George Stanley WHITE

WHITE, The Hon. George Stanley, P.C., Q.C.

Personal Data

Party
Progressive Conservative
Constituency
Hastings--Frontenac (Ontario)
Birth Date
November 17, 1897
Deceased Date
January 6, 1977
Website
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_Stanley_White
PARLINFO
http://www.parl.gc.ca/parlinfo/Files/Parliamentarian.aspx?Item=2a9ae8fb-7717-4e1b-980d-a158b2437895&Language=E&Section=ALL
Profession
barrister and solicitor, lawyer

Parliamentary Career

March 26, 1940 - April 16, 1945
NAT
  Hastings--Peterborough (Ontario)
June 11, 1945 - April 30, 1949
PC
  Hastings--Peterborough (Ontario)
June 27, 1949 - June 13, 1953
PC
  Hastings--Peterborough (Ontario)
August 10, 1953 - April 12, 1957
PC
  Hastings--Frontenac (Ontario)
June 10, 1957 - February 1, 1958
PC
  Hastings--Frontenac (Ontario)
  • Government Whip in the Senate (January 1, 1958 - January 1, 1963)

Most Recent Speeches (Page 2 of 185)


July 22, 1960

Mr. White:

I just want to say a word or two on this item. Westminster hospital in London, Ontario, is located in my constituency and consequently I feel considerable interest in the problems of the veterans. First of all I want to pay tribute to the sympathetic understanding of the minister of the problems of veterans. I also want to pay tribute to the excellent staff of doctors and nurses at Westminster hospital. All over my riding I hear compliments from time to time about the great work they are doing at that hospital for our disabled veterans.

Having said that there are other questions which arise from time to time. It was brought to my attention during the winter months that of the over 800 trees in the grounds some 413 were diseased or had scale or some other problem and were to be removed. I have received more complaints regarding the proposed removal of these trees than about any other thing which has been done in the area. I am glad to hear that the destruction of these trees has been delayed and that the Ontario department of forestry was going to make a survey of these trees. It is interesting to note that a company in the city received in 1955 almost $1,500 for spraying, pruning and fertilizing these trees, and in 1956 they received $1,497. But when we come to 1960 it is discovered that almost half of these trees are earmarked for destruction.

I am concerned about this because not only the hospital authorities but also the provincial highways department and the county organizations have developed a tree butchery campaign, and when you realize it takes a lifetime to grow these beautiful trees, we should hesitate before they are removed. I do not object to the removal of those trees which become dangerous. They should be removed. But I doubt if there is one tree in all the forests of Canada on which you cannot find a bug, a scale or a disease of some kind. Consequently the argument that these trees are all diseased does not hold water as far as I am concerned, and I hope that before a large number of them are removed provision will be made for young trees to be planted before the older ones are removed.

I also want to say a word or two on item 462, but before I sit down I want to ask the minister what progress is being made on the new building at Westminster hospital? (Translation):

Topic:   I960
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June 23, 1960

Mr. While:

Mr. Chairman, I do not intend to delay the deliberations of this committee for very long, and I think I can finish by a minute or two after one o'clock.

First of all I wish to commend the minister for his able administration of the department, and I want to compliment the hon. member for Quebec West for his very sound contribution to the deliberations of this committee this morning.

The reason I rise at this time is to bring to the attention of the minister and the committee a certain amount of consternation which was aroused among my constituents, as well as, I feel, many other people in the province of Ontario, when it was mooted in

Supply-Health and Welfare the press that the cost of hospital insurance in the province of Ontario would be increased by 10 per cent. Ontario residents are not unaware that prior to the commencement of hospital insurance, hospital rates were increased considerably. I am not prepared to say the percentage, but there was quite a considerable increase percentagewise. The residents of Ontario were sold the hospital insurance plan simply because the cost of hospitalization was getting to the point where many citizens of the province felt that unless they had a hospital insurance plan of some kind they certainly could not afford hospitalization.

So I rise to protect an increase in hospital insurance rates, and I do so also because we were told that this was going to be an economical method for the people to obtain insurance. We hear a good deal today from certain quarters about monopolies; there is a lot of complaint about monopolies on the part of companies. But the worst monoply in my estimation is a state monopoly, something against which you cannot legislate, something against which you cannot argue. It is a bureaucratic monopoly, and that I am certainly against.

If hospital rates could be increased by 10 per cent after one year without any protest from the people paying the rates, what is to hinder them being increased another 10 per cent two or three years hence? This leads to sloppy administration on the part of hospitals, and I do not think we want that.

I want to commend the hon. member for Quebec West for his plea that we evade at all possible cost what is spoken of as state medicine. I believe it is quite possible for the medical profession-and I am certain they are engaged in doing so-to work out a prepaid plan that will be acceptable to all Canadians. Then the medical profession can go on with their very worth-while work and the ill can have the doctor of their choice. Bureaucracy in the treatment of the ill is something which I personally have no wish to see.

Mention was made of annuity plans and the possibility of being able to transfer from one job to another or from one industry to another the pension plan that was commenced at an earlier date. All these pension plans are commendable, but let us look back 20 years and see what has actually happened. We must examine the value of the dollars people contributed to pension plans some years ago, and recognize that it bears no resemblance to the 50-cent pieces they draw out today. That is what inflation does. If we are going to witness a continuation of the galloping inflation that has gone on since 1945 we will witness

Supply-Health and Welfare a corresponding decline in the incentive for people to save and the ultimate destruction of all incentive so to do.

I thank the committee for its indulgence.

At one o'clock the committee took recess.

Topic:   ANSWERS TO QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   DEPARTMENT OF NATIONAL HEALTH AND WELFARE
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June 23, 1960

Mr. While:

Mr. Chairman, I do not intend to delay the deliberations of this committee for very long, and I think I can finish by a minute or two after one o'clock.

First of all I wish to commend the minister for his able administration of the department, and I want to compliment the hon. member for Quebec West for his very sound contribution to the deliberations of this committee this morning.

The reason I rise at this time is to bring to the attention of the minister and the committee a certain amount of consternation which was aroused among my constituents, as well as, I feel, many other people in the province of Ontario, when it was mooted in

Supply-Health and Welfare the press that the cost of hospital insurance in the province of Ontario would be increased by 10 per cent. Ontario residents are not unaware that prior to the commencement of hospital insurance, hospital rates were increased considerably. I am not prepared to say the percentage, but there was quite a considerable increase percentagewise. The residents of Ontario were sold the hospital insurance plan simply because the cost of hospitalization was getting to the point where many citizens of the province felt that unless they had a hospital insurance plan of some kind they certainly could not afford hospitalization.

So I rise to protect an increase in hospital insurance rates, and I do so also because we were told that this was going to be an economical method for the people to obtain insurance. We hear a good deal today from certain quarters about monopolies; there is a lot of complaint about monopolies on the part of companies. But the worst monoply in my estimation is a state monopoly, something against which you cannot legislate, something against which you cannot argue. It is a bureaucratic monopoly, and that I am certainly against.

If hospital rates could be increased by 10 per cent after one year without any protest from the people paying the rates, what is to hinder them being increased another 10 per cent two or three years hence? This leads to sloppy administration on the part of hospitals, and I do not think we want that.

I want to commend the hon. member for Quebec West for his plea that we evade at all possible cost what is spoken of as state medicine. I believe it is quite possible for the medical profession-and I am certain they are engaged in doing so-to work out a prepaid plan that will be acceptable to all Canadians. Then the medical profession can go on with their very worth-while work and the ill can have the doctor of their choice. Bureaucracy in the treatment of the ill is something which I personally have no wish to see.

Mention was made of annuity plans and the possibility of being able to transfer from one job to another or from one industry to another the pension plan that was commenced at an earlier date. All these pension plans are commendable, but let us look back 20 years and see what has actually happened. We must examine the value of the dollars people contributed to pension plans some years ago, and recognize that it bears no resemblance to the 50-cent pieces they draw out today. That is what inflation does. If we are going to witness a continuation of the galloping inflation that has gone on since 1945 we will witness

Supply-Health and Welfare a corresponding decline in the incentive for people to save and the ultimate destruction of all incentive so to do.

I thank the committee for its indulgence.

At one o'clock the committee took recess.

Topic:   DEPARTMENT OF NATIONAL HEALTH AND WELFARE
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February 12, 1959

Mr. While:

Yes, Mr. Speaker.

Motion stands.

Topic:   COMMITTEES OF THE HOUSE
Subtopic:   EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
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August 14, 1958

Mr. White:

Mr. Chairman, I want to take about five minutes of the time of the committee to say a word or two about western Ontario and the development there, past, present and future. I wish to bring to the attention of the minister the site that was first mentioned and developed by the late John R. MacNicol, a former member of this house. That area was situated in Kent county adjacent to the river Thames on No. 2 highway. This was the site of an Indian village which was destroyed by invading Americans many years ago. The site was lost for many years. Through the efforts of John R. MacNicol and many of the local residents the area has been developed, a small park was provided there and any time that I ever

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Supply-Northern Affairs drive that way I find the park is in use by tourists and visitors from the United States and the surrounding area. It is my opinion that this could be expanded.

I understand that in the area there are many people who are in possession of Indian relics of one kind or another and that possibly on the site a museum could be constructed which would house-and I know there are many who would contribute-those Indian relics to this museum. There are also some materials which were used by the pioneers which may disappear entirely from the Ontario scene in a very few years. They could well be housed there. I hope the minister will give serious consideration to the expansion of this project because it is situated on a very busy highway and it is a pleasant place for people to stop off at and rest. It should be very carefully considered by the minister.

While I am mentioning the name of John R. MacNicol may I say that I believe he was one of those who first mentioned the possibility of the development of the South Saskatchewan river dam.

I want to turn now for a moment or two to the Thames river valley authority and to endorse the words of the hon. member for Oxford who preceded me a little while ago. I want to point out to the minister that the work commenced by that authority some years ago is now about half completed. I refer to the major project. The Fanshaw dam has now been in existence for some years and has proven a boon to the community. But there are many other developments on the upper Thames valley which have been contemplated, and I believe considered by the minister, and we are hoping that, as the hon. member for Oxford mentioned, the pilot project will be completed.

The water problems in southwestern Ontario are acute and any development there should take water conservation into consideration. I am one of those who believe that the restoration of our forests is a fundamental part of any conservation program so that any area in the watershed that can possibly be considered as submarginal land should be devoted to forest growth.

Another problem has developed. The Fanshaw dam in the upper Thames valley was sold to the residents of the valley as a conservation measure to ensure a fresh and continuous flow of water through and beyond the city of London. However as soon as the dam was completed the city of London commenced to draw off water for city use. They polluted it with sewage and dumped it back into the river. For 50 years the city of London has also been using artesian wells nearby. Actually

what has happened is that in a sense the city of London has been stealing water from the surrounding municipalities. Those municipalities find this embarrassing and the farmers in the nearby areas not only find it embarrassing but expensive because of the lack of water. It is a detriment to the farms in the community and a financial loss to many of the farmers. Therefore, when we are considering a conservation program, we should have regard for use of water.

A program that I advocated-and I am quite certain I was not one of the originators-at the University of Western Ontario some 13 years ago was to draw a supply of water for the western Ontario area from lake Huron by means of a pipe line. It would supply many municipalities en route to the city. Now with the introduction of the Ontario water resources commission this plan is under very serious consideration at this time. The city of London favoured the plan. I mention this because it has a relationship to the conservation of water and other resources in the upper Thames valley area.

But, strange as it may seem, the public utilities commission which provides the water for the municipalities and have, as I said, secured their supply of water from the adjacent municipalities by artesian wells are inclined to oppose this forward-looking plan of the Ontario water resources commission. The public utilities propose a filtration plant at the Fanshaw upper Thames valley site. The net result will be that there will be less pure clean water flowing down the Thames river through London, Ontario, and more polluted water added for questionable downstream benefits.

The department of northern affairs and all other public bodies interested in this problem should take a long forward look at it, not with a view to ascertaining what the results might be tomorrow but what the needs and results might be 50 years or more hence. I am not against, in fact I am for, the completion of the upper Thames valley authority plan as soon as possible. However,

I want it to be a plan which will serve the greatest number of people in the area and which will give the greatest possible benefits for the dollars spent.

I do not want to take any more of the time of the committee in discussing the upper Thames valley authority. I hope the minister will look favourably upon the plan and consider it when he is compiling his estimates for the coming year.

I do want to say a word about national parks. I was very interested, as I am sure the members of the committee were, in what the hon. member for Oxford said about

the problem of Long Point island. I endorse what he had to say. I should like to refer also to an area called Mitchells bay where United States interests hold a long-term lease. They secured this lease from the former government. I, like the Prime Minister, believe in Canada for Canadians. I hope that when these leases run out they will not be renewed. I hope that the policy of the government eventually will be to create a national park in that heavily populated area.

(Translation):

Topic:   CANADIAN BROADCASTING CORPORATION
Subtopic:   REQUEST FOR RESUMPTION OF PROGRAM
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