June 7, 1956

CCF

Major James William Coldwell

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. M. J. Coldwell (Hosetown-Biggar):

Mr. Speaker, we were all profoundly shocked and distressed yesterday when we learned of the news of the sudden passing of our friend and colleague in this house, Jack MacDougall. We shall miss that hearty greeting he would give when you met him in the corridors in the morning or in the cafeteria or elsewhere. We shall miss that friendly way he had with him always. We can ill afford to lose, particularly at times like these, one who is universally friendly and for whom we have such a universal feeling of friendship. It brings home to us once again, Mr. Speaker, the fact that in the midst of life we are in death. Edmund Burke once said at the funeral of, I believe, a political opponent who was taken in the middle of a contest: "The worthy gentleman . . . has feelingly told us what shadows we are, and what shadows we pursue." Those matters which we felt so keenly about during

the past week, whether on one side or the other, are after all fleeting things, shadows that flit away.

Mr. MacDougall has not only left many friends but he left in this house records of his work here. I am sure that whether we agree or disagree with the projects which he took over in this house, he urged them because he thought they were in the best interests of those who worked in offices, stores or labour throughout this country. I refer, of course, to the fact that he promoted the bill which caused the celebration of Victoria day to fall on Mondays instead of other days during the week. He did so because he believed, rightly or wrongly, that this was of benefit to the people whom he served.

So, Mr. Speaker, we join, too, in the tribute that has been paid. He was a fellow citizen of mine in the city of Regina for a while when he practised his profession which, we have heard, he had to relinquish on account of his physical condition. I think few of us realized the extent of the ill health which he suffered. We join with everyone not only in this house, but I am quite sure his countless friends across the country, in mourning his loss and expressing to his widow, who has been his constant companion throughout the years, our heartfelt sympathy in her sorrow and her grief.

Topic:   ANSWERS TO QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   APPENDIX
Sub-subtopic:   GATT-ANNOUNCEMENT OF RESULTS OF GENEVA CONFERENCE
Permalink
SC

Alexander Bell Patterson

Social Credit

Mr. A. B. Patterson (Fraser Valley):

Mr. Speaker, as a member of the Social Credit group of this house and as a representative from the province of British Columbia, it is my privilege this afternoon to pay tribute to the memory of a friend whose service to his constituents, to his province and to his country has been so very suddenly brought to a close. We in this group would like to join in the expressions of sorrow and sympathy that have been voiced in this chamber this afternoon.

Several qualities were evidenced by the late member for Vancouver-Burrard for which he will be especially remembered, and some of those have been mentioned by the previous speakers. One thing that has impressed me since I came to the House of Commons and had the privilege of getting to know Mr. MacDougall was his unfailing cheerfulness and his friendliness. Perhaps because I came here rather recently and Mr. MacDougall had been here for some time I appreciated that spirit all the more. Whenever we had the opportunity of meeting, regardless of the surroundings, there was always that happy and cheerful salutation, and I am sure that I as well as all other hon. members will miss that greeting in the days that lie ahead.

I also noted the devotion which characterized the life of our departed friend. His loyalty to the responsibilities that his constituents had placed upon him has left a deep impression upon my own life. I believe as well there was a real sense of the value of the moral and spiritual resources as far as our friend was concerned. On more than one occasion I listened to him as he addressed this house and made reference to his faith in God and the things which are spiritual.

There is another thing by which I shall remember him, and that is his sense of fairness. There are always sharp differences of opinion, as is expected in political life, but his loyalty to his own party and policies did not keep him from respecting the views of those who differed with him, nor did it keep him from giving credit when he felt such credit was warranted. Therefore, for those qualities of life and character I am sure we are all going to remember Mr. Mac-Dougall.

We in this group would join in our expressions of sympathy to Mrs. MacDougall and assure her of our prayers at this time. Certainly, I am sure the prayer of us all is that God, who is the God of all comfort and grace, will be her sufficiency in this time of sorrow. We express our sympathy to his constituents in the loss of a faithful servant; we express as well our sympathy to the Prime Minister, to his colleagues and to the party of which Mr. MacDougall was a member. I am sure that today and in the future we shall all miss Jack MacDougall.

