Liberal

Mr. Abbott:

We are still selling potatoes, coarse grain and beef.

Topic:   TRADE CONDITIONS
Subtopic:   PROPOSED COMMONWEALTH
Sub-subtopic:   CONFERENCE
Permalink
PC

William Earl Rowe

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Rowe:

That must be a grand market in which you are selling potatoes, when in that market potatoes are selling for one cent a hundredweight. The minister says sure, that is all right.

Topic:   TRADE CONDITIONS
Subtopic:   PROPOSED COMMONWEALTH
Sub-subtopic:   CONFERENCE
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LIB

Douglas Charles Abbott (Minister of Finance and Receiver General)

Liberal

Mr. Abbott:

We are selling them.

Topic:   TRADE CONDITIONS
Subtopic:   PROPOSED COMMONWEALTH
Sub-subtopic:   CONFERENCE
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LIB

John Sylvester Aloysius Sinnott

Liberal

Mr. Sinnott:

That is not our worry.

Topic:   TRADE CONDITIONS
Subtopic:   PROPOSED COMMONWEALTH
Sub-subtopic:   CONFERENCE
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PC

William Earl Rowe

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Rowe:

There you are, Mr. Speaker. Sufficient unto the day is the evil thereof. They do not care what is happening to them.

Topic:   TRADE CONDITIONS
Subtopic:   PROPOSED COMMONWEALTH
Sub-subtopic:   CONFERENCE
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LIB

John Sylvester Aloysius Sinnott

Liberal

Mr. Sinnott:

That is not our worry.

Topic:   TRADE CONDITIONS
Subtopic:   PROPOSED COMMONWEALTH
Sub-subtopic:   CONFERENCE
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PC

William Earl Rowe

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Rowe:

The hon. member does not seem to worry much about anything in this regard. I should not say that, because I see he is busy writing a letter and did not hear what was being said. Surely, Mr. Speaker, there is no one within the sound of my voice who will say it is not our worry. What would the minister say, as a capable lawyer and a good businessman, and as Minister of Finance? Would he say that it would be wise to sell our products, and hope for a long time sale of them, to somebody who had more of similar products than he knew what to do with?

Topic:   TRADE CONDITIONS
Subtopic:   PROPOSED COMMONWEALTH
Sub-subtopic:   CONFERENCE
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LIB

Douglas Charles Abbott (Minister of Finance and Receiver General)

Liberal

Mr. Abbott:

I believe in selling our products where we can sell them and getting paid for them.

Topic:   TRADE CONDITIONS
Subtopic:   PROPOSED COMMONWEALTH
Sub-subtopic:   CONFERENCE
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PC

William Earl Rowe

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Rowe:

That is exactly what I am trying to say about the market that we have had. The market to which we have sold the most of our agricultural products in the last three-quarters of a century is the United Kingdom. There is no question about that.

Topic:   TRADE CONDITIONS
Subtopic:   PROPOSED COMMONWEALTH
Sub-subtopic:   CONFERENCE
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LIB

Douglas Charles Abbott (Minister of Finance and Receiver General)

Liberal

Mr. Abbott:

We have never sold potatoes in that market.

Topic:   TRADE CONDITIONS
Subtopic:   PROPOSED COMMONWEALTH
Sub-subtopic:   CONFERENCE
Permalink
PC

William Earl Rowe

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Rowe:

I am not going to be disturbed about whether we sell potatoes or not.

Topic:   TRADE CONDITIONS
Subtopic:   PROPOSED COMMONWEALTH
Sub-subtopic:   CONFERENCE
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LIB

Douglas Charles Abbott (Minister of Finance and Receiver General)

Liberal

Mr. Abbott:

Page the hon. member for Victoria-Carleton (Mr. Hatfield).

Topic:   TRADE CONDITIONS
Subtopic:   PROPOSED COMMONWEALTH
Sub-subtopic:   CONFERENCE
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PC

William Earl Rowe

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Rowe:

I never grew many potatoes-

Topic:   TRADE CONDITIONS
Subtopic:   PROPOSED COMMONWEALTH
Sub-subtopic:   CONFERENCE
Permalink
?

Some hon. Members:

Oh, oh.

