November 19, 1957

PC
SC
PC
SC
SC

Ambrose A. Holowach

Social Credit

Mr. Holowach:

Our answer, Mr. Speaker, as I indicated before, is to make sure we reform our economic system and equate the purchasing power of our people with the productive power of this nation. We believe that parliament should have the power to determine a financial policy that will make it-

Topic:   LABOUR CONDITIONS
Subtopic:   UNEMPLOYMENT
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PC
SC

Ambrose A. Holowach

Social Credit

Mr. Holowach:

-obligatory for the banking system of this country to monetize the real wealth produced by the people of Canada so that the total income of our people will automatically be sufficient to equal the total market value of their production. That is our answer.

Topic:   LABOUR CONDITIONS
Subtopic:   UNEMPLOYMENT
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SC

Charles Edward Johnston

Social Credit

Mr. Johnston (Bow River):

What is wrong with that?

Topic:   LABOUR CONDITIONS
Subtopic:   UNEMPLOYMENT
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PC
?

An hon. Member:

The fact that you smile about it, that is what is wrong with it.

Topic:   LABOUR CONDITIONS
Subtopic:   UNEMPLOYMENT
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SC

Ambrose A. Holowach

Social Credit

Mr. Holowach:

With respect to whether or not unemployment is normal I would say the only thing normal about unemployment in a country such as Canada is that it is a normal consequence of faulty monetary policy condoned by the old line parties.

(Mr. Holowach.]

Let us look at the facts. Across this country homes are desperately needed. We are falling further behind in the job of providing Canadians with decent and low-cost homes. Let us face up to the fact that shortages in housing are causing many crises in family life. Just how stupid can we be? We have the unemployed manpower, the materials and the skills to fulfil the housing needs but under the prevailing tight money policies of the previous Liberal administration as well as the new Conservative government home starts are dropping sharply and layoffs in all fields of the construction industry are on the increase.

Roads and arterial highways are desperately needed across the country. Some 16 years ago we commenced constructing the trans-Canada highway, one single road across the nation and it is still in process of being completed today. How long do we have to wait before we start to build the other highways that are essential to the economy and defence of Canada? On repeated occasions I have drawn the attention of the government to the need of constructing additional trans-Canada highways and in particular a highway that would run from Winnipeg by way of Saskatoon, Edmonton, Jasper park and the Yellowhead route to the west coast. It is about time we did something in that regard.

Right across Canada there is the need of vast national undertakings and projects essential to the national interest which are physically possible and desirable. Let us consider for a moment the backlog of essential public facilities at the junior or municipal level of government. This backlog includes hospitals to restore the health of our people, schools to relieve the shortage of classrooms and sewerage and sanitation projects to meet the requirements of expanding communities. In the light of these needs it is nonsense to suggest that unemployment in Canada is unavoidable or inevitable. In fact the most amazing spectacle in our country today is that of underemployment.

May we ask this question: will this government which prides itself on being a new deal government possess the courage to implement fiscal policies which in their objectives will aim to make financially possible what we know is physically possible and desirable? If we are able to do this Canada can be built into a leading nation within our lifetime. The remedy calls for a full recognition of the role of comsumption in our economic system. If this is so, then we must overhaul our tax structure which has reached excessive and crushing proportions and is destroying

the buying power of the dollar as related to the consumption of goods. The government must also help in meeting the credit and mortgage needs of our people in order that they may acquire homes at reasonable terms. Furthermore, the needs of small and mediumsized businesses must be recognized by reducing the crushing tax load and loan restrictions which face them. These are the shots in the arm which our country needs if we are to expand production and alleviate unemployment.

In this discussion of labour and unemployment problems I feel strongly there is one problem perhaps more worthy of our attention than any other. I have in mind the problem of older people seeking work and the difficulties they encounter in this connection. These difficulties are compounded not only by the barriers that are set up against them in industry but also by the neglect in legislation. Many of these older people are healthy and active but because of their age the opportunity to earn is denied them. Whether business is good or bad no one wants to hire the older worker. Finding a solution to

this important problem of jobs for older people is a task for parliament, for industry and for the Department of Labour.

As a start I suggest the establishment of a fund and the institution of a program in the Department of Labour to help these people in the meantime by inducing priority in placement and to reduce the barriers erected against this worthy element of our society. I believe that to do this little bit is to do something that would at least give all of us a sense that we are participating in a positive action against manpower wastage as well as one of special humanitarian

significance.

