June 25, 1951

PC

John George Diefenbaker

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Diefenbaker:

That is correct.

Topic:   MOTIONS FOR PAPERS
Subtopic:   CORRESPONDENCE WITH MING SUNG INDUSTRIAL COMPANY AND DAVIE SHIPBUILDING COMPANY
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LIB

Elie Beauregard (Speaker of the Senate)

Liberal

Mr. Speaker:

Carried, subject to the

remarks made by the Minister of Finance.

Topic:   MOTIONS FOR PAPERS
Subtopic:   CORRESPONDENCE WITH MING SUNG INDUSTRIAL COMPANY AND DAVIE SHIPBUILDING COMPANY
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MING SUNG INDUSTRIAL COMPANY

CORRES- PONDENCE WITH GOVERNMENT OF HONG KONG

PC

John George Diefenbaker

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Diefenbaker:

For a copy of all letters, telegrams, and other communications which, since January 1, 1949, and date hereof, have passed between any department of the government of Canada and any official of the government of Hong Kong, relating to exemptions granted to the Ming Sung Industrial Company Limited, under both the Canadian and British shipping acts of the said company.

Topic:   MING SUNG INDUSTRIAL COMPANY
Subtopic:   CORRES- PONDENCE WITH GOVERNMENT OF HONG KONG
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LIB

Louis Stephen St-Laurent (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Mr. St. Laurent:

There is no objection on the part of the government to the production of these papers, and the usual courtesy application has already gone forward to the government of Hong Kong for its consent. The trade commissioner there was asked to make dispatch in getting an answer from the government in Hong Kong.

Topic:   MING SUNG INDUSTRIAL COMPANY
Subtopic:   CORRES- PONDENCE WITH GOVERNMENT OF HONG KONG
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PC

John George Diefenbaker

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Diefenbaker:

Would it be possible to have it before the end of the week?

Topic:   MING SUNG INDUSTRIAL COMPANY
Subtopic:   CORRES- PONDENCE WITH GOVERNMENT OF HONG KONG
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LIB

Louis Stephen St-Laurent (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Mr. St. Laurent:

I hope so. As I say, the commissioner was asked to make dispatch in getting an answer.

Topic:   MING SUNG INDUSTRIAL COMPANY
Subtopic:   CORRES- PONDENCE WITH GOVERNMENT OF HONG KONG
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LIB

Elie Beauregard (Speaker of the Senate)

Liberal

Mr. Speaker:

Carried.

Topic:   MING SUNG INDUSTRIAL COMPANY
Subtopic:   CORRES- PONDENCE WITH GOVERNMENT OF HONG KONG
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FISHERIES

NEWFOUNDLAND


On the orders of the day:


LIB

Robert Wellington Mayhew (Minister of Fisheries)

Liberal

Hon. R. W. Mayhew (Minister of Fisheries):

Mr. Speaker, on Thursday last the hon. member for St. John's West (Mr. Browne), while I was out of the city, asked a question which was directed to the Prime Minister, about a shortage of salt in Newfoundland.

My advice from the chairman of the Newfoundland fisheries board is that some shortage did exist, but its extent was exaggerated. In a wire from him this morning he confirms that there is no shortage at present. I am informed that in some localities in these bays, fish had struck into the shore traps earlier than usual. In some areas the local merchants had not adequate supplies on hand, and in trying to effect a quick distribution of salt to these areas the shortage of small boats for transportation delayed supplies. My information this morning is that stocks are generally ample and well distributed geographically, through the action of the trade itself. In other words, there is no general shortage of salt in Newfoundland at the present time. There is difficulty in getting it from one place to another as speedily as they would like, but other supplies are coming in gradually.

Topic:   FISHERIES
Subtopic:   NEWFOUNDLAND
Sub-subtopic:   LOSS OF CODFISH ON ACCOUNT OF SCARCITY OF SALT
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STATEMENT OF MR. MALIK AS TO NEGOTIATIONS FOR CEASE-FIRE AND ARMISTICE


On the orders of the day:


PC

George Alexander Drew (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Progressive Conservative

Mr. George A. Drew (Leader of ihe Opposition):

In view of the extremely

important statement made by Mr. Malik on Saturday and since the Secretary of State for External Affairs (Mr. Pearson), who is in London, has commented on that statement in London, is the Prime Minister in a position to make any comments that would enlighten the house as to the attitude of the government toward this statement? May I say that I am not pressing for any statement, my question being prompted only by the fact that comments had been made in London by the Secretary of State for External Affairs.

