February 23, 1961

STANDING ORDERS


Fourth report of standing committee on standing orders-Miss Aitken.


PRESENCE IN GALLERY OF MEMBERS OF U.S. CONGRESS

PC

John George Diefenbaker (Prime Minister)

Progressive Conservative

Right Hon. J. G. Diefenbaker (Prime Minister):

From time immemorial it has been a convention in accordance with British parliamentary tradition that no one is permitted within the precincts of the House of Commons except the members, the reason being, as Your Honour knows, that in the days of Charles I and prior thereto, if there was anyone of distinction or power present in the gallery the freedom of members of parliament to speak was, to say the least, circumscribed if not denied. That tradition survives today in the fiction that there is no one present at any time in the galleries of the House of Commons.

Nevertheless, these fears of intimidation on this occasion, however distinguished the delegation, do not prevent me-and I hope the house will not deny me-the privilege and opportunity of welcoming the members of the United States Senate and House of Representatives who are in this city meeting with the parliamentary representatives of Canada. The agenda is an important one dealing with such matters as foreign affairs, defence, and economic problems which activate each of our nations. The relationship between our countries, long one of the closest in the world, is represented officially by such organizations as the international joint commission and the permanent joint board on defence and, on the cabinet level by the committee on joint defence and the committee on trade and economic questions.

These members of the United States congress who are with us today bring to us the strength, the vigour and the knowledge of the co-operation which prevails between our two countries. I for one, many years ago, advocated in this chamber the need of bringing together representatives of the United States and Canada, and I was joined in that opinion by the hon. member for

Laurier. In the intervening years those meetings were not achieved, except through the parliamentary group of the commonwealth parliamentary association, until 1958. Since then there have been these exchanges between parliamentarians of our countries which mean so much to each of us, joined together not only geographically but in the mind and soul for the maintenance and preservation of freedom.

Our interdependence cannot be achieved without mutual awareness. There will be problems. There have been problems. We solve them through the instrumentality of discussion and agreement. The removal of misunderstandings is a continuing task with us. We do this in the broad and harmonious perspective of understanding. Unofficial though this organization is, it has already contributed much to understanding between oui countries and the solution of problems which have risen, and I know that that function will continue in the years ahead.

It is therefore my privilege as Prime Minister, through you, sir, to extend to Senatoi Aiken as chairman of the visiting group o: senators and congressmen the thanks of the Canadian parliament for their visit with us, coupled with the warmest welcome that we can accord to those with whom we are united in sentiment and dedication.

Topic:   PRESENCE IN GALLERY OF MEMBERS OF U.S. CONGRESS
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LIB

Lester Bowles Pearson (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Liberal

Hon. L. B. Pearson (Leader of the Opposition):

Mr. Speaker, it gives me very special pleasure to join with the Prime Minister on behalf of the official opposition in the welcome he has extended to our guests from the United States. To adapt that expression of the seventeenth century which the Prime Minister mentioned as one inspiring intimidation, we might say in this case "We spy friends".

This joint committee of the United States congress and the Canadian parliament is, as the Prime Minister has said, playing an increasingly useful part in examining into and strengthening the good relations between our two countries, helping to keep the neighbourhood fences in good repair, a result that does not just happen of itself.

In Canada, relations with our neighbour have been a major concern of ours ever since we became a nation, and indeed before that. The problems arising out of those relations are nothing new; yet we have always, at least in this century, managed to settle our difficulties in a manner which reflects the

Congress Members in Gallery genuine friendship and underlying good will between our two peoples. Perhaps it is well to recall this at this time in order to keep problems in perspective and to remind ourselves of the deeper and more important things that bind us together in a dangerous world.

Senator Aiken, who is a member of the United States delegation and whom we all know, respect and admire, said the other day that the United States and Canada cannot differ too much because our interests are "hopelessly interlocked". They are also, I believe, "hopefully" interlocked. Co-operation between us in defence, in trade and in everything else is essential. There will be honest differences among us in Canada as to the best methods for achieving co-operation in a changing world, but there will be no differences between us as to the necessity for such co-operation and the necessity for working together in an effort to promote progress, peace and security in the world today with justice and freedom for all.

Topic:   PRESENCE IN GALLERY OF MEMBERS OF U.S. CONGRESS
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CCF

Hazen Robert Argue

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. Hazen Argue (Assiniboia):

Mr. Speaker, I am pleased to join with the Prime Minister and Leader of the Opposition in welcoming to our galleries the distinguished representatives from the United States Senate and House of Representatives. In the past I have had the good fortune of being a member of the Canadian part of this joint interparliamentary group, and I can say that in those initial discussions I believe we had a frank exchange of views. I believe that the establishment of this group can and should lead to a better understanding between our nations.

It would not be frank on my part, Mr. Speaker, if I did not say that in view of the C.C.F.-New Party there are major outstanding differences between our two nations with regard to trade, economic, defence and other problems; but we are convinced that with clear and frank discussion, with an honest effort to settle those differences, we can make progress in building democracy, freedom and prosperity.

Our rules are not the same-we find that out every day-as the rules governing debate in the United States congress. Under our rules we are not able to give the same kind of extended welcome that some of us have received on the floor of the United States Senate; none the less, under our procedures where we have party representation, we can say to our distinguished friends that they receive today a unanimous welcome from the Canadian House of Commons.

Topic:   PRESENCE IN GALLERY OF MEMBERS OF U.S. CONGRESS
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EXTERNAL AFFAIRS

PC

John George Diefenbaker (Prime Minister)

Progressive Conservative

Right Hon. J. G. Diefenbaker (Prime Minister):

I hope the spirit of unanimity will continue after I have finished. Now, sir, I wish to announce that the Prime Minister of Greece, Mr. Karamanlis, has accepted an invitation to pay an official visit to Ottawa. His visit is planned for April 13 and 14; the details of that visit are to be announced later on.

