February 26, 1901 (9th Parliament, 1st Session)

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The POSTMASTER GENERAL.

With regard to an improved system of handling parcels, we are now establishing parcel post boxes, and we are endeavouring to make use of the automobile system to facilitate the collection and distribution of mail matter, including, of course, parcels. Last fall we bought two or three locomobiles, aud we are having made six quadracycles for the city of Toronto. With reference to postal notes and money orders, I cannot say that we are considering at the present moment the subject of abolishing either one or the other, or amalgamating the two classes of service. They are very different in their character. The postal note is for the transmission of small sums not exceeding $5, and is somewhat in the nature of a check. The money order is a different thing altogether, the name of the payee not appearing on the face of it, and the order not being payable except to the person named in the advice note which is sent by the postmaster who issues the order to the postmaster on whom the order is made. Whether in time they can be united into *one document remains to be seen. In the United States, they are getting up an order
now that looks very much like a fusion of the postal note and the money order. A few months ago an officer of the United States postal department came to Canada and had an interview with our officers on the subject of a free interchange of money orders, and negotiations are now going on with the view of facilitating that 'business. They have sent to us a form of order, which looks to me very much like a fusion of the postal note and money order. They have no postal notes, and their money order differs very materially from ours ; and as ours has been in force in its present form so many years, I hesitate to make any material change by abolishing it and adopting instead something like the postal note or check payable to the person named in the face of the document itself.

Topic:   SUPPLY-THE CORONATION OATH.
Subtopic:   VISIT OF THEIR ROYAL HIGHNESSES THE DUKE AND DUCHESS OF CORNWALL AND YORK.
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