Topic:   ANSWERS TO QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   APPENDIX
Sub-subtopic:   GATT-ANNOUNCEMENT OF RESULTS OF GENEVA CONFERENCE
Permalink
LIB

Ralph Osborne Campney (Minister of National Defence)

Liberal

Hon. R. O. Campney (Minister of National Defence):

Mr. Speaker, may I, on behalf of my British Columbia colleagues and myself, add a word of tribute to the memory of the late member for Vancouver-Burrard who was taken from us so suddenly yesterday. May I also extend our very deep sympathy to his devoted wife who has given him such abiding help and encouragement and loyalty throughout the years.

As has been said here in such eloquent terms this afternoon, Dr. Jack MacDougall was greatly beloved by every member of this house. He was indeed "the happy warrior".

In spite of grievous wounds sustained in world war I, in spite of recurring illnesses which afflicted him throughout many years, and even latterly as he well knew under the very shadow of death itself, he was always active, cheerful and inspiring. I am sure that the sheer courage with which he triumphed over all the vicissitudes of life will long continue to be an inspiration to every member of this house.

The late J. L. MacDougall

He was a great Liberal and a strong party man, yet he could upon occasion be thoroughly independent, as all of us here well know. Stern characteristics of the old Scottish covenanter were always peeping through in his attitude toward men and affairs.

He served his constituency, his province and his country devotedly and well. To thousands of people in Vancouver and throughout British Columbia where he lived and worked for so many years he proved himself a true and valued friend. I do not know of anything finer that I could say of him than that.

For his good example, for his fine character, for his wit and humour, for all his lovable qualities, we shall miss him greatly here in this chamber.

As we take our leave of him may I paraphrase the immortal words of John Bunyan: "My marks and scars I carry with me, to be a witness for me, that I have fought His battles Who now will 'be my rewarder. . . and all the trumpets sounded... on the other side".

Topic:   ANSWERS TO QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   APPENDIX
Sub-subtopic:   GATT-ANNOUNCEMENT OF RESULTS OF GENEVA CONFERENCE
Permalink
PC

Howard Charles Green

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Howard C. Green (Vancouver-Quadra):

Mr. Speaker, the constituencies of Vancouver-Burrard and Vancouver-Quadra lie side by side throughout most of their length and for that reason and also because of the great friendship which had grown up between the late Dr. MacDougall and myself I should like to add just a few words today.

In his home city of Vancouver, Dr. Mac-Dougall's passing will be mourned by thousands of his fellow citizens who knew him and loved him for many reasons, perhaps most of all for the many kind deeds he had done for so many of them and also for his spirit of service and for the wonderfully cheery spirit with which he faced life in spite of severe handicaps. Those qualities, of course, have been manifested here and have endeared him to every member of the House of Commons.

I am sure I speak for every one of us when I say that a great-hearted Canadian has gone from our midst. I should like to join in extending sympathy to his wife, who has been such a wonderful life partner.

Topic:   ANSWERS TO QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   APPENDIX
Sub-subtopic:   GATT-ANNOUNCEMENT OF RESULTS OF GENEVA CONFERENCE
Permalink
LIB

Donald Ferguson Brown

Liberal

Mr. D. F. Brown (Essex West):

May I be

permitted to say a word on behalf of those government supporters who constitute the rump in this House of Commons. We have known and revered Jack MacDougall as an associate since 1949 and we will long remember him. We in this part of the house in particular have appreciated the wit which he expressed on various occasions. We realize that he had a friendship with all members of this house. We realize too that every

GATT-Tariff Revisions hon. member knew Jack MacDougall. We remember his sincere friendship, rugged but faithful friendship, which he established in this house. We remember him for the fidelity which he showed in this house to his party and in connection with all matters in which he participated.

To Mrs. MacDougall, who was his constant companion, we express our sincere love and sympathy. Jack MacDougall has not died, for the qualities which he expressed so well will remain an inspiration to the hearts and minds of the members of the rump for the years to come.

Topic:   ANSWERS TO QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   APPENDIX
Sub-subtopic:   GATT-ANNOUNCEMENT OF RESULTS OF GENEVA CONFERENCE
Permalink

THE ROYAL ASSENT

LIB

Louis-René Beaudoin (Speaker of the House of Commons)

Liberal

Mr. Speaker:

I have the honour to inform the house that I have received the following communication:

Ottawa, June 7. 1956

Sir:

I have the honour to inform you that the Honourable Patrick Kerwin, Chief Justice of Canada, acting as Deputy of His Excellency the Governor General, will proceed to the Senate chamber today, the 7th June, at 5.45 p.m., for the purpose of giving the royal assent to certain bills.

