January 8, 1957

HOUSE OF COMMONS DEBATES

OFFICIAL REPORT


*>1$, ?[DOT]l! o z,


EDMOND CLOUTIER, C.M.G., O.A., D.S.P.


queen's printer and controller of stationery OTTAWA, 1957



NAT,° caZa0ARC use of Commons! ©etmtetf



Speaker: The Honourable L. Rene Beaudoin Tuesday, January 8, 1957


FIFTH SESSION-TWENTY-SECOND PARLIAMENT-OPENING


The parliament which had been prorogued earlier this day met again at Ottawa for the dispatch of business. Mr. Speaker read a communication from the secretary to the Governor General, announcing that His Excellency the Governor General would proceed to the Senate chamber at 2.30 o'clock on this day, for the purpose of formally opening the session of the dominion parliament. A message was delivered by Major C. ft. Lamoureux, Gentleman Usher of the Black Rod, as follows: Mr. Speaker, His Excellency the Governor General desires the immediate attendance of this honourable house in the chamber of the honourable the Senate. Accordingly, Mr. Speaker with the house went up to the Senate chamber. And the house being returned to the Commons chamber:


OATHS OF OFFICE

LIB

Louis Stephen St-Laurent (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Right Hon. L. S. St. Laurent (Prime Minister) moved

for leave to introduce Bill No. 1, respecting the administration of oaths of office.

Motion agreed to and bill read the first time.

Topic:   OATHS OF OFFICE
Permalink

SPEECH FROM THE THRONE

LIB

Louis-René Beaudoin (Speaker of the House of Commons)

Liberal

Mr. Speaker:

I have the honour to inform the house that when the house did attend His Excellency the Governor General this day in the Senate chamber, His Excellency was pleased to make a speech to both houses 82715-1

of parliament. To prevent mistakes I have obtained a copy, which is as follows: Honourable Members of the Senate:

Members of the House of Commons:

It Is again a pleasure for me to greet you as you resume your parliamentary duties in this new year.

The international scene continues to be characterized by instability in the Middle East and in eastern Europe.

My ministers remain convinced of the need to maintain the basic unity of the commonwealth and the reality of the western alliance, to contribute effectively to the supervision of the cessation of hostilities between Israel and Egypt under the authority of the United Nations and to the achievement of a lasting settlement of Middle East problems.

Visits to Canada in the last few weeks by the prime ministers of Ceylon and India have been conducive to a renewed strengthening of the bonds which unite the peoples of the commonwealth in their constant aim to co-operate in the pursuit of peace, liberty and progress.

An encouraging advance is being made, as evidenced by the latest ministerial meeting of the council, in the development of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization in the non-military as well as in the military field. My ministers remain strongly convinced of the need to maintain the North Atlantic treaty as the keystone of the defence of the western nations.

In the Middle East Canadian servicemen, as part of the United Nations emergency force proposed by Canada at the general assembly of the United Nations, are performing valuable tasks in the interest of world peace.

The United Nations has served to focus world opinion on the brutal repression of the heroic Hungarian people in their endeavour to throw off the yoke of Soviet imperialism. The vast humanitarian problems that have arisen as a result of Soviet intervention require the joint efforts of many countries. Through the United Nations, the Red Cross, and in co-operation with the government of Austria, this country is playing its part in relieving suffering and re-settling the refugees.

The entrance into Canada of Hungarian refugees has been greatly facilitated and free transportation provided from Austria to new homes in this country. Already thousands of these Hungarians have been welcomed to Canada and we look forward to receiving thousands more during the winter and spring. There are also substantially increasing numbers of immigrants from the British Isles arranging to proceed to Canada this year.

Recent events have confirmed my ministers' belief in the importance of seeking solutions to international problems through the United Nations

Speech from the Throne and of upholding by all practical and constructive means the principles of the United Nations charter. My ministers also believe, however, that while making every effort to achieve these long-term goals, the western nations must remain strong and united in their defences and in their diplomacy in order that aggressive action against them will be prevented and international tension can be lessened.

Excellent progress is being made in our national economic development. Expansion is evident in every part of Canada. Rapid strides are being made in opening up and utilizing our natural resources and in our industrial and urban growth. Employment has reached unprecedented levels. Once again we have been blessed with good crops. External trade was considerably greater last year than during any previous year. Canadians in almost every part of the country have been enjoying the benefits of this invigorating economic climate.

Indeed our economic expansion has been so rapid that it has put a serious strain upon the supply of various types of labour and materials needed for the many projects which are being put in hand. The corresponding competition to borrow savings to finance all these projects has brought about an increase in interest rates. Increases in the volume of money and credit have had to be carefully limited in order to check inflationary tendencies and the financial policies of my government have also been directed to counteract these same tendencies.

In the last few days a serious industrial dispute has led to a stoppage of work on one of the major railways of Canada despite the use of the normal processes of conciliation. Special efforts have been made and are continuing to be made by my ministers to assist the parties to reach an agreed settlement.

The preliminary report of the royal commission on economic prospects has been received and will shortly be laid before you.

You will be asked to approve a measure for the establishment of a Canada Council for the arts, humanities and social sciences, in order to give a new impetus to the development of Canadian scholarship and culture. In this measure you will be asked to approve an endowment for the council so that it may discharge its functions with the greatest possible sense of responsibility.

Because it is important that our universities should be able to keep pace with the increasing demands to be made upon them by the increasing number of young Canadians, you will be asked to approve a further grant of money to the Canada Council to be distributed by it for the purpose of assisting Canadian universities in some of their necessary construction projects. You will also be asked to approve the doubling of the annual grants to universities, and the payment of these funds to the national conference of Canadian universities for division by it among the recognized institutions of higher learning.

A measure will be placed before you for the purpose of renewing on a revised and increased basis the federal program of grants to provincial governments in aid of technical and vocational training.

It is proposed to recommend in the Senate the establishment of a committee to consider what should be done to make better use of land for agriculture and thus to contribute more effectively to the improvement of agricultural production and the incomes of those engaged in it.

An amendment extending the scope of the Municipal Grants Act will be laid before you to authorize the payment of grants in lieu of taxes on federal property in all municipalities where such property receives the normal municipal services.

An amendment to the Merchant Seamen Compensation Act will be presented making appropriate improvements in the scale of benefits to disabled seamen and the dependents of deceased seamen.

You will be asked to consider legislation for the implementation of a north Pacific fur seal convention.

An amendment to the Sockeye Salmon Convention Act to include pink salmon in this international agreement will also be laid before you.

You will be asked to consider a revision of the law controlling narcotic drugs in the light of the report of the Senate committee on the use of narcotics in Canada.

A bill will be introduced for the purpose of continuing the Canadian wheat board as the sole marketing agency for western wheat, oats and barley.

A measure will be laid before you to provide for the division of the national museum of Canada into two museums to be known as the Canadian museum of natural history and the Canadian museum of human history.

A revision of the Federal District Commission Act will be presented for your consideration.

Amendments of detail to a number of other acts will also be introduced.

Members of the House of Commons:

You will be asked to appropriate the funds required to maintain the services and payments provided under the authority of parliament.

Honourable Members of the Senate:

Members of the House of Commons:

May Divine Providence guide you in your deliberations.

Topic:   SPEECH FROM THE THRONE
Permalink

MOTION PROVIDING FOR CONSIDERATION LATER THIS DAY


Right Hon. L. S. St. Laurent (Prime Minister) moved: That the speech of His Excellency the Governor General to both houses of parliament be taken into consideration later this day.


LIB

Louis-René Beaudoin (Speaker of the House of Commons)

Liberal

Mr. Speaker:

Is it the pleasure of the house to adopt the motion?

Topic:   MOTION PROVIDING FOR CONSIDERATION LATER THIS DAY
Permalink
CCF

Stanley Howard Knowles (Whip of the Co-operative Commonwealth Federation)

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. Stanley Knowles (Winnipeg North Centre):

Before this motion carries, Mr. Speaker, may I ask the Prime Minister whether the government plans at any time to make a statement on or provide for a discussion of the present railway strike, and in that connection whether the government would consider tabling all documents in relation to this matter, including Senator Roebuck's minority report?

Topic:   MOTION PROVIDING FOR CONSIDERATION LATER THIS DAY
Permalink
LIB

Louis Stephen St-Laurent (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Mr. St. Laurent (Quebec East):

Mr. Speaker, the matter has been referred to in the speech from the throne and I think it is extremely apt to be dealt with in the debate that will take place on the speech from the throne. As to the production of papers, may I say that any papers in the possession of the Department of Labour can, I assume, be laid on the table for the information of hon. members.

Topic:   MOTION PROVIDING FOR CONSIDERATION LATER THIS DAY
Permalink

Motion agreed to.


SIR ROBERT BORDEN

January 8, 1957