Médéric MARTIN

MARTIN, Médéric

Personal Data

Party
Liberal
Constituency
St. Mary (Quebec)
Birth Date
January 22, 1869
Deceased Date
June 12, 1946
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Médéric_Martin
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=1de351b4-9b68-4be3-a9aa-17ac27646fa5&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
industrialist

Parliamentary Career

November 21, 1906 - September 17, 1908
LIB
  St. Mary (Quebec)
October 26, 1908 - July 29, 1911
LIB
  St. Mary (Quebec)
September 21, 1911 - October 6, 1917
LIB
  St. Mary (Quebec)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 1 of 20)


August 31, 1917

Mr. MARTIN:

I did not say that he was a returned soldier.

Topic:   SUPPLY.
Subtopic:   DR. B. A. LEBLANC.
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August 31, 1917

Mr. MARTIN:

On the occasion of the first parade in the city of Montreal against the high cost of living, I permitted the citizens to make a demonstration on the condition that they would be quiet, but trouble was started by an assault made by a soldier. There were 25,000 people in the parade, and as it was going east on St. Catherine street a regiment of soldiers going north came along and the parade was stopped to allow the regiment to pass through. Just as the regiment had passed the last soldier snatched a French flag from 10 p.m. some one in the parade and threw it under his feet. The people in the parade had not said anything to the soldiers, and the trouble was all the fault of this soldier who tried to insult the French-Canadian people. There was a fight, and I do not know whether the soldier was killed, as I have not seen anything about it in the newspapers. I remember that a meeting at the park five weeks ago, which was called by me, was attended by 150,000 people. A soldier started to insult my hon. friend from Maisonneuve (Mr. Verville), who was giving an address. I did not want the people to attack the soldier, but I had a hard time saving him from injury. Eventually I got him to the car with some constables. I admit that the soldiers have the right to attend meetings, but they have no right to provoke the people. They are the ones who are making the noise. I do not allow anybody to make speeches such as have been made this week in Montreal. I do not allow anybody to preach revolt, because we have enough on our backs already with conscription. The minister must tell his soldiers to respect civilian citizens, not only in the city of Montreal, but everywhere else in the Dominion, and then there will be no trouble. The soldiers sometimes go in groups of twenty or fifty. I have often gone to them and said: "Boys, don't do that. Go back to your regiment. What is the use of trying to provoke the French-Canadians?"

In this House, when the hon. member for Rouville (Mr. Lemieux) was speaking against conscription, one man in uniform in the gallery used insulting language against the French-Canadian race and against the hon. member for Rouville, which I will' not repeat in this House. He was drunk, and perhaps was not responsible for what he said. But think of it! A soldier right here in the House of Commons insulting the French Canadian

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race in language which I would not repeat. If any trouble happens it will be the fault of these people. I do not say that all the English-speaking people are like that. He was only one, but he insulted the hon. gentleman (Mr. Lemieux). I had for witness Mr. Ashby, a member of the Quebec Legislature. He was sitting next to this soldier, and said it was terrible to listen to him. I know the Minister of Militia is a gentleman and does not like trouble, and I ask him to give instructions to his officers in the different cities that the soldiers must not provoke the French Canadians and incite them to fight. I will try to stop these meetings that are advertised in tonight's papers. If I am obliged to go on the platform I will go. But I will allow no more meetings. If anything happens it will be the fault of the Prime Minister, through passing this conscription law without giving the people a chance to pronounce upon it by means of a referendum. It is not only the people of Quebec who are opposed to this law, but the people of every province in Canada from the Atlantic to the Pacific, and the people are going to do all that it is possible to do when you try to get them to enlist. You cannot put that law into force. The people will not enlist, and you have no way of locating them as the different classes are called. If anything happens in Montreal, I shall be very sorry, because I do not like trouble; but if any trouble happens the soldiers will be responsible for it. The minister must stop the soldiers from drinking, because when they are drunk they do not know what they are doing, and they are trying to force the French Canadians to fight. I have often said to the soldiers, "Do not do that. What is the use of it"? I respect the soldier, especially those who have fought for the flag. I repeat, it is not only the French Canadians of Quebec who are against the conscription law, but the people of every province from the Atlantic to the Pacific. If anything happens, if blood flows in the streets of Montreal or any other city, the fault will be with the Prime Minister and with those who helped him pass that law.

Topic:   SUPPLY.
Subtopic:   DR. B. A. LEBLANC.
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August 31, 1917

Mr. MARTIN:

I am sorry to see that my ihon. friend (Mr. Sutherland) never reads the papers. I gave orders before I left Montreal to the chief of police, Mr. Campeau, that if any one opened his mouth to encourage the people to revolt, he should be arrested. If I am not in Montreal to-day, or if I was not there last night, it is because 331

I thought it was my duty to vote against the Bill to buy the Canadian Northern railway. I had to be here. If you look at La Patrie you will see what we say about Villeneuve:

(Translation) : Villeneuve is the man whom Mayor Martin threatened to have arrested the moment he opened his mouth in public, to preach revolt.

I am doing my duty in Montreal more than the hon. gentleman is doing his duty here. I gave orders and I tried to stop all these meetings. I am willing to go myself on the platform and try to stop these young people. Their proceedings are not in the interest, not only of Montreal, but of all Canada. I do not know why I should be reproached by the hon. gentleman because he does not read the papers. Since the conscription law has been passed I have been doing all I possibly could to counsel our citizens to remain quiet and to obey the law, since the law has been passed. If they do not want to enlist, well and good. These young men are responsible, especially those who come from Ontario. I do not know why they have been sent from Ontario to try and throw the blame on the city of Montreal and province of Quebec.

Topic:   SUPPLY.
Subtopic:   DR. B. A. LEBLANC.
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August 31, 1917

Mr. MARTIN:

I declare to this House and the country that the man who started the meeting against conscription and asked the people to revolt was a man from Ontario. His name was Villeneuve, and he came from St.- Eugene in the county of Prescott.

Topic:   SUPPLY.
Subtopic:   DR. B. A. LEBLANC.
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August 31, 1917

Mr. MEDERIC MARTIN:

I do not want to make a speech, but I want to correct my hon. friend.

Topic:   SUPPLY.
Subtopic:   DR. B. A. LEBLANC.
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