I have the honour to be, sir,

Your obedient servant,

J. F. Delaute,

Secretary to the Governor General (Administrative).

Topic:   ANSWERS TO QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   THE ROYAL ASSENT
Permalink

MISCELLANEOUS PRIVATE BILLS


Ninth and tenth reports of standing committee on miscellaneous private bills.- Mr. Henderson.


ANNOUNCEMENT OF RESULTS OF GENEVA

LIB

Clarence Decatur Howe (Minister of Defence Production; Minister of Trade and Commerce)

Liberal

Right Hon. C. D. Howe (Minister of Trade and Commerce):

Mr. Speaker, I wish to make a brief statement on the tariff negotiations which have recently been successfully completed in Geneva. A detailed statement of these results was tabled in the house at eleven o'clock this morning, the time which was agreed to in advance with the other countries. For the convenience of hon. members I would suggest that that statement be printed as an appendix to Hansard.

I am happy to say that Canada has concluded new agreements at this conference with the United States and with 12 of our other trading partners in both Europe and Latin America. These agreements were signed on May 23 in Geneva on behalf of Canada by Mr. L. D. Wilgress, Canadian ambassador to NATO, who was also the chairman of the Canadian delegation. The new tariff

rates agreed to at this conference will not come into effect until the end of June at the earliest.

The new GATT agreements represent a further addition to the significant and substantial progress already achieved in previous GATT conferences in the reduction of tariff barriers throughout the world. The benefits obtained by Canada in these latest negotiations will lead to useful, practical gains for Canadian exporters of a wide range of products and in many markets. In addition to the concessions obtained directly by Canada, we will also benefit from all the concessions resulting from negotiations between the other participants, and this is one of the great advantages of a multilateral negotiation under GATT.

These new agreements will further strengthen the basis of confidence and cooperation so essential in world trade. It is appropriate at this time to reaffirm Canada's view of the usefulness of GATT as a framework for the conduct of trade and for the development of common trading policies. In this connection, the establishment of the organization for trade co-operation to administer GATT on a continuing basis would render the agreement more effective and would have a most encouraging influence on international relations.

The Canadian government has consistently supported this proposed organization and is prepared to take steps to provide for Canadian participation at the appropriate time. The United Kingdom has already indicated its acceptance, and it is our hope that all the members of GATT, and particularly the other leading trading countries whose support is essential, will similarly find it possible to join in its establishment.

The agreement concluded between Canada and the United States is one of the major agreements resulting from this conference. The concessions that could be made by the United States were limited by United States legislation to maximum tariff reductions of 15 per cent, spread over the next two years. Also, there were a number of items, particularly in the agricultural and fisheries field, on which the United States was not prepared to negotiate at this time. Within these limitations, however, we have concluded an agreement which should be most satisfactory to both countries. The fact that United States concessions would be implemented in three stages was, of course, taken fully into account by our negotiators in determining the nature of the concessions Canada could justifiably grant. Canada has obtained maximum concessions on a large number of products, including various chemicals, certain metals,

some agricultural items and a number of manufactured products and machinery. I am sure the house will welcome this agreement as a further step in our joint efforts to reduce trade barriers between Canada and the United States.

Canada has traditional and important trade relations with Europe and Latin America. It is our earnest desire and intention to continue to strengthen these close relations and to work with the countries of these areas in expanding our trade in both directions. As part of this general policy, Canada has concluded new agreements with Austria, the Benelux countries, Denmark, Western Germany, Italy, Norway and Sweden. Canadian exporters will obtain useful benefits from the concessions granted by these countries, many of which have made significant progress in the removal of import restrictions. Canada has also made agreements with Cuba, the Dominican Republic and Haiti, which are open dollar markets for Canadian goods. I am confident that these various agreements will serve to emphasize the importance of our trade with the countries of these areas and will stimulate even closer connections between us.

In multilateral negotiations which involve reductions in most-favoured-nation tariffs, it is customary for both Canada and the United Kingdom to alter certain of the tariff preferences accorded to the other. Most of the reductions in margins of preference of interest to Canadian exporters in the United Kingdom are relatively minor. There were, of course, opportunities for informal exchanges of views on matters of common interest between Canada and the United Kingdom as the negotiations progressed.

