February 17, 1953

PRIVATE BILLS

FIRST READINGS-SENATE BILLS


Bill No. 113, for the relief of Marguerite Irene Bastien Tasehereau.-Mr. Winkler. Bill No. 114, for the relief of William Gordon Quinn.-Mr. Winkler. Bill No. 115, for the relief of Joseph Brennan.-Mr. Winkler. Bill No. 116, for the relief of Henry Colling-wood.-Mr. Winkler. Bill No. 117, for the relief of Douglas Malcolm Stephen.-Mr. Winkler. Bill No. 118, for the relief of Mary Lane Taylor.-Mr. Winkler. Bill No. 119, for the relief of Stanley Gordon Fowler.-Mr. Winkler. Bill No. 120, for the relief of Ethel Florence Flack Towne.-Mr. Winkler. Bill No. 121, for the relief of Mary Katherine Randell Clarke.-Mr. Winkler. Bill No. 122, for the relief of Ralph Wellington Goodyear.-Mr. Winkler. Bill No. 123, for the relief of Donalda Gagnon Fontaine.-Mr. Winkler. 1S99 Bill No. 124, for the relief of Marie Sylvaine Alain Dahlstrom.-Mr. Winkler. Bill No. 125, for the relief of Ruth Schwartz Cohen.-Mr. Winkler. Bill No. 126, for the relief of Annie Mislo-vitch Cohen.-Mr. Winkler. Bill No. 127, for the relief of Minnie Miki Simon Werkzeig, otherwise known as Minnie Miki Simon Werk.-Mr. Winkler. Bill No. 128, for the relief of Antonio Proietti.-Mr. Winkler. Bill No. 129, for the relief of Ida Hier Blant.-Mr. Winkler. Bill No. 130, for the relief of Hilda Irene Roddis Galbraith.-Mr. Winkler. Bill No. 131, for the relief of Ivy Helen Jean Morton Starke.-Mr. Winkler. Bill No. 132, for the relief of Barney Flegal. -Mr. Winkler. Bill No. 133, for the relief of Marie Renee Emond Walker.-Mr. Winkler. Bill No. 134, for the relief of Edwin George Chafe.,-Mr. Winkler. Bill No. 135, for the relief of Phyllis Violet Perlson Wright.-Mr. Winkler. Bill No. 136, for the relief of Margaret Eadie Kerr Britton.-Mr. Winkler. Bill No. 137, for the relief of George Robert Stirling Henry.-Mr. Winkler. Bill No. 138, for the relief of Margaret Elizabeth Thelma Webb Crothers. Mr. Winkler. Bill No. 139, for the relief of Pauline Liliane Baron Brumby.-Mr. Winkler. Bill No. 140, for the relief of Madeleine Blain Cousineau.-Mr. Winkler. Bill No. 141, for the relief of Angelina Maria Di Battista Gill.-Mr. Winkler. Bill No. 142, for the relief of Charles Snoade Hilder.-Mr. Winkler.


LABOUR CONDITIONS

STRIKE OF GRAIN HANDLERS, VANCOUVER AND NEW WESTMINSTER


On the orders of the day:


LIB

Arthur Laing

Liberal

Mr. Arthur Laing (Vancouver South):

I

should like to address a question to the parliamentary assistant to the Minister of Labour. Does he care to make a statement with regard to the strike of the grain handlers in the cities of Vancouver and New Westminster? This work stoppage has wide ramifications.

Topic:   LABOUR CONDITIONS
Subtopic:   STRIKE OF GRAIN HANDLERS, VANCOUVER AND NEW WESTMINSTER
Permalink
LIB

Paul-Émile Côté (Parliamentary Assistant to the Minister of Labour)

Liberal

Mr. Paul E. Cote (Parliamentary Assistant to the Minister of Labour):

Mr. Speaker, I

thank the hon. member for giving notice of this question which has to do with the dispute and strike affecting local 333, International Union of United Brewery, Flour, Cereal, Soft

Inquiries of the Ministry Drink and Distillery Workers of America, and various Vancouver grain elevator companies.

The following is a brief review of events leading up to the present situation involving the previously mentioned parties.

The collective agreement between the parties was entered into on May 30, 1952, effective December 1, 1951, until November 30, 1952; and thereafter to remain in effect unless written notice is given by either party to the other at least thirty days prior to November 30, 1952, that revision of the agreement is desired.

Such notice was given on October 28, 1952, by the union to (1) Searle Co. Ltd.; (2) Pacific Elevators Ltd.; (3) United Grain Growers Ltd.; (4) Kerr Gifford and Co. Inc.; and (5) Alberta Wheat Pool, all of Vancouver, B.C.

The main proposals included: (1) the

eight-hour five-day week, starting midnight Sunday and ending midnight Friday; (2) a 10 cent premium for employees working on the third or midnight shift; (3) three extra statutory holidays; (4) three weeks' vacation after 10 years' service; (5) that the new agreement contain a list of job classifications; (6) 12 cents per hour increase in present rates; and (7) dust money of 10 cents per hour.

Representatives of both parties held meetings in November, 1952, but could come to no agreement. On November 17, 1952, the situation was discussed by Mr. Edward Sims, Canadian director of the union and Mr. R. H. Tupper, Q.C., representing the companies, with our senior conciliation officer at Vancouver, Mr. George Currie. Both parties expressed the opinion that further negotiations either with or without the assistance of the conciliation officer would be useless and stated the parties desired the establishment of a board of conciliation.

