April 5, 1918 (13th Parliament, 1st Session)

UNION

John Allister Currie

Unionist

Mr. CURRIE:

As one who has taken a
little part in the war, and whose whole heart is in the successful prosecution of the war, I desire to see that out brave troops at the front are 'Supported in every possible way. As I sat in the House last session there often occurred to me the words of Robert Louis Stevenson in one of his famous essays, (where Jhe said that the greatest lies are 'told in -silence. I heard things said in this House, which, had they been uttered outside, and I had ibeen free from any responsibility in 'connection with voluntary service, I would have denounced as untruths. But noiw the Military Service Act is in operation and we axe taking men for the war under the form of conscription, and the lips of men in this House and in the country need no longer be still for fear of injuring voluntary recruiting. I have made it my rule of conduct, and I am going to continue to do so from now on to the end of the war, that in iany action or matter that- comes before this House, or is raised outside, to first ask myself the question whether il should take a certain course which might be pleasing to the enemy, or adopt anobbeT .course which would be the opposite of that, and which would be in the interests of my country. So that I say in whai; I am going to do I am adopting the motto of Saint Gregory, " Better a scandal than a lie."
Now this question might not have come before the House at -all. A little bit of rioting might not have! Mattered very much, 'but -what do we find? 'The condition of affairs as far as this war is concerned- 'because this country is at war and at war very seriously, although a great many people do not realize it-the condition of affairs

Topic:   THE QUEBEC DISTURBANCES.
Subtopic:   MOTION OF MR. J. A. CURRIE FOR LEAVE TO ADJOURN THE HOUSE TO DISCUSS.
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