Topic:   TRADE CONDITIONS
Subtopic:   PROPOSED COMMONWEALTH
Sub-subtopic:   CONFERENCE
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PC

William Earl Rowe

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Rowe:

So far as this issue is concerned at the present time I know that in the United States at different times there has been a market for a lot of potatoes.

Topic:   TRADE CONDITIONS
Subtopic:   PROPOSED COMMONWEALTH
Sub-subtopic:   CONFERENCE
Permalink
LIB

Douglas Charles Abbott (Minister of Finance and Receiver General)

Liberal

Mr. Abbott:

There surely has.

Topic:   TRADE CONDITIONS
Subtopic:   PROPOSED COMMONWEALTH
Sub-subtopic:   CONFERENCE
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PC

William Earl Rowe

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Rowe:

There surely has, yes; but in 1920 we sold in the British market 250 million pounds of bacon; and in 1930, when we were in somewhat the same position as the minister

Trade

indicates today, we were importing from Denmark bacon which was being sold on the butcher shop counters in Regina, and which had been fattened on western grain as well in Denmark. Denmark was selling to Britain over 600 million pounds of bacon a year. We actually lost that market, as the Minister of Agriculture (Mr. Gardiner) so well knows.

It is true that at the present time there is a socialist government in Britain, but even that might change-

An hen. Member: We hope.

Topic:   TRADE CONDITIONS
Subtopic:   PROPOSED COMMONWEALTH
Sub-subtopic:   CONFERENCE
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PC

William Earl Rowe

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Rowe:

But regardless of that, we have been losing these markets, and no one knows that better than the Minister of Agriculture. He seems to say these things himself but he does not like my saying them. He knows we are losing this market. Several years ago he told us in the house how many trade agreements we had with Britain. He named them over and over. We had trade agreements for cheese, for bacon, for wheat, for eggs, for powdered milk. We had all sorts of trade agreements. We have lost them.

Topic:   TRADE CONDITIONS
Subtopic:   PROPOSED COMMONWEALTH
Sub-subtopic:   CONFERENCE
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LIB

James Garfield Gardiner (Minister of Agriculture)

Liberal

Mr. Gardiner:

We never had as many as you fellows say we had.

Topic:   TRADE CONDITIONS
Subtopic:   PROPOSED COMMONWEALTH
Sub-subtopic:   CONFERENCE
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PC

William Earl Rowe

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Rowe:

We have lost them so fast it was difficult to keep track of them.

In 1946 the United Kingdom drew up new trade agreements with foreign countries, with other parts of the empire, with other parts of the sterling area, and indeed with countries inside and outside the iron curtain. But, Mr. Speaker, that is not the most alarming feature of these trade agreements. The most alarming feature is that they have been drawn up for five and ten years. That is why in all sincerity I urge this government to take cognizance of the motion that has been moved and try to sit around a table with other members of the British commonwealth and empire to see if there is not something they need. I know very well that we have been importing into Canada in the last couple of years millions of dollars' worth of goods that could have been purchased in the sterling area. I know, and other hon. members know, that the United Kingdom was selling to Russia, to Czechoslovakia, Yugoslavia, and Poland, heavy steel equipment that we could have used here. Surely, you could sit around with a group of businessmen and work out something on that score. What is going to happen? Why are we going to spend a billion dollars to get ready to support the Atlantic pact unless we are going to be secure in trade? Would it not be the feasible thing to ask around the conference table when you are having a caucus of all the members of the British commonwealth and empire? What is going to happen if some

time, like a flash in the night, we are in a death struggle with that great power to the west? Could we not say to one of the members of the commonwealth: You have been getting pit props from there; you have been buying your lumber from there; you have been buying a million tons of barley and wheat from there at a time when we cannot sell our wheat. These are conditions that could be developed.

I know that the Minister of Agriculture, every member of the government and every member of the House of Commons must be a bit concerned about the near future. There would have to be a change overnight because we would have to be their suppliers again. Therefore, if we are so essential to them in time of trouble, and we talk so much about the Atlantic pact, and how we must stick together in time of trouble, surely there is a chance to sit down and talk in time of peace.

Topic:   TRADE CONDITIONS
Subtopic:   PROPOSED COMMONWEALTH
Sub-subtopic:   CONFERENCE
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February 28, 1950