January 17, 1957

LIB

Irvin William Studer

Liberal

Mr. Sluder:

Where would I get it?

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SC

Frederick Davis Shaw

Social Credit

Mr. Shaw:

Do not make the mistake that was made in the last provincial election. In my riding the president of the Alberta Liberal association went on the air and urged the electorate to support the president of the Alberta Progressive Conservative association, who happened to be a candidate in that constituency. It was one of the most fantastic things I have ever witnessed. I do not blame the Conservative candidate for accepting their support. I do not blame him for going on the air and thanking the president of the Alberta Liberal association for having done that. I think he felt that he owed them something.

I say to the hon. member for Swift Current-Maple Creek that instead of bothering and worrying himself over things about which he has not much knowledge, he should concentrate on trying to resolve some of these situations. Possibly Liberal candidates in western Canada may then become more acceptable to the general electorate. I trust

that our amendment will secure the support of the entire house. I think members of the house generally would be thanked by a large cross section of the Canadian public.

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LIB

Albert Peter Lavigne

Liberal

Mr. Albert Lavigne (Stormont):

Mr. Speaker, I wish to congratulate the hon. member for Edmonton-Strathcona (Mr. Hanna) who so ably moved the address in reply to the speech from the throne.

(Translation):

I also wish to congratulate sincerely the hon. member for Gloucester (Mr. Robichaud) who fulfilled his task so well in seconding the address in reply to the speech from the throne.

(Text):

To the hon. member for Prince Albert (Mr. Diefenbaker) I offer my sincere congratulations on his success within his party. I wish also to pay tribute to my predecessor who so ably represented the county of Stormont for close to 20 years and who today, as an employee of this government, is administering the business of the St. Lawrence seaway in a most efficient manner. We in Stormont are proud of his achievements, and I am sure that all Canadians will remember him for many years to come.

I am happy to note in the throne speech that it is the intention of the government to come to the aid of municipalities by authorizing payments of grants in lieu of taxes on federal properties receiving normal municipal services. I am sure the electors of Stormont who will benefit by this legislation will be forever grateful to this government.

I should like to thank the members of the house in the name of the people of my riding for passing legislation that will bring about favourable changes in the county of Stormont and the city of Cornwall. I am referring to the St. Lawrence seaway development that will bring to our boundaries ocean navigation and a power potential which, along with our labour pool and the future availability of natural gas delivered by Trans-Canada Pipe Lines, will make this area most advantageous for the establishment of industries which, I am sure, will find in our municipality cooperation and advantages unknown elsewhere.

I want to congratulate the Prime Minister and the Minister of Labour for their efforts in settling the recent railway strike.

In the northern part of the county of Stormont we have a group of people who earn their living by means of mixed farming, most of their products finding a market in the cities of Cornwall and Montreal. However, the county is known especially for the quantity and quality of its cheese production. For many years Stormont has been one of

The Address-Mr. Lavigne

the chief cheese-producing counties in Ontario, and from recent reports it is still in that category. In the matter of quality I should like to refer to the achievements of Mr. Harold Montgomery, who for the past two years has won trophies emblematic of the best entries in a commonwealth-wide competition. To the south we have the development of the St. Lawrence river and the power project, which stretches from the eastern extremity to the western boundary of the county.

We are in an area of great activity and prosperity. We have great confidence in the future development of our county. However, we find, like all other places which have experienced rapid development, that we lack certain transportation facilities which will be needed if we are to keep pace with our industrial potential. I am referring, Mr. Speaker, to airport and certain harbour facilities which will be urgently needed in this area.

I have no intention of dealing with the problems of all the industries in Cornwall and the surrounding area. May I acquaint you with the industries in this area and their products so you may know of the contribution which is being made to the national economy. Courtaulds (Canada) Limited manufacturer of rayon, artificial silk, and tenasco, a relatively new product that goes into the manufacture of tires and other allied products. We have the Howard Smith Paper Mills, Canadian Industries Limited, with whose products I think you are all familiar, Dominion Tar and Chemical "no-co-rode pipe", Kemkall-Bishop, citric acid, T.C.F., transparent cellulose film, Howards & Sons, chemicals, and many others whose products are sold locally.

