Donald MacBeth KENNEDY

KENNEDY, Donald MacBeth

Personal Data

Party
United Farmers of Alberta
Constituency
Peace River (Alberta)
Birth Date
August 21, 1884
Deceased Date
September 25, 1957
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Donald_MacBeth_Kennedy
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=03da0b4c-77ad-4cb8-9e3f-da86c8a69182&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
farmer

Parliamentary Career

December 6, 1921 - September 5, 1925
PRO
  Edmonton West (Alberta)
October 29, 1925 - July 2, 1926
PRO
  Peace River (Alberta)
September 14, 1926 - May 30, 1930
UFA
  Peace River (Alberta)
July 28, 1930 - August 14, 1935
UFA
  Peace River (Alberta)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 1 of 336)


July 4, 1935

Mr. KENNEDY (Peace River):

I am glad the hon). member has made that point because I followed him very carefully and I got the impression that he was trying to indicate that this wheat must go on the market under greater pressure than has been exerted during the last few years. I think he indicated that very definitely. I am against such a policy as I am of the opinion that the wheat has been put on the market as fast as it could have been without bringing ruin to the producers.

Another suggestion was that it should be for one year only. I do not know if that meant that we could get rid of this surplus in one year and I shall not place that interpretation upon it. Notwithstanding the fact that the world's surplus is decreasing and that Canada's holdings are decreasing I do not believe that we can dispose of our surplus in one year. You cannot separate the surplus from the general crop as they must be both marketed in the same market. If we could ship our surplus to China or to Mars, it would be a separate problem to that raised by future crops, but we cannot do that. Our surplus is part of the same problem and it must be handled in the same way. There is a reasonably hopeful situation in the world to-day so far as wheat is concerned as a result of the policies which have been put into effect but I do not think this situation can be cleaned up in one year. As far as I am concerned I am opposed absolutely to ahy suggestion that this is emergency legislation for one year only.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   CANADIAN GRAIN BOARD
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July 4, 1935

Mr. KENNEDY (Peace River):

I ask the question because my hon. friend has said something about a fair price. My question is this: Is there any provision in the bill, except a hope, that the minimum price shall be a fair price?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   CANADIAN GRAIN BOARD
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July 4, 1935

Mr. KENNEDY (Peace River):

Is there any provision in the bill that ensures that the minimum price will be a fair price?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   CANADIAN GRAIN BOARD
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July 4, 1935

Mr. KENNEDY (Peace River):

I want to continue it. The wheat surplus became dangerous according to reports about 1929-30. The wheat surplus was gradually accumulating from 1924. It did not become really noticeable until we saw those tremendous efforts at deflation, and intense protectionism spreading throughout the world, and the cutting off of credits to Germany and other European countries in 1929 and 1930. The wheat surplus rose from 471 million bushels in 1921, which

Grain Board

was the approximate wheat stocks in important areas in that year, to 904 million bushels in 1931. That was the world surplus, and it went later to over one billion bushels. I understand, Mr. Chairman, that that surplus has been coming down at about the same rate as it went up, and' that we are holding in Canada a little less this year than we did last year up to the first of August and a little less last year and the year before, if I remember correctly. So it seems to me that the world wheat situation is not such a hopeless proposition as has been stated. The increases in the surplus went up at the rate of about 40 million bushels a year from 1921 to 1931. They are coming down at about the same rate by decreases in acreage and from various other causes.

I hold in my hand the monthly bulletin of agricultural statistics for May, 1935, and at page 152 is shown the world's visible supply of wheat and) flour, and the source of these figures is BroomhalFs. The table gives the figures of the visible supply on April 1 for each year from 1932 to 1935, as follows:

World's Visible Supply of Wheat and Flour

April 1, 1932

595,830,000April 1, 1933

577,640,000April 1, 1934

532,980.000April 1, 1935

445,599,000

From 1921 to 1931 the world surplus piled up, and I have these statistics from the report of the imperial economic committee on the wheat situation, 1931: In 1921 the surplus increased 31 million bushels; in 1922 it '*'"creased. 46 million bushels, in 1923 it increased 117 million bushels, in 1924 it . decreased 159 million bushels, in 1925 it increased 63 million bushels; in 1926 it increased 69 million bushels; in 1927 it increased 69 million bushels; in 1928 it increased 68 million bushels; in 1929 it decreased 49 million bushels, and in 1930 it increased 95 million bushels. The decreases are as follows: 1932-33, 18 million bushels; 1933-34. 44 million bushels; 1934-35. 87 million bushels. Those figures are set out at page 105 of the twentieth report of the imperial economic committee on the wheat situation, 1931, and later figures issued by the dominion bureau of statistics in its monthly bulletin of agricultural statistics for May, 1935, at page 152.

So I submit that stabilization has been of tremendous advantage and there is no indication that our present trouble is in any way permanent at all so far as I can see, not if we have common sense. I submit therefore that the arduous job has been done and done well, and that we are better off than we would have been if we had followed any other policy that has been suggested as an alternative-better

off in dollars. If this country loses some money as a result of this carry-over it at least indicates that the farmers of western Canada have benefited to some extent.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   CANADIAN GRAIN BOARD
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July 4, 1935

Mr. KENNEDY (Peace River):

I hope that when the Prime Minister (Mr. Bennett) speaks he will indicate that that is not the intention of the government.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   CANADIAN GRAIN BOARD
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