December 13, 1957

RAILWAYS, CANALS AND TELEGRAPH LINES


Ninth report of standing committee on railways, canals and telegraph lines.-Mr. Fraser.


EXTERNAL AFFAIRS

EXTENSION OF GOOD WISHES TO CANADIAN


On the orders of the day:


LIB

Louis Stephen St-Laurent (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Liberal

Right Hon. L. S. Si. Laurent (Leader of the Opposition):

Mr. Speaker, may I take a moment or two at this time to express on behalf of all the members of the official opposition our good wishes to the Prime Minister and his colleagues the Minister of Finance and the Minister of National Defence who, I believe, will be leaving early this evening to attend the extraordinary council meeting of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization in Paris next week. I can assure the Prime Minister and his colleagues that these good wishes are very sincere and I have no doubt that they are shared by every member of this house-

Topic:   EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
Subtopic:   EXTENSION OF GOOD WISHES TO CANADIAN
Sub-subtopic:   DELEGATES TO FORTHCOMING MEETING
Permalink
?

Some hon. Members:

Hear, hear.

Topic:   EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
Subtopic:   EXTENSION OF GOOD WISHES TO CANADIAN
Sub-subtopic:   DELEGATES TO FORTHCOMING MEETING
Permalink
LIB

Louis Stephen St-Laurent (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Liberal

Mr. St. Laurent (Quebec East):

-regardless of party affiliations and generally by the people of Canada.

Of course these good wishes extend also to the Secretary of State for External Affairs who, I understand, had to leave a little earlier and who by this time has probably already reached his first destination.

Naturally these good wishes include the very hearty and confident hopes that the Prime Minister and the members of his party will have a comfortable and safe journey and will be back in our midst at the time fixed in their schedule. Those personal wishes come from the esteem and friendship which the members of this house have for the Prime Minister and his colleagues who will be representing Canada on this important occasion.

We all realize, of course, how important to the members of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization is this special meeting and, as the Prime Minister reminded the house

on Wednesday in the exchange of questions and answers recorded in Hansard of that day, the character of the meeting probably arises from the earlier meeting of the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom and the President of the United States a few weeks ago. The Prime Minister added:

It also arises from the realization that the recent scientific advances on the part of the U.S.S.R. have called for an intensified examination of NATO and its principles, to the end that it may advance to the future stronger than ever before in its purposes and in its aims.

There are, no doubt, many difficult and complex problems which will be the object of consideration at this meeting. We understand the heads of the governments of most of the member countries will be present. I am not going to refer any more to these difficulties, because that would not serve any useful purpose at this time, but we have had an example of their number and complexity in these exchanges which have taken place from time to time in the House of Commons, and the Prime Minister said on Wednesday that as to the furtherance and extension of the application of article 2 of the North Atlantic treaty he felt he would be speaking with the approval of the members of the house.

I think I can say in a general but very sincere way that the Prime Minister may feel that he and his colleagues will have behind them the support of all the members of this house and of the public generally in their efforts to promote what has been the usual attitude of Canada as a middle power in its endeavours to smooth out the disagreements which are bound to arise from time to time between the leaders of countries engaged in a common pursuit, disagreements which are certainly overweighed by the general desire of all the members of the organization, their governments and peoples, to promote and try to secure peace in the world.

They will be doing this at a time when we are all reminded of the age-old promise of peace in the world to men of good will.

Topic:   EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
Subtopic:   EXTENSION OF GOOD WISHES TO CANADIAN
Sub-subtopic:   DELEGATES TO FORTHCOMING MEETING
Permalink
CCF

Major James William Coldwell

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. M. J. Coldwell (Roselown-Biggar):

Mr. Speaker, may I join the Leader of the Opposition in expressing good wishes to the Prime Minister and the members of his party who are attending this very important conference in Paris. There are times when party differences are put aside and we can be unanimous

NATO-Paris Conference in our good wishes, and this is especially so in connection with a conference of this nature.

I think in all probability this organization has never met with the eyes of so many people upon it as at the present time. I was very glad to hear the Secretary of State for External Affairs say the other day that some way must be found of negotiating with those with whom we have been at variance over the years in order that the world may be protected from the threat of destruction which has been hanging over it for so long.