We welcome him as a representative of one of our NATO allies and of a people who have made a great contribution to Canada in the years in which they have been among our citizens.

Topic:   PRESENCE IN GALLERY OF MEMBERS OF U.S. CONGRESS
Subtopic:   EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
Sub-subtopic:   ANNOUNCEMENT OF VISIT OF PRIME MINISTER OF GREECE
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PC

John George Diefenbaker (Prime Minister)

Progressive Conservative

Right Hon. J. G. Diefenbaker (Prime Minister):

The hon. member for Bonavista-Twillingate, on a number of occasions last week, asked for the tabling of the exchange of correspondence with the premiers of the provinces in connection with the dominion-provincial conference being held today and tomorrow. With the leave of the house I will table this correspondence now.

Topic:   PRESENCE IN GALLERY OF MEMBERS OF U.S. CONGRESS
Subtopic:   EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
Sub-subtopic:   DOMINION-PROVINCIAL CONFERENCE TABLING OF CORRESPONDENCE WITH PREMIERS
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LIB

John Whitney Pickersgill

Liberal

Mr. Pickersgill:

Will the Prime Minister ask to have the letters printed in Hansard, as is customary?

Topic:   PRESENCE IN GALLERY OF MEMBERS OF U.S. CONGRESS
Subtopic:   EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
Sub-subtopic:   DOMINION-PROVINCIAL CONFERENCE TABLING OF CORRESPONDENCE WITH PREMIERS
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PC

John George Diefenbaker (Prime Minister)

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Diefenbaker:

The hon. gentleman suggests that they be printed as an appendix to Hansard. If that is agreeable to the house, it is acceptable.

Topic:   PRESENCE IN GALLERY OF MEMBERS OF U.S. CONGRESS
Subtopic:   EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
Sub-subtopic:   DOMINION-PROVINCIAL CONFERENCE TABLING OF CORRESPONDENCE WITH PREMIERS
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PC

Daniel Roland Michener (Speaker of the House of Commons)

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Speaker:

Does the house give unanimous consent to the printing of the letters just tabled as an appendix to today's Hansardl

Topic:   PRESENCE IN GALLERY OF MEMBERS OF U.S. CONGRESS
Subtopic:   EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
Sub-subtopic:   DOMINION-PROVINCIAL CONFERENCE TABLING OF CORRESPONDENCE WITH PREMIERS
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?

Some hon. Members:

Agreed.

[Editor's Note: For correspondence referred to above, see appendix.l

Topic:   PRESENCE IN GALLERY OF MEMBERS OF U.S. CONGRESS
Subtopic:   EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
Sub-subtopic:   DOMINION-PROVINCIAL CONFERENCE TABLING OF CORRESPONDENCE WITH PREMIERS
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UNITED NATIONS

CANADIAN DELEGATION TO RESUMED GENERAL ASSEMBLY

PC

John George Diefenbaker (Prime Minister)

Progressive Conservative

Righi Hon. J. G. Diefenbaker (Prime Minister):

Mr. Speaker, I wish now to announce the composition of the Canadian delegation to the resumed session of the United Nations general assembly on March 7. The Canadian delegation will be led, of course, by the Secretary of State for External Affairs (Mr. Green). The vice-chairman will be the parliamentary secretary to the Secretary of State for External Affairs, the hon. member for Oxford (Mr. Nesbitt). The remaining delegates and alternate delegates will be drawn

entirely from the group who served during the first half of the general assembly session last fall. Arrangements are being made for parliamentary observers to attend. While I am unable at the moment to give their names, they will be drawn, as usual, two from this side of the house and one from each of the opposition parties.

The delegation will be slightly smaller than for a regular session because the assembly disposed of a major portion of its business before it recessed at Christmas. Three of the assembly's main committees have already completed their work, and the delegation to the resumed session is to deal with the work of the remaining four committees.

The delegation will in fact consist of Senator Blois from the other place, the hon. member for Calgary South, the hon. member for Charlevoix and, from the Department of External Affairs, General Burns, the government's disarmament adviser, Mr. C. S. A. Ritchie, the Canadian permanent representative to the United Nations, and Mr. Morley Scott.

The Canadian government for its part hopes that the renewed debates may serve to improve the international atmosphere and that progress will be made particularly on the problem of disarmament.

Topic:   UNITED NATIONS
Subtopic:   CANADIAN DELEGATION TO RESUMED GENERAL ASSEMBLY
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O.E.C.D.-APPROVAL OF CONVENTION AND RELATED AGREEMENTS


On the order: Government notices of motions: February 21-The Prime Minister-the following proposed resolution:- That it is expedient that the houses of parliament do approve the convention on the organization for economic co-operation and development, supplementary protocol No. 1 to the convention on the organization for economic co-operation and development, supplementary protocol No. 2 to the convention on the organization for economic co-operation and development, and the memorandum of understanding on the application of article XV of the convention on the organization for economic co-operation and development, all of which were signed in Paris on December 14, 1960; and that this house do approve the above agreements.


PC

Daniel Roland Michener (Speaker of the House of Commons)

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Speaker:

Pursuant to section 2 of standing order 21 this government notice of motion is transferred to and ordered for consideration under government orders at the next sitting of the house.

Topic:   O.E.C.D.-APPROVAL OF CONVENTION AND RELATED AGREEMENTS
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February 23, 1961