Topic:   STATEMENT OF MR. MALIK AS TO NEGOTIATIONS FOR CEASE-FIRE AND ARMISTICE
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LIB

Louis Stephen St-Laurent (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Right Hon. L. S. St. Laurent (Prime Minister):

I understand that some newspaper men in London put certain questions to the Secretary of State for External Affairs to which he replied. I have not had time to consider the replies carefully because I received the clippings just as I came into the house. There is no doubt that the Secretary of State for . External Affairs, like all the rest of us, regards that statement as an important development. It is one with which the United-Nations will no doubt be dealing expeditiously, and I think it might perhaps be convenient to put on the record of this house the statement made by the secretary general, Mr. Trygve Lie, which was in the following form:

In recent weeks, the qualified spokesmen of many' of,-the governments "whose forces are participating in the United Nations action in Korea, and I, as

Inquiries of the Ministry secretary general, have expressed hope for a military cease-fire in Korea in the vicinity of the 38th parallel. The delegate of the U.S.S.R., deputy foreign minister Jacob A. Malik, now has also expressed his hope for such a cease-fire.

The United Nations forces have been fighting in Korea to uphold peace and security under the United Nations charter. From the outset, the United Nations have made it clear again and again that the first step to the restoration of peace in Korea must be a cease-fire. Such a cease-fire should involve only the military arrangements necessary to stop the fighting and to ensure against its renewal.

I urge that negotiations for a military cease-fire now be entered into at the earliest possible date.

If such a cease-fire can be attained, the political issues involved in the restoration of peace and security in Korea can then be appropriately discussed in the competent organs of the United Nations.

I am further informed that Mr. Entezam, president of the general assembly, and also chairman of the good offices committee, has come from Washington to New York in order to be in touch with the representatives of the United Nations there and to take such immediate action as may be appropriate and to do so in the hope that this is a statement of a real desire to see a cease-fire and a withdrawal of opposing troops on either side [DOT] of the 38th parallel brought about at once.

I think hon. members would be interested to know that among the clippings I got was one referring to a radio broadcast in the capital of communist China reporting this statement of Mr. Malik and an editorial saying that if America was willing to stop the war she should bring in at once those just and reasonable measures for peaceful settlement which have been repeatedly proposed by the people's republic of China, the Soviet union, and other countries desiring peace.

Of course that statement was along the same line; even Mr. Malik's statement was much along the traditional line of having about fourteen minutes of violent vituperation and then a half a minute in which to make the statement that he thought the problem of armed conflict in Korea could be settled - at this time. That is the usual manner in which such proposals are put forward by the U.S.S.R., but we have had former experience of their violent vituperation having been followed by something which was really serious and intended to be effective. I hope this may prove to be another such example.

Topic:   STATEMENT OF MR. MALIK AS TO NEGOTIATIONS FOR CEASE-FIRE AND ARMISTICE
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PC

George Alexander Drew (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Drew:

In view of the statement made by the Prime Minister, may I join in the hope which'he has expressed, and I am sure every Canadian will join with me. In view of the important part that Canada is bound to play in any discussion which takes place, and the desirability of achieving such a measure of

Inquiries of the Ministry unanimity as may be possible in this house, no matter what our views may be on other subjects, I urge the Prime Minister to keep us fully informed as to the developments, subject of course to such terms of secrecy as necessarily are associated with extremely important considerations of this kind.

As the Prime Minister has pointed out, the statement by Mr. Malik was hardly designed to make an impression of sweet reasonableness; nevertheless on this anniversary of the attack in Korea, I think we should bear in mind that the Russians have backed down on other occasions-as they did in Greece; as they did in Azerbaijan; as they did also in connection with the airlift to Berlin. Certainly I think all of us will hope that this is not merely a part of a sham peace campaign, but a genuine offer to terminate hostilities, which can certainly benefit no one, and which, if terminated, may be the beginning of a period during which, by the combined strength of the free nations, we may attain the measure of security for which we are all hoping.

Topic:   STATEMENT OF MR. MALIK AS TO NEGOTIATIONS FOR CEASE-FIRE AND ARMISTICE
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LIB

Louis Stephen St-Laurent (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Mr. St. Laurent:

I may add that this morning the Secretary of State for External Affairs is conferring with Mr. Herbert Morrison, the United Kingdom foreign minister, and that our ambassador in Washington was in touch yesterday and is in touch today with the Secretary of State there. The language of this declaration is being carefully scrutinized, and there is no indication anywhere that it will be brushed off. It will be explored with a sincere desire, at least on our side, to have it produce some results.

Topic:   STATEMENT OF MR. MALIK AS TO NEGOTIATIONS FOR CEASE-FIRE AND ARMISTICE
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CCF

Angus MacInnis

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. Angus Maclnnis (Vancouver East):

Mr. Speaker, I should like to associate the members of this group with the remarks of the Prime Minister and the Leader of the Opposition. The statement made on Saturday by Mr. Malik is one of exceeding importance, and whether or not its purpose is propaganda, the United Nations should now have sufficient experience, if that is the intention, to turn it back on the Soviet union. But perhaps its purpose is not propaganda. We should and do welcome the statement made by the secretary general of the United Nations. It must be the earnest hope of everyone that a cease-fire order may be possible. Once a cease-fire order is made, it is doubtful that the fighting would begin again.

Topic:   STATEMENT OF MR. MALIK AS TO NEGOTIATIONS FOR CEASE-FIRE AND ARMISTICE
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June 25, 1951