Charles Benjamin HOWARD

HOWARD, The Hon. Charles Benjamin

Personal Data

Party
Liberal
Constituency
Sherbrooke (Quebec)
Birth Date
September 27, 1885
Deceased Date
March 25, 1964
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles_Benjamin_Howard
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=2383d6a2-7bc8-4d50-94b0-288e425fa899&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
businessman, industrialist, lumber merchant

Parliamentary Career

October 29, 1925 - July 2, 1926
LIB
  Sherbrooke (Quebec)
September 14, 1926 - May 30, 1930
LIB
  Sherbrooke (Quebec)
July 28, 1930 - August 14, 1935
LIB
  Sherbrooke (Quebec)
October 14, 1935 - January 25, 1940
LIB
  Sherbrooke (Quebec)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 338 of 339)


February 1, 1926

Mr. HOWARD:

The last one. We have

heard a lot about keeping Canadians at home. I do not think there is a single member who does not want to keep every Canadian at home. But there is only one way to do this- to make this country so attractive and business so good that our people will prefer to stay at home; and hon. -members will note that the figures I have quoted are proof of what we are doing to this end. In many election campaigns, Mr. Speaker, we have heard this remark: "We would rather have

one Canadian than all the immigrants that could be brought in." I take exception to that statement. We are proud that we are Canadians and Canadian-born, but I say that you have only to look -back a few years to the time when our forefathers came f-rom the Old Land, travelled up the St. Lawrence and through hundreds of miles of forest, cutting down the trees to build the houses which you and I are enjoying and did not pay for. Surely it is evident that every immigrant we put into Canada is an asset which we cannot value. If we had a million more men in our Canadian northwest next year, we would have a crop worth $800,000,000 instead of $400,000,000 and the Canadian National Railways and the Canadian Pacific Railway would not be able to haul the traffic; it would have to go over the Hudson bay route. .

I am going to make two suggestions which do not bear upon the question we are considering, and then I shall have finished. I want to pay a tribute to a suggested law, the old age pension -measure. I am pleased that this government has almost decided to bring in a bill providing -for old age pensions. It is in the best interests of this country that any person who has lived in Canada and spent his money-who has not hoarded it up the way some of us do-should be taken care of when he has passed the age of seventy years, and I stand for that measure. Then there is the question of rural credits. Possibly this measure would not have been necessary had we not our present Canadian -banking system, but under the circumstances there is nothing else to do. Consequently a bill will be brought down covering this -matter of -rural credits.

One further thing I would like to see is a recommendation from the Board of Railway Commissioners that the government take over

The Address-Mr. Young (Weyburn)

its fair share of the cost of getting rid of level crossings on state highways. When this country was in its infancy-in* fact up until a few years ago-we had ordinary farm crossings on country roads, and over these crossings people passed with their teams from ten to fifteen times a day. But our governments have built beautiful highways, especially in the province of Quebec, from thirty to fifty feet wide, over which from two to three thousand automobiles pass per day. Every year these crossings take their toll of human lives. The trouble in the past has been that the municipalities, already taxed to the limit, have found it hard to keep going. They say, and rightly so, that they can get along with these crossings, so why build an overhead or underground crossing for the automobiles which use the roads? I have consulted with one or two members of the Quebec government and I know that government will do its share. I suggest that we divide the cost among the provincial government, the federal government and the railways themselves. We should do a few every year, where state roads exist, and eliminate this risk.

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February 1, 1926

Mr. HOWARD:

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February 1, 1926

Mr. HOWARD:

Mr. Speaker, I have just two more questions to discuss. First, our immigration policy,-

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February 1, 1926

Mr. HOWARD:

Very well, applaud this:

The government, with an unexampled hardihood, -has bought the support of the shrunken Progressive group and has thereby assured itself of a narrow parliamentary majority; and the purchase price is a legislative programme devised for no other purpose than that of restoring the Liberal-Progressive death knell alliance.

I absolutely take exception to these statements. I stand here as a Canadian, backed by a Canadian party, the Liberal party, and I declare that we are not running this country for the advantage of either the province of

The Address-Mr. Howard

Quebec or the province of Ontario, but that it is our intention to give such a government as is just and right to the common people, to the middle classes and to the big interests of the country alike, from the Atlantic to the Pacific. In view of the figures that I have quoted, does any hon. gentleman seriously suggest that we had to buy the Progressives? No, most assuredly we did not; and all honour to them when I add that it would be im-i possible to buy them. They are not the kind that sell.

When hon. gentlemen opposite read the Speech from the Throne I ask them, do they object to the building of the Hudson Bay railway?

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February 1, 1926

Mr. HOWARD:

Well, we do not. The

head of one of the biggest financial institutions in the world to-day, addressing his shareholders made this statement:

I am convinced-

This man is speaking in Montreal, where the head office of his company is.

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