George Stanley WHITE

WHITE, The Hon. George Stanley, P.C., Q.C.

Personal Data

Party
Progressive Conservative
Constituency
Hastings--Frontenac (Ontario)
Birth Date
November 17, 1897
Deceased Date
January 6, 1977
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_Stanley_White
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=2a9ae8fb-7717-4e1b-980d-a158b2437895&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
barrister and solicitor, lawyer

Parliamentary Career

March 26, 1940 - April 16, 1945
NAT
  Hastings--Peterborough (Ontario)
June 11, 1945 - April 30, 1949
PC
  Hastings--Peterborough (Ontario)
June 27, 1949 - June 13, 1953
PC
  Hastings--Peterborough (Ontario)
August 10, 1953 - April 12, 1957
PC
  Hastings--Frontenac (Ontario)
June 10, 1957 - February 1, 1958
PC
  Hastings--Frontenac (Ontario)
  • Government Whip in the Senate (January 1, 1958 - January 1, 1963)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 182 of 185)


November 15, 1940

Mr. WHITE:

May I interrupt the minister? He mentioned something about going to the ordnance branch. That may be all right, but if the ordnance branch had not received these supplies they simply could not pass them along.

Topic:   GOVERNOR GENERAL'S SPEECH
Subtopic:   CONTINUATION OF DEBATE ON ADDRESS IN REPLY
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November 13, 1940

Mr. WHITE:

I want to mention just one other matter and then I shall have finished. For many years there has been a great deal of resentment among the veterans of the last war with regard to the manner in which they have been treated by the pension department. I am quite frank in saying that the Conservative party have not treated the veterans any

The Address-Mr. White

better than they have been treated by the Liberal party. Certain conditions which have existed since the last war must not be allowed to creep into the method of granting pensions in connection with this war, and I would suggest that the Minister of Pensions and National Health (Mr. Mackenzie) seriously consider overhauling his pensions staff and appointing examiners and officials with a little more sympathy for the private soldier than that possessed by a slab of Scotch granite. I have handled many cases for veterans before the pension board, but you soon find out that you are up against a stone wall. The pension department hides behind the old bogy that the injury or condition complained of was not contracted during war service or could not be traced back to war service, and the entire onus of proving his case is placed on the soldier. The average private soldier has neither the means nor the opportunity to do this; and in any event I can easily imagine the feelings of the average man appearing before this hard-hearted board with all its endless red tape. The pension board takes the position that its officials and doctors are always right, and it pays very little if any attention .to the opinions of civilian doctors.

Already the pension board is beginning to operate in the same way with regard to the present war; I might briefly state a case to illustrate my point. This man enlisted on October 24, 1939. He had two medical boards; he w'as X-rayed and placed in category A. In December, 1939, he proceeded to England, but on account of inferior and ill-fitting boots he developed trouble with his feet. On April 4 he was reboarded, placed in category E and sent home. He was discharged on May 16, 1940, and needless to say has received no pension. The man is unable to stand on his feet for any length of time at work. He applied for a pension but his application was refused. The official letter from the pension board reads:

This ex-soldier was discharged from the Canadian active service force on account of medical unfitness.

The commission rules that the conditions noted above are pre-enlistment, not aggravated during service.

I have applied for a second hearing, and the matter is now pending. Surely these men are entitled to the benefit of the doubt, if there is any doubt. It has been the custom to laud and praise the soldier to the skies, but here we have such matters as free transportation- I was going to mention allowances-and pensions which must be dealt with. Surely it is the duty of this government to see that every last soldier receives everything coming to him.

[Mr. White.)

In conclusion I should like to just pass on a remark made to me a short time ago at the Trenton airport. I was speaking to a number of young Americans who had seen fit to come to Canada and join the air force. To one young American coming from California I said, " Just what made you decide to enlist in our army?" His reply was, " We are still brothers under the skin, and I just had to come."

Topic:   GOVERNOR GENERAL'S SPEECH
Subtopic:   CONTINUATION OF DEBATE ON ADDRESS IN REPLY
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November 13, 1940

Mr. WHITE:

Yes.

Topic:   GOVERNOR GENERAL'S SPEECH
Subtopic:   CONTINUATION OF DEBATE ON ADDRESS IN REPLY
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November 13, 1940

Mr. WHITE:

I could finish in just a moment if I might have permission.

Topic:   GOVERNOR GENERAL'S SPEECH
Subtopic:   CONTINUATION OF DEBATE ON ADDRESS IN REPLY
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November 13, 1940

Mr. WHITE:

One free leave a month, and one at his own expense.

Topic:   GOVERNOR GENERAL'S SPEECH
Subtopic:   CONTINUATION OF DEBATE ON ADDRESS IN REPLY
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