In the city of Cornwall we have an important branch of the cotton industry. We have established in Cornwall Canadian Cottons and Dundas Mills, and more recently Dundas annex. Employed in this industry are an important number of citizens who have to work under the fear of a lay-off and under conditions inferior to others, because the industry has to compete with imports from subsidized and cheap labour countries.

Mr. Speaker, I wish to appeal, on behalf of the people who are employed in the cotton industry, to the government so they may live and work without fear of a lay-off at unexpected times, and so they may have better working conditions. I hope this matter will be given serious consideration and, if we are responsible for this situation let us rectify it so the cotton mill employees may enjoy the same privileges and the same security enjoyed in other industries.

(Translation):

Mr. Speaker, in deference to representations which have been made to me by a group of my constituents, I feel I should deal with the question of family allowances, a social security measure instituted by a Liberal government in 1945, and one whose benefits are well known.

In answer to those who insist upon a new increase in the basic allowance, I might say that the Liberal party having put forward this social security measure twelve years ago will know how to improve it in due course. However, the question is not without its importance since family allowances at the present time take up $400,000,000 out of the total annual budget.

Family allowances have not only raised the standard of living of our people, more particularly that of our large families, but they have stimulated Canadian economy by increasing the purchasing power of an incalculable number of Canadians without, on the other hand, constituting too heavy a load on taxpayers as a whole.

Since the institution of family allowances Canadians, especially those of the working classes, are better clothed, better fed and better housed. Moreover, the intellectual level of our people, thanks to greater educational possibilities, has been notably increased. It's all to the credit of the people of Canada, in the way of national culture.

It cannot be denied that the cost of living has greatly increased since 1945, when family allowances were brought in. Since then, there have been constant adjustments in wages and prices in general so it would probably be time to think of a new adjustment of family allowances.

Consequently, so that family allowances might again have the purchasing power they had in 1945, I urge the government to raise the amounts, and I do so on behalf of large families, which, as is well known, are not always the most privileged but are nonetheless the human potential on which rests the future of Canada. The government is duty-bound to think first of the human person whose natural surrounding is the family, the cell of society.

I should be very glad if that adjustment were made at this session and I do hope that the Minister of National Health and Welfare (Mr. Martin) will be able to implement that request from a representative who is mindful of the welfare of the families of his constituency.

(Text):

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PC

George Harris Hees

Progressive Conservative

Mr. George H. Hees (Broadview):

Mr. Speaker, since the appearance of the Gordon report a few days ago it has been seriously

The Address-Mr. Hees studied in all parts of the country. It represents a great deal of work, both on the part of the members of the commission and also by those who submitted briefs and who appeared before the commission. The report gives us an opportunity to have a look into what we might expect to see happen here in Canada during the next 25 years.

The main purpose of the government in setting up this commission and in having it make it's report just before a general election is to attempt to create in the minds of the public the idea that all the good things which the report forecasts will take place in the next 25 years, and will take place only if this government is returned to office.

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LIB

Jean Lesage (Minister of Northern Affairs and National Resources)

Liberal

Mr. Lesage:

It is the only way.

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PC

George Harris Hees

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Hees:

The report has been made close enough to the general election with the purpose in mind that the government can slip and slide around the tricky questions, and thus avoid answering whether it intends to implement any of the proposals contained in the report. Instead it can simply indicate during the election campaign that if the Liberal government is returned to office all of these things, and I mean all of them, will come to pass.

Therefore, Mr. Speaker, the purpose of this report is mainly political. It is, in short terms, election bait. It is a desperate attempt on the part of the government to cover up the many things which the government knows it should have done and has not done, by dangling before the eyes of the voting public the attractive vision of things which can be expected to come to pass some time in the next 25 years. It is going to be put to the voting public by liberal speakers on platforms from one end of this country to the other that all they have to do is vote Liberal, reelect this government, and these things will be done immediately.