The North Atlantic Treaty Organization, I remember well, was first suggested at the United Nations by the Leader of the Opposition. I was a member of the Canadian delegation when that proposal was made at the United Nations assembly in 1946, and there is one feature of it which I hope the Prime Minister and his colleagues will stress, namely article 2, for economic co-operation. I believe more can be done to unite the western nations by article 2 than by any other means.

All we hope is that our delegation will be able to promote peace among the nations of the world, and I can assure the Prime Minister that we wish him and the delegation every success in the great undertaking in which they will be engaged next week. I know, as the Leader of the Opposition has said, that this feeling is shared not only by everyone in this House of Commons but by the people in every part of Canada.

Topic:   EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
Subtopic:   EXTENSION OF GOOD WISHES TO CANADIAN
Sub-subtopic:   DELEGATES TO FORTHCOMING MEETING
Permalink
SC

Solon Earl Low

Social Credit

Mr. Solon E. Low (Peace River):

Mr. Speaker, I am sure it will not require a multiplication of words to add my good wishes to the expressions of good will which the Prime Minister and his colleagues have received from all sides of the house on leaving to take part in this summit conference in Paris. I can only say that those speakers who have preceded me spoke words which are in my own heart and mind.

I should also like to say that the circumstances at this time are unusual. These are dangerous times, and it seems to me they will require an unusual amount of co-operation among the nations which are now called the free nations of the world. If this NATO meeting can result in an extension of the application of article 2 in such a manner as to bring about this unusual measure of cooperation, I think we can see some life at the other end of the tunnel. I believe representatives of the nations attending this meeting must go to unusual lengths in seeking ways of removing fear, because I believe that today fear is the greatest cause of world tension.

I believe the place to start is with ourselves and the way we work with other nations and treat other nations. I also believe that there is more reason today to play the game with the utmost honesty, in the first place, than ever before and if our delegation can give leadership at the NATO conference in that respect and on a high moral plane I am satisfied the results will be good. Our best wishes go with them.

Right Hon. J. G. Diefenbaker (Prime

Minister): Mr. Speaker, I need not say how deeply grateful I am to have the expression of the viewpoint of the right hon. Leader of the Opposition and the leaders of the C.C.F. and Social Credit parties. This is one of those times when in a spirit of unity the House of Commons demonstrates the true relationship between members of various political parties that is of the essence of parliamentary government and the preservation of freedom as we see it. Indeed, what has been said here this morning is indicative of the strength of our system, which permits strong and definite opinions being expressed regarding those matters which separate us while at the same time maintaining not only the amenities but the friendships that exist among those who although they represent different viewpoints are united in their common dedication to the worth-while things of life.

As I speak for my colleagues and myself, may I say how much what has been said here today will mean to us in the days that are ahead as we meet with the representatives of the other 14 countries composing NATO, not in an aggressive attitude, not in a belligerent attitude, but in a realization that only in the maintenance of our undivided unity and in dissolving those things that separate us from time to time will freedom truly be preserved.

When reference was made to the fact that the Leader of the Opposition first raised this question of unity in the free world it brought to me a feeling of pride as a Canadian that the idea and concept should have been first introduced at an international meeting by one of those within this parliament who still occupies a high position in the deliberations of our country. There is no one, I am sure, who realizes more than I that in recent months, indeed in the last year and a half or two years, certain profound differences have arisen among members of NATO.

There is nothing unhealthy or abnormal in that fact. Communist countries are able to deny the beneficial effect of criticism or disagreement. We know there have been difficulties and disagreements, and my hope is that this conference, playing as it does an important role in providing a forum for consultation, will achieve that unity of purpose

to which I have already alluded, that rededication to principles upon which NATO had its beginnings, the redeclaration of its aims and purposes, so that we shall be able among the forces of freedom to advance into the sombre days of the future once again realizing that we have established a unity beneficial to the maintenance of peace. Indeed, without it peace cannot be assured.

We should not exaggerate our difficulties nor our problems. That we can meet at this time and that the heads of the various states will be able to meet indicates that the alliance retains its basic strength and vitality, that its principles still retain a basic similarity of point of view.