Topic:   LABOUR CONDITIONS
Subtopic:   UNEMPLOYMENT
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AIR TRANSPORT

SERVICE UNDER BILATERAL AGREEMENTS

PC

Arthur Smith

Progressive Conservative

Mr. A. R. Smith (Calgary South):

Mr. Speaker, I would not have the opposition feel that a member of the government party did not have a grievance with the government.

Topic:   AIR TRANSPORT
Subtopic:   SERVICE UNDER BILATERAL AGREEMENTS
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LIB

James Allen (Jim) Byrne

Liberal

Mr. Byrne:

We are sure that yours will.

Topic:   AIR TRANSPORT
Subtopic:   SERVICE UNDER BILATERAL AGREEMENTS
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PC

Arthur Smith

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Smith (Calgary South):

What I have to raise is a grievance which I think affects every constituency but perhaps I may apply my particular reference to the area I know best if the house will grant me that liberty. I intend in a very few words to make reference to air regulations and bilateral agreements but not necessarily to air carriers. My grievance is, if I may state it at the beginning, the lack of proper consideration for Canadian landing points which of course are subject to the international bilateral agreements. I do not blame Trans-Canada Air Lines; in fact

Air Transport

I think I might even pay them a compliment to a certain extent. We have heard on a number of occasions in this house severe criticism of Trans-Canada Air Lines and even the question of its proposed sale has been raised, with which view I do not agree. As an active pilot and one who has flown on most airlines on this continent I would say that in so far as aircraft servicing and airline practices are concerned there is no finer airline in the world, bar none.

Topic:   AIR TRANSPORT
Subtopic:   SERVICE UNDER BILATERAL AGREEMENTS
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CCF

Stanley Howard Knowles (Whip of the Co-operative Commonwealth Federation)

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. Knowles (Winnipeg North Centre):

Hear, hear.

Topic:   AIR TRANSPORT
Subtopic:   SERVICE UNDER BILATERAL AGREEMENTS
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PC

Arthur Smith

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Smith (Calgary South):

Nevertheless, Mr. Speaker, I do agree with those who believe that it suffers from a rather sheltered position; and which very seriously affects its public relations.

In a paragraph or two I should like to urge upon the government the necessity of giving consideration to the problem of a number of communities which today are not serviced by any north-south connection and which, by their very nature, as I said initially, is regulated under the bilateral agreement and are influenced by what we regard as the cat-and-mouse game. The fact of the matter, Mr. Speaker, is that if you wish to initiate any possible landing right in one country or another you find that it involves a rather complicated agreement. The situation in Calgary is such-in fact, in the entire western area between Winnipeg and Vancouver- that we are not serviced to our southern cousins by anything other than one milk route. The net result is that a passenger- and there are a great many of them-who uses the south connection, such as it is, is forced to undergo a very lengthy layoff in one of two cities. In fact, it is nearly as fast to go by motor car or mule.

We in Calgary are in this position, and since it is applicable to a number of other centres, I would suggest that consideration be given to inviting the United States to reopen negotiations which admittedly have to date been conducted on a rather horsetrading basis in the past. I suggest that we point out to them that very large metropolitan centres are being denied free access by either Canadian or United States carriers. I am not concerned what carrier it might be purely because we are frightened to sit down around the negotiation table for fear that what we might gain on the one hand we would give away on the other. In the meantime those who are in the less populated areas have not the same influence and they suffer disastrously.

The city of Calgary is an example. It is a metropolitan centre which is naturally

Broadcasting Service

the headquarters of the oil industry. Because of the location of Calgary those personnel who wish to visit United States centres of industrial importance must go through Calgary. We have no airline route which would conceivably get them there directly unless they go into the city of Edmonton and take the northern route, or unless they take the bus in many instances and go to Lethbridge. It is interesting to note that 80 per cent of loadings for U.S. points from Alberta originate in Calgary, yet we have no service south. The net result is we have built up in the city of Calgary one of the biggest centres of private aviation of executive type aircraft that it is possible to have. Unfortunately, many of those people cannot afford this luxury and they have no hope of carrying out their business in an effective manner.