I think, however, Mr. Speaker, that the voting public has become wise to the Liberal techniques. They know that what they are going to hear is nothing but the usual tripe, and that there is no basis in fact for what they are going to be told. The Liberal party will find in the next election that this form of approach falls like a lead balloon.

Now, of course, Mr. Speaker, anything that is detrimental to the government, such as its tight money policy, has been conveniently left out of this report. The fact that this policy is hamstringing the construction industry and denying to young married couples the homes they so desperately need in which to bring up their families, has been conveniently forgotten. There is also no mention of the fact that a great deal of unemployment and

many bankruptcies have been caused by this stupid policy which the government has insisted on pursuing.

Now, of course, it is well known that the chairman, Mr. Gordon, will soon be rewarded for the political chore which he has performed so well by being invited into the cabinet. Very soon we can expect him to take his place beside the other members of the cabinet as the new minister of defence production. The plan, of course, is that he will soon take over the complete portfolio of the present Minister of Trade and Commerce, and that is the bait that was used. It is too bad; I am sorry his term of office will be cut so short, because it is pretty well recognized by those who observe political matters closely that the term of office of this government will end on June 17 next.

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LIB

Colin Emerson Bennett (Parliamentary Assistant to the Minister of Veterans Affairs)

Liberal

Mr. Benneii:

Did you see the Gallup poll?

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PC

George Harris Hees

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Hees:

One thing this report does tell us is that during the next 25 years the consumption of power in this country will increase by three times. Because this government has no power or energy policy, this report has been very careful not to make any embarrassing suggestions of a specific kind as to what the government could and should do in order to assist the provinces develop this greatly enlarged quantity of power that will be needed. Since there is also no mention of any proposed legislation in the speech from the throne which will assist the provinces to develop power and natural resources within their borders, we must expect for the next few months a continuation of the government's do nothing, hope and grope policy in this regard.

Now, Mr. Speaker, you might well ask at this point, what should the government do? In New Brunswick it should start immediately -it should have started a long time ago-to assist Premier Hugh John Flemming to develop the half million potential horsepower on the Saint John river by backing his power development bonds and enabling him to obtain the money which he needs at a considerably lower rate of interest.

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LIB

Jean Lesage (Minister of Northern Affairs and National Resources)

Liberal

Mr. Lesage:

Will the hon. member permit a question?

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PC

George Harris Hees

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Hees:

Yes.

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LIB

Jean Lesage (Minister of Northern Affairs and National Resources)

Liberal

Mr. Lesage:

Is the hon. member aware that we are still waiting for the data on the possible storage on the Tobique river that we were promised by the government of New Brunswick some months ago in order to be in a position to make a decision on the request of that government?

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PC

George Harris Hees

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Hees:

My information is that you have had information on that subject for a long time.

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LIB

Jean Lesage (Minister of Northern Affairs and National Resources)

Liberal

Mr. Lesage:

Well, Mr. Speaker-

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PC

George Harris Hees

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Hees:

We differ. My information is that you have it.

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LIB

Jean Lesage (Minister of Northern Affairs and National Resources)

Liberal

Mr. Lesage:

I have not received it. I am the one who would know, and I have not received it.

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PC

George Harris Hees

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Hees:

Well, Mr. Speaker, we shall just have to agree to disagree, because my information is completely different.

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LIB

Jean Lesage (Minister of Northern Affairs and National Resources)

Liberal

Mr. Lesage:

I am the one who is supposed to receive it.

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PC

George Harris Hees

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Hees:

You are supposed to, but you do not seem to know.

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LIB

Jean Lesage (Minister of Northern Affairs and National Resources)

Liberal

Mr. Lesage:

I have not received anything.

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PC

George Harris Hees

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Hees:

As I was saying before I was so rudely interrupted, Mr. Speaker-

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January 17, 1957