There is one thing that I think we must make clear, and that has been made clear this morning. NATO has no aggressive purpose. Mention was made of the need to dissipate fear in the world as a major element in preserving peace. At this meeting I hope it will again be made abundantly clear that this is a defence alliance; that the basic purpose of NATO is to deter aggression and to preserve peace. That is the attitude of this parliament as I see it today.

A prime minister's responsibility, and the responsibility of those associated with him, must always be so to speak as to convey to other nations what has been the traditional position of Canada, a middle power exerting its influence, as the Leader of the Opposition said, among other nations joined with us who have their disagreements-disagreements which are natural-and do those things which we believe are necessary.

My hope is that out of this NATO meeting will come that new spirit which is expected not only by the peoples of the free world, but also by men and women of good will everywhere. Our purpose will be to make the contribution, however small, that is available to us to bring about the achievement of what the Leader of the Opposition said, peace on earth to men of good will.

Topic:   EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
Subtopic:   EXTENSION OF GOOD WISHES TO CANADIAN
Sub-subtopic:   DELEGATES TO FORTHCOMING MEETING
Permalink

INDONESIA


On the orders of the day:


PC

John George Diefenbaker (Prime Minister)

Progressive Conservative

Right Hon. J. G. Diefenbaker (Prime Minister):

As numbers of relatives of Canadians in Indonesia have been endeavouring through this department to secure information with regard to their relatives located there, I feel that a statement at this time might clarify the situation.

The information received from our various diplomatic missions abroad indicates that the position of Dutch nationals and Dutch interests in Indonesia has not yet been clarified, although it is evident that many Dutch

Inquiries of the Ministry nationals resident in Indonesia are being encouraged to leave. Our embassy in Djakarta has reported that there is no immediate threat to non-Dutch nationals or interests, as armed security enforcement by the Indonesian army remains reasonably good. One hundred and thirteen Canadians are registered with our embassy in Djakarta as residents of Indonesia. About 30 of these are with the United States oil companies in Sumatra, 30 with the embassy, Colombo plan and other foreign aid dispensing agencies, and the remainder are mostly missionaries. I should like to repeat that no measures have been taken against Canadian nationals and no evacuation of Canadians is now contemplated. However, if evacuation becomes necessary, emergency procedures to achieve this end have already been planned.

Topic:   EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
Subtopic:   INDONESIA
Sub-subtopic:   STATEMENT AS TO POSITION OF CANADIAN NATIONALS
Permalink

PROPOSED ESTABLISHMENT OF NEUTRAL


On the orders of the day:


CCF

Major James William Coldwell

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. M. J. Coldwell (Roseiown-Biggar):

Mr. Speaker, may I direct a question to the Prime Minister. I am going to try to put the question in such a way as not to embarrass him, and he will understand that I am not trying to embarrass him in any way. I will put it this way. May I hope that the Prime Minister and his delegation will give sympathetic consideration to the proposal for the establishment of a neutral zone, particularly for atomic weapons, as suggested by two countries, I believe, namely Poland and Czechoslovakia and which is somewhat in line with the proposal made by Sir Anthony Eden in 1955. May I express the hope that sympathetic consideration will be given to that matter.

Topic:   EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
Subtopic:   PROPOSED ESTABLISHMENT OF NEUTRAL
Sub-subtopic:   ZONE FOR ATOMIC WEAPONS
Permalink
PC

John George Diefenbaker (Prime Minister)

Progressive Conservative

Right Hon. J. G. Diefenbaker (Prime Minister):

Mr. Speaker, the attitude of the Canadian delegation will be to give the fullest consideration to every proposal which is made and which has as its purpose the amelioration of the present tensions. The suggestion of my hon. friend will certainly receive that sympathetic consideration.

Topic:   EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
Subtopic:   PROPOSED ESTABLISHMENT OF NEUTRAL
Sub-subtopic:   ZONE FOR ATOMIC WEAPONS
Permalink

LABOUR CONDITIONS

BRITISH COLUMBIA


On the orders of the day:


December 13, 1957