April 5, 1918 (13th Parliament, 1st Session)

UNION

John Allister Currie

Unionist

Mr. CURRIE:

What did we have to do? We had to deprive men of the vote, because we wished this to be a British country. We know very well that if the Opposition party had won the election contest, the men from the provinces who voted on the referendum in favour of conscription would be conscripted, and those who voted against

conscription would not be conscripted. That was the question that was up at the last election. Well, we went before the electors, and the electors endorsed the Military Service Act and everything that we did. The men of other parts of the country have been conscripted; they have carried on under the law, with very few complaints. But in the province of Quebec every effort has been put forth to prevent the law from going into effect and to keep the men from going to the war.
I would not have brought this question forward to-day did I not feel that unless [DOT]some drastic steps are taken-'more drastic even than have 'been mentioned in the House to-day-Quebec will not be conscripted until after the war. Let me tell you, Mr. Speaker, why I say that. Up to the present time the province of Quebec has given only 5,000 men under the Military Service Act, and of that number fully 3,500 are English-speaking. So that our Frenchspeaking friends, who should' be the first to stand loyally by us, have given only

Topic:   THE QUEBEC DISTURBANCES.
Subtopic:   MOTION OF MR. J. A. CURRIE FOR LEAVE TO ADJOURN THE HOUSE TO DISCUSS.
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