To conclude, I would stress that Canada as a major trading nation has a vital interest in the expansion of world trade in an atmosphere of confidence and co-operation between countries. By entering into these latest negotiations under the auspices of GATT, the major trading countries have given renewed evidence of their intention to pursue the constructive policies that have been developed and strengthened through common effort.

As to the concessions granted by Canada, my colleague the Minister of Finance (Mr. Harris) will wish to make some comments.

Topic:   ANSWERS TO QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   ANNOUNCEMENT OF RESULTS OF GENEVA
Sub-subtopic:   CONFERENCE
Permalink
LIB

Louis-René Beaudoin (Speaker of the House of Commons)

Liberal

Mr. Speaker:

The minister referred to a statement which he said should be published as an appendix to Hansard.

Topic:   ANSWERS TO QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   ANNOUNCEMENT OF RESULTS OF GENEVA
Sub-subtopic:   CONFERENCE
Permalink
LIB

Clarence Decatur Howe (Minister of Defence Production; Minister of Trade and Commerce)

Liberal

Mr. Howe (Port Arthur):

Yes.

Topic:   ANSWERS TO QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   ANNOUNCEMENT OF RESULTS OF GENEVA
Sub-subtopic:   CONFERENCE
Permalink
LIB

Louis-René Beaudoin (Speaker of the House of Commons)

Liberal

Mr. Speaker:

Is there unanimous consent for that purpose?

GATT-Tariff Revisions

Topic:   ANSWERS TO QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   ANNOUNCEMENT OF RESULTS OF GENEVA
Sub-subtopic:   CONFERENCE
Permalink
?

Some hon. Members:

Agreed.

(For text of detailed statement see appendix, pages 4834-41.)

Topic:   ANSWERS TO QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   ANNOUNCEMENT OF RESULTS OF GENEVA
Sub-subtopic:   CONFERENCE
Permalink
LIB

Walter Edward Harris (Minister of Finance and Receiver General; Leader of the Government in the House of Commons; Liberal Party House Leader)

Liberal

Hon. W. E. Harris (Minister of Finance):

Mr. Speaker, the tariff concessions made by Canada at this last tariff conference at Geneva, to which my colleague the Minister of Trade and Commerce (Mr. Howe) has referred, cover 180 items or sub-items in our customs tariff. Of these, 115 are reductions in the present most-favoured-nation rates of duty and 55 are undertakings not to raise existing rates of duty. For five items Canada undertook not to raise duties above certain specified rates higher than those actually in effect, but which in all five cases are lower than the rates previously agreed to under GATT. The remaining five items are reductions in the British preferential tariff, made unilaterally by Canada concurrent with reductions in the most-favoured-nation tariff.

Canada's concessions are set out in schedule V to the sixth protocol of supplementary concessions, and I should like to table copies of that schedule in English and French. This schedule consists of two parts, part I covering the most-favoured-nation tariff, and part II covering the British preferential tariff. The Canadian concessions will not come into effect immediately, but will be implemented at appropriate times having regard to the time at which other countries put their concessions into effect. I should make clear too that the Canadian concessions to each country will be brought into effect in one step.

Canada's total imports during the calendar year 1955 from all countries under the 115 items or sub-items on which the mostfavoured-nation tariff was reduced at Geneva amounted to $91 million. Canada's total imports during 1955 from all countries under the 60 items which were bound but not reduced amounted to $88 million.

The reductions in the most-favoured-nation tariff cover a wide range of products such as: textile machinery, orange juice, lettuce, newsprint, shelled oysters, shrimps, spectacle frames, cigars, sawmill machinery, adding machines, cash registers, road building machines, electrical precision apparatus, such as is used in oil refineries and chemical works, cameras and tobacco pipes.

Since GATT negotiations relate to the most-favoured-nation tariff there was no occasion to negotiate reductions of rates of duty under the British preferential tariff. Of course, some margins of preference in the Canadian tariff as well as in the tariffs of other commonwealth countries were reduced

House of Commons

in the course of negotiations with non-commonwealth countries. Of the items in which Canada reduced margins of preference those which covered the largest volume of trade were orange juice, electrical precision apparatus and textile machinery. The great bulk of Canadian imports of these products in 1955 were from non-commonwealth sources.

Part II of schedule V, which I am also tabling, contains five items. As I have mentioned, these provide for unilateral reductions by Canada in preferential rates of duty on certain goods on which the most-favourednation rate is also being reduced.

Topic:   ANSWERS TO QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   ANNOUNCEMENT OF RESULTS OF GENEVA
Sub-subtopic:   CONFERENCE
Permalink

MR. DREW-MOTION OF NON-CONFIDENCE IN PRESIDING OFFICER OF THE HOUSE


The house resumed, from Wednesday, June 6, consideration of the motion of Mr. Drew: In view of the unprecedented action of Mr. Speaker in (a) improperly reversing his own decision without notice and without giving any opportunity for discussion; (b) repeatedly refusing to allow members to address the house on occasions when the rules provide that they have the right to be heard; (c) subordinating the rights of the house to the will of the government, this house resolves that it no longer has any confidence in its presiding officer.


PC

John George Diefenbaker

Progressive Conservative

Mr. J. G. Diefenbaker (Prince Albert):

Mr. Speaker, it is naturally difficult to resume the debate. I said nothing today when the heart of parliament went out to the beloved wife of the member for Vancouver-Burrard. I shall say no more than this, that his life was an example of one who carried on whatever the consequences and he would have expected this house to follow the course of his own life.

Sir, yesterday afternoon the Prime Minister (Mr. St. Laurent) suggested that this motion, having been launched during the debate on the pipe line, should now be withdrawn. I am authorized to say that, in so far as Her Majesty's loyal opposition is concerned, that view cannot be accepted. As the days go by and we look over the things that took place, the unexplained change of ruling on June 1 becomes even more unexplainable. The need for this motion has not been erased by the termination of the pipe-line debate. That debate has gone the way of history. The prerogatives of parliament are abiding and must remain unimpaired. It is interesting that on an occasion such as this we should reread the pages of history. In 1628-on March 22 of that year-the Speaker had failed to listen to the demands of the members of the House of Commons to be heard on questions of privilege. Then suddenly the atmosphere changed. The king needed supplies.

Immediately every opportunity was given for the members of the house to speak. One Sir Robert Phelips-and I have his speech here- said this:

This day's debate makes me call to mind the custom of the Romans, who had a solemn feast once a year for their slaves, at which time they had liberty without exception to speak what they would, whereby to ease their afflicted minds; which being finished, they severally returned to their former servitude.

Those were spectacular words but what he meant was this. The rights of parliament cannot be impaired for the temporary advantage of anyone, including the crown. As I see it, Mr. Speaker, the members of this house cannot stand idly by when their privileges and their rights are jettisoned, if only temporarily, at the will of a determined majority. You, Mr. Speaker, have read the duties and the responsibilities of a Speaker. No one summarized them better or epitomized them to a finer extent than did Mr. Speaker Lowther who, following his termination of office, wrote a book entitled "A Speaker's Commentaries" in which he set forth in a very few lines the duties and responsibilities of the Speaker:

The Speaker must decline to submit motions which infringe the rules; he must decide whether a motion is one of privilege or not; . . .

Then a little later:

The granting or withholding of the closure is another source of considerable anxiety to the occupant of the chair. Have the opposition had a full opportunity of stating their case? Have they made the best of their opportunity? Is there anything more which could be said usefully? Has the subject received its full quota of time in view of the total amount of time available for discussion? These and similar problems present themselves to the Speaker and must be solved in his own mind before he can accept a motion that "the question be now put". It is obvious that no hard and fast rule can be laid down on these matters, and that in each case the Speaker must use his best judgment and discretion.

And finally:

. . . he-

The Speaker.

-is the guardian of the privileges of the house as well as those of its members.

Topic:   ANSWERS TO QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   MR. DREW-MOTION OF NON-CONFIDENCE IN PRESIDING OFFICER OF THE HOUSE
Permalink
LIB

Donald D. Carrick

Liberal

Mr. Carrick:

May I ask my hon. friend

a question?

Topic:   ANSWERS TO QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   MR. DREW-MOTION OF NON-CONFIDENCE IN PRESIDING OFFICER OF THE HOUSE
Permalink

June 7, 1956