On November 21, the Minister of Labour (Mr. Gregg) received a joint request for the establishment of a board of conciliation and investigation to deal with the dispute, and on November 22 a board was established. The companies nominated Mr. Thomas E. H. Ellis, and Mr. James Bury was nominated by the union. In the absence of a joint recommendation by these nominees of the parties the minister on December 18 appointed Dr. Joseph A. Crumb, professor of economics and political science, University of British Columbia, to be the third member and chairman of the board.

On January 23, the minister received the report of the board making the following recommendations: One, the work day and

2000 HOUSE OF

Inquiries of the Ministry the work week; that the employers undertake to minimize Saturday and Sunday work but that they should not be committed to a standard Monday through Friday schedule for a work week. Two, premium for night shift; for the third shift the majority report recommended a differential of 10 cents per hour. The company nominee felt that existing arrangements were satisfactory. Three, statutory holidays; the majority report recommended that the number of holidays be fixed at eight. The company nominee recommended that the number be left at six. Four, vacations; that this request be set aside. Five, job classifications; the majority report recommended that this request be met but with the proviso that the union respects management's right to establish job classifications and to set rates applicable thereto. The company nominee disagreed. Six, wage rates; the majority report recommended that the present hourly rate of $1.50 should continue during the next contract year. The union nominee recommended that the 12-cent-per-hour increase be granted. Seven, dust premium; the majority report recommended a 10-cent-per-hour premium rate. The company nominee recommended that the existing uniform rate be maintained.

On January 29 the minister was informed that the recommendations of the board were not acceptable to the companies. On February 5, he was informed that the union accepted the majority recommendations signed by Dr. Crumb and Mr. Bury and the minority recommendation respecting wages signed by Mr. Bury.

On February 10, the Department of Labour was informed by the union that unless settlement was reached the employees would strike on February 16. Our information is that work stopped yesterday morning and operations are at a standstill. The total number of men involved is approximately 250. Both parties are aware, through an informal meeting with our conciliation officer on February 6, 1953, that mediation services of the department are available to them, but no request has been made by either party for further mediation. The department is constantly in touch with the situation and hon. members may be assured that everything possible will be done to bring about an early settlement of the strike.

Topic:   LABOUR CONDITIONS
Subtopic:   STRIKE OF GRAIN HANDLERS, VANCOUVER AND NEW WESTMINSTER
Permalink

STRIKE OF GRAIN HANDLERS

INQUIRY AS TO ACTION TO MOVE GRAIN


On the orders of the day:


LIB

Frederick Hugo Larson

Liberal

Mr. F. H. Larson (Kindersley):

Mr. Speaker, I should like to address a question to the [Mr. Cote (Verdun-La Salle) .1

Minister of Trade and Commerce. In view of a report in the Ottawa Journal of February 16 that Canada is losing millions of bushels of wheat sales owing to the grain handlers' strike on the west coast, does the government contemplate taking any immediate action to get this grain moving?

Topic:   STRIKE OF GRAIN HANDLERS
Subtopic:   INQUIRY AS TO ACTION TO MOVE GRAIN
Permalink
LIB

Clarence Decatur Howe (Minister of Defence Production; Minister of Trade and Commerce)

Liberal

Right Hon. C. D. Howe (Minister of Trade and Commerce):

Mr. Speaker, I hardly think it can be said that the government is losing millions of bushels of sales. The capacity of the west coast has been practically all sold, or could have been all sold. We have outlets at North Vancouver, Victoria and Prince Rupert on the west coast still in operation, and at Saint John and Halifax on the east coast. It is very unfortunate indeed that this year, when a record has already been made for movement through the west coast, this strike should tie up the movement of grain. It will mean demurrage for the boats; but as far as the Department of Trade and Commerce are concerned we are quite satisfied to leave the settlement of the strike in the hands of the Department of Labour.

Topic:   STRIKE OF GRAIN HANDLERS
Subtopic:   INQUIRY AS TO ACTION TO MOVE GRAIN
Permalink

INTERNATIONAL WHEAT AGREEMENT

INSTRUCTIONS TO CANADIAN REPRESENTATIVES


On the orders of the day:


PC

John George Diefenbaker

Progressive Conservative

Mr. J. G. Diefenbaker (Lake Centre):

I

should like to direct a question to the Minister of Trade and Commerce in connection with a matter of interest to the western farmer, namely, the international wheat agreement conference in Washington. Will he say what the present position is, and also tell the house what instructions the representatives of 'Canada have as to the minimum and maximum prices that they expect under the agreement now being negotiated?

Topic:   INTERNATIONAL WHEAT AGREEMENT
Subtopic:   INSTRUCTIONS TO CANADIAN REPRESENTATIVES
Permalink
LIB

Clarence Decatur Howe (Minister of Defence Production; Minister of Trade and Commerce)

Liberal

Right Hon. C. D. Howe (Minister of Trade and Commerce):

I can only repeat what I said on an earlier occasion, that the meetings are in camera and are proceeding. As far as I know progress is reasonably satisfactory and discussions are taking the course that one would expect from meetings of this kind. A good deal of harmony is being displayed between the contracting parties.

As far as the instructions from Canada are concerned, the Canadian government representatives are in Washington with advisers from prairie wheat organizations. The instructions are to negotiate the best deal that seems possible and to report the results back for the consideration of the government. I am sure that our representatives will do that.

Topic:   INTERNATIONAL WHEAT AGREEMENT
Subtopic:   INSTRUCTIONS TO CANADIAN REPRESENTATIVES
Permalink
PC

John George Diefenbaker

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Diefenbaker:

Very uncertain.

Topic:   INTERNATIONAL WHEAT AGREEMENT
Subtopic:   INSTRUCTIONS TO CANADIAN REPRESENTATIVES
Permalink

UNITED NATIONS

February 17, 1953