Therefore, my grievance, simply expressed, is this. Let us recognize that we are going to have to re-open the bilateral negotiations soon. Let us say that we are prepared to recognize that many of those areas-and particularly the constituency which I represent-have no service at all. Let us say to the United States that one of two carriers -two in particular in the United States- who are prepared to service Calgary should be permitted to come in unless some Canadian airline is permitted to give the same service. I hope, sir, that the government will consider this as a grievance because the problem is perhaps one of those which, from a convenience standpoint, is certainly most urgent.

(Translation):

Topic:   AIR TRANSPORT
Subtopic:   SERVICE UNDER BILATERAL AGREEMENTS
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REQUEST FOR EXTENSION OF BROADCASTING SERVICE

LIB

Charles-Noël Barbès

Liberal

Mr. C. N. Barbes (Chapleau):

Mr. Speaker, I have a grievance to put before the house. With your permission I would like to speak about radio and television service more particularly as it concerns the area which I represent in this house the constituency of Chapleau.

A number of listeners in the Abitibi area have expressed the wish to be provided with certain religious broadcasts such as Sunday mass and morning devotions at 7.30 each morning, through the private stations at La Sarre and Amos.

Radio is a social service which should satisfy the tastes and the needs of the public. As the people of Abitibi are 90 per cent French-speaking and Catholic, it would be well for the C.B.C. to insist that the private stations associated with the government network, such as those of the Radio-Nord Inc.

chain, provide their listeners with a good many additional broadcasts originating with the C.B.C. I make that suggestion also on behalf of listeners who are in poor health, old, crippled, or invalids. I know too that a great many people who have to look after numerous small children are unable to attend mass every Sunday because of the distance they live from the churches.

My request is also justified by section 21 of the Canadian Broadcasting Act (chapter 32 RSC). The broadcasting licences are defined as being a temporary and conditional alienation of an important and precious element of public wealth to the benefit of a group or a company.

The C.B.C. is empowered to set the periods during which a private station must carry network programs. Licence holders, especially those in private networks, who are thereby the sole broadcasters in an isolated area such as ours, have a duty to supply to the whole of their listening public the best programs of the French network.

As regards the radio program called "Morning Devotions", it is so varied and of such high quality that our people would like to enjoy it every day. It must not be replaced by songs or by music sometimes of a dubious if not bad taste. Would you agree, Mr. Speaker, to replace the daily prayer in the house by discussions relating to rock'n roll? Certainly not.

Private radio stations should at all times show themselves worthy of the licence that has been granted to them, and of the privilege of the exclusive use of the air, which is part of public property.

An effective way for the government to encourage a better standard of radio service in a given area consists in supplying that area with the additional service of the C.B.C., thereby giving listeners the opportunity to choose whichever program they prefer.

I favour private enterprise as long as it maintains for the benefit of the public a service always worthy of commendation.

I would like to add a few words, if I may, on a related subject. I assure you that, in the Abitibi area, we have long wanted to view the programs which the French television network has been broadcasting for the past five years in Canada. According to official reports supplied to us, 86 p. 100 of this country is now well covered in this field. We should like to have the same treatment in

the Chapleau constituency. We should like the advantages of French television service because this service would only be normal, I believe, in an area where the population is almost 90 p. 100 French-speaking. It is only fair to ask the government to offer us at least the French programs if it is too difficult to give us the benefit of both networks as is already the case for many other areas.

A private station, CKRN - TV in our neighbouring county of Villeneuve, should soon start its TV operations but will not cover the whole of my area. For that reason, I ask the government to supply us with the services of the national network in Chapleau. At Rouyn, in the county of Villeneuve, CKRN - TV will assign 50 p. 100 of its time to French programs. But this is not enough. What we want is a transmitting station for the benefit of the eastern part of Chapleau, Barraute, to Clova and Parent, an area more than 200 miles long which will not be reached by the Rouyn station.

Everywhere in Canada, the population insists on getting numerous programs of an irreproachable quality. People who know have said that C.B.C. compares favourably with other richer and more extensive networks. Canadians may no doubt be proud of the C.B.C., and it is exactly because we are 125,000 Canadians proud of the progress made by our country that we insist and wish to see, in our own homes, with our own eyes, the gigantic growth of Canada through the medium of radio and television. We need a service of this type for our entertainment but still more, no doubt, for education purposes. We need television, for instance, for all our bush workers and our mine workers who live very far from the cities and have no other means than radio to witness the gigantic growth of our country. We must open a window to children and our fellow citizens so that they may know each other better and have more reason to love Canada, a country of more than 16J millions of citizens who should have closer relations in order to achieve their goal, that is to live in good understanding, from one part of the country to the other.

To reach that goal, Mr. Speaker, it would be as necessary to supply all our fellow citizens with adequate radio and television services as to defend ourselves from external enemies who sometimes spread subversive propaganda.

Broadcasting Service

We recognize that our radar systems of warning, those for example of Parent and Senneterre, which have been set up at great cost, are useful even if one day we find that guided missiles could fall on us before the signal is given by telephone to the prime minister's office.

And as far as we are concerned, Mr. Speaker, we believe that the requested radio and TV service is as urgent and more important, for several reasons, than the broadcast of numerous international programs in sixteen or seventeen foreign languages to serve the Norwegians, the Swedes, the Danes, the Finns, the Dutch, the Italians, the Germans, the Austrians, the Czechs, the Russians, the Ukrainians, the Poles or others. It would be more urgent to offer this service to the French Canadians of northwestern Quebec who have none at all than to the peoples of Europe or Latin America who do not pay any taxes in Canada. Canadians have to pay for that. May the government then give, without any more delay, complete broadcast service in French or in the two languages so recently spoken by our very gracious sovereign, Her Majesty the Queen, when she visited Ottawa.

Admittedly the government finances an important part of television. Such being the case we would like the C.B.C. to set aside a part of the money it receives to create a system of relay towers which would bring T.V., by microwave over the Laurentians, beginning at Ottawa or Montreal, and reaching northward as far as the constituency of Chapleau. This should be done even at the expense of reducing broadcasts beamed towards Europe.

Let the C.B.C. create a high power station to serve Canadians in Chapleau. Some of the larger centres enjoy the two networks at the same time, which is all to the good. But, Mr. Speaker, we would at least like to have French language television service throughout our home area. I could add at this point that my constituents have already begun, in large numbers, to pay towards the cost of establishing such a telecommunication service by buying receiving sets which are liable to a special 15 per cent sales' tax the proceeds of which are handed over to the C.B.C. which uses them to establish new services.

If the government were to decide that the development in question would cost the C.B.C. too much at this time, do not forget that it would be in a better position to justify the maintenance costs of the radar system passing through Parent, Senneterre, and along the "Pinetree" line, if a picture transmission service were added to the latter. If the government really wishes to economize as claimed,

Broadcasting Service

it would be easy for the Minister of National Defence (Mr. Pearkes), the Minister of National Revenue (Mr. Nowlan) who has the C.B.C. in his care, and the other members of the government, to direct that the "Pine-tree" radar line be modified to transmit television pictures as far as Parent and Senne-terre, where radar stations are located and enable our people to receive the telecasts thus relayed. Some say that our defence and radio and television services are more or less kept in watertight compartments. Well, those are the very compartments which the government must open. Let us therefore hold a conference at the Parent station or, if it is preferable, at Senneterre, where the Gordian knot could easily be cut.

On behalf of all the people of my constituency, I therefore urge the federal government to take immediate action to achieve in the near future the two improvement and development suggestions which I have explained too rapidly here concerning radio and television broadcasting, particularly in the eastern part of my constituency.

After witnessing several days ago all that was done in order that our royal visitors could appear at the same time on the Canadian and American television networks, I am sure that, if the government will only give favourable consideration to our requests, everything will be in operation very shortly.

In a few weeks the C.B.C. has done wonders, and I commend those who have directly or indirectly taken part in this gigantic operation, which made it possible for us to see Her Majesty the Queen of Canada, and thus admire and respect her the more.

Unfortunately, the children of my district have, generally speaking, not been able to see Queen Elizabeth. We should not wait any longer; it is time to act and the whole population of Chapleau is anxious to see this project carried out.

It is true that the networks have cost many million dollars last year; five million people have seen live broadcasts of our great hockey games. And, as soon as the winter season begins, we, in my riding of Chapleau and elsewhere, also want to see all the hockey games and all the educational programs, which the C.B.C. may broadcast every day. The project is feasible, if the government really wants to give us the improvements I request and which the people of my county of Chapleau entirely approve.

(Text):

Topic:   REQUEST FOR EXTENSION OF BROADCASTING SERVICE